Seattle's Chef John Sundstrom Breaks Down a Spanish-Styled, Braised Wild Alaska Pollock Dish

Seattle's Chef John Sundstrom Breaks Down a Spanish-Styled, Braised Wild Alaska Pollock Dish

On this episode of On Foodable, we are featuring Chef John Sundstrom, owner of Lark Restaurant in Seattle, who will be working with underutilized, wild Alaska pollock, provided by Trident Seafoods, to make a rustic Spanish-style dish. This is the first episode out of our four-part series of chef demos that were filmed at our Foodable.io Seattle event, sponsored by the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute.

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The New Miami: How KYU is Elevating the Food Scene in Wynwood

The New Miami: How KYU is Elevating the Food Scene in Wynwood

On this episode of Table 42, Paul sits with Chef Michael Lewis and Steven Haigh to talk about how the restaurant connects with the community, the thoughtful design, and KYU’s unique name. Not to mention we get a behind the scenes look at popular menu items like the roasted cauliflower with goat cheese, shishito, and herb vinaigrette and the Wagyu beef brisket with black shichimi pepper.

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Burn, Burning, Burnt: How to Avoid Losing Kitchen Staff in This Industry

Burn, Burning, Burnt: How to Avoid Losing Kitchen Staff in This Industry

You want a sharp staff, but they are worn dull and nowhere near as effective as when their utility shirts still had the Dickies tags on them. Kitchen staff work hard, under extreme conditions and pressure, and keep production rolling. Not to mention, they are leaving this industry in waves as burnt-out shells of their former selves.

We want them to run specials, for instance, but operators aren’t engaging the process to give them breathing room. Creativity suffers, tempers wear phyllo-thin, and then there is the inevitable exit, at a rate around ¾ of your staff per year.

How can the holes in your foodservice business be plugged to ensure that it doesn’t keep happening?

The Trifecta of Failure

Overworked, underpaid, and undervalued are repetitive themes when talking with staff members, across segments, and across the country.

Over 60-hour work weeks are not infrequent, as much as they are the norm. Pay is supposed to be on a merit, right? Isn’t that how a craft trade works? And the people working hands-on in a hot kitchen are dealt body blows when it comes to being praiseworthy.

The trifecta of failure has been woven into the fabric of chefs’ aprons at an incredible cost and as an anchor that drags down loyalty.

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Will the Cannabis Boom Expand to These States After the Midterms?

Will the Cannabis Boom Expand to These States After the Midterms?

Today, voters in four states will vote on ballots with medicinal and recreational cannabis initiatives. Both North Dakota and Michigan has legislation on ballots that could pass cannabis recreationally, while Utah and Missouri could pass cannabis for medical use.

"These are the four states that will vote on 6 November. If they pass in Michigan and North Dakota, 1 in 4 Americans will have legal access to weed. Meanwhile, if Utah and Missouri pass their ballots, medical marijuana will accessible in over 50% of all states," writes "The Guardian."

All legislation on cannabis legalization being voted on today are expected to pass.

So far, there are nine states where cannabis is legal and then 22 states where cannabis can be prescribed to patients for medical conditions.

In 1996, California was the first state to legalize medical marijuana. In 2012, Colorado and Washington pass legislation that made cannabis legal recreationally. Cannabis became legal in Alaska, Oregon, and D.C. in 2014.

Then in 2016, state marijuana legalization laws passed in California, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, and Vermont.

These legislations have ignited a cannabis dining movement. Fine dining chefs in California cities like Los Angeles and San Francisco are now incorporating cannabis into their menus. California's wine country is also gearing up to embrace cannabis wine infusions.

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Kimpton Predicts More Plant-Based Dishes and Mocktails on Menus in 2019

Kimpton Predicts More Plant-Based Dishes and Mocktails on Menus in 2019

With only two more months left of 2018, the 2019 food trend predictions are starting to roll out.

Last year, like many forecasts predicted, we saw a spike in vegan dishes.

But this was just the beginning.

Plant-based options have now become mainstream and they aren't only being selected by vegetarians or vegans either.

According to the Kimpton's 2019 Culinary & Cocktails Trend Forecast by Kimpton Hotels and Restaurants group, the plant-based movement is going into overdrive in 2019.

"Expect to see more “whole beast movement” but with a vegetable twist, as more chefs experiment with “whole vegetable” entrées, like a roasted eggplant with eggplant caviar, and crispy eggplant skin chips," writes Kimpton.

The Kimpton 2019 Culinary + Cocktail Trends is based on the feedback received from a survey sent to the leading chefs, sommeliers, general managers, and bartenders at 80+ Kimpton restaurants and bars.

According to Kimpton's data, besides plant-based focused dishes, restaurants are introducing more adventurous protein dishes like fried kidneys and lamb liver. Simple classics are expected to see a revamp like cauliflower gnocchi and Fois Gras fried rice.

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Pairing Olive Oil As You Would With Wine Will Set Your Menu Apart

Pairing Olive Oil As You Would With Wine Will Set Your Menu Apart
  • What are some key factors when choosing an olive oil to highlight your dish?

