The Fab to Table Movement is Changing the Future of Food

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Yes, you read that right. As the farm-to-table trend continues to make an impact on all restaurants in each segment, there is also another new movement gaining momentum in the industry. 

Robyn Metcalfe, who is the founder and director of Food+City at the University of Texas at Austin, coined the term "fab to table" after noticing that engineers are now playing a bigger role in what lands on our plates. 

Engineers are working with farmers to come-up with innovations to make farming easier and to produce more food, along with new alternative proteins. 

“It’s really the protein revolution that is a part of this conversation,” said Metcalfe to "Silicon Hills," a local technology news outlet in Austin and San Antonio. “And crickets, cricket protein, bug protein is a part of that. And it will affect the supply chain if you have more protein coming from plants, crickets and other things, other than meat, there is a whole shift in the way food is produced, how it finds its way to your plate. And a big re-engineering of the supply chain as those protein sources change.”

Food+City, formally known as Food Lab, was launched four years ago to help come up with sustainable solutions to the problems in the food industry. 

“It’s really a two-part mission: telling stories and inspiring entrepreneurs to launch startups to solve problems,” said Metcalfe. 

Food+City hosts the Food Challenge Prize, that encourages innovators to experiment with technology to solve some of the challenges we are seeing emerge in today’s food network.

Although we have seen several food start-ups fail in the last year, Metcalfe believes that this is still more investment potential in this sector and that the food bubble has not exploded.

“I think we are experiencing sort of that pause, and reconsideration and more learning and less sort of just panicked participation in the market,” said Metcalfe. 

Learn more about the “Fab to Table” movement and Food+City’s efforts to help change the future of food at “Silicon Hills.”