The Formula For Better Hires at Your Restaurant

The Formula For Better Hires at Your Restaurant

Hiring can suck. In an uber-competitive and growing industry like restaurants, you can feel like your back is against the wall. 

Desperation creeps in as you attempt to find a warm body to fill those empty spots on your schedule. Then desperation turns into panic and you do the one thing that signals the decline of your culture, you feel as though you are forced to compromise your hiring standard. 

This is commonly known as "The Panic Hire" and it is safe to say that every restaurant manager or owner has done it before. Ultimately, you are going to pay a cost for allowing this to happen. You don’t see it at first. In fact, when you hire that person you feel relieved. Finally, someone showed up for an interview and they were breathing!

You talk to yourself (pretty much just convincing yourself) that “it’ll be okay”, “they just need some (a lot) of training." Denial is your friend in times like these.

Here’s the first rule to better hiring: Stop lying to yourself. 

Reality check time. Are there restaurants in your market that have some amazing staff? Do you have at least one A player on your team? If yes, then there is some real talent in your market, so it’s probably just your formula for hiring needs to be changed.

Your hiring formula (or recipe) may have worked for you over the last few years (or decades). Look around and you’ll see that times are changing and those that fail to update their formula to hire will soon be left with the less desirable employees. Cream does rise to the top and those with the best talent gravitate towards the restaurant brands with a solid reputation.

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When ICE Comes Knocking: Preparing