  • Foodable presents top Italian extra virgin olive oils and how to pair them with your menu.

Much like wine, there is a method behind choosing the right olive oil for a dish. Using a specific  olive oil can not only complement and reinforce flavors in your dish, but also highlight the unique taste the oil brings to the dish.

To create your menu, you should pair olive oils with these flavor categories in mind: delicate, medium or robust.

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Air Canada Releases Top Restaurants List

Air Canada Releases Top Restaurants List

Every year, the airline Air Canada releases a list of the best restaurants in the Great White North to entice more food-loving travelers to make a trip.

This year, it's not surprising to see that restaurants from the country's most popular culinary destinations like Toronto and Montreal made it on the list, but some gems in smaller towns in Ontario also landed on the list.

The No. 1 restaurant on the list is The Restaurant at Pearl Morrissette.

This French culinary gem features a seasonal "ever-changing multi-course menu" in Jordan Station, Ontario.

“If you let someone see a menu before a meal, they’re usually going to start telling you about everything they see that they don’t like,” said Daniel Hadida, co-chef at The Restaurant at Pearl Morrissette about the blind tasting menu in an interview with “The Globe and Mail.” “We cook with a lot of weird ingredients, but we’re hoping our guests can trust us and try something new.”

Since the restaurant is an off-suit of the popular winery Pearl Morissette, each food course is specifically designed to pair with a wine selection.

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Simple Never Tasted So Good with Idahoan® Rustic Homestyle Russets Mashed Potatoes

Simple Never Tasted So Good with Idahoan® Rustic Homestyle Russets Mashed Potatoes

The majestic spud has withstood the test of time as a favorite side dish of diners, and for good reason.

Potatoes don’t just taste good, they are also good for you, offering an enriching source of vitamins C and B6, manganese, phosphorus, niacin and pantothenic acid.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, potatoes are the No. 1 vegetable crop in the U.S. and the fourth most consumed crop in the world. The average American eats roughly 124 lbs. of potatoes per year.

It also holds the honor of being the first vegetable to be grown in space.

Besides the taste, the spud remains so popular because of its versatility. There are thousands of potato varieties, but the most popular include russet, red, white, yellow, purple, fingerling and petite. Potatoes can be served either baked, mashed, roasted, fried, scalloped or hashed, among many other creative options.

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Getting to the Meat of the Menu

Getting to the Meat of the Menu

Meet Tyson Fresh Meats’ Foodservice Experts

As an operator, you are always on the lookout for quality protein to source for your menu. One problem: in a saturated market, it’s tough to tell who is going to deliver. Dependable consistency, quality and great service are a given for a business to thrive — so which company should an operator turn to.

The Beef & Pork Experts™ at Tyson Fresh Meats are confident: they’ve got you covered.

Quality Products, Quality Partners

"There are so many different attributes that our customers are looking for, and those change from quality attributes to production attributes,” said Ozlem Worpel, senior brand manager of Tyson Fresh Meats Marketing.

“When we talk about [beef] quality attributes, it’s ‘Is it USDA Choice grade? Is it USDA Prime grade?’ If we're talking about pork, ‘What kind of pH level? What kind of color? What kind of marbling does it have?’”

“If we're talking about production attributes, ‘How are the animals raised? Are they never ever given antibiotics? Or added hormones? How are they are fed, is it a vegetarian diet?’"

The Tyson Fresh Meats Team prides themselves on a broad portfolio of quality fresh beef and pork products and the willingness to work with partners to find exactly what they’re looking for.

"We really know the meat business, from sourcing the best livestock, to producing the protein the most cost-efficient and safe way to do so," said Worpel. "Most of our employees have degrees in animal science, and they know the meat. So when they sit and talk with a consumer, they understand their needs, sometimes better than what the customer thinks they need."

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There’s More Than Meat to the Beef & Pork Experts™

There’s More Than Meat to the Beef & Pork Experts™

A Closer Look at the Trusted Excellence of Tyson Fresh Meats Foodservice

Today’s consumers are increasingly educated about proteins — and with that knowledge comes an increased awareness and interest about where their food comes from.

Questions about menu sourcing have become the norm, and the answer can directly impact your bottom line. Operators are feeling the pressure to find a supplier with the products, expertise and reliability to help them stay competitive.

It’s a challenging atmosphere. For the Tyson Fresh Meats Team, it’s a challenge they embrace.

When Tyson Foods acquired IBP, inc.in 2001, forming Tyson Fresh Meats, they also inherited a legacy: nearly 60 years’ experience in the beef and pork industry and a reputation for getting results. Honoring those industry stalwarts, Tyson Fresh Meats has become one of the largest processors of beef and pork.

Today, the Tyson Fresh Meats Team differentiates themselves from the competition with a wide-ranging portfolio, including a direct nod to the history of quality and best-in-class customer service established by their predecessors with the ibp Trusted Excellence® brand.

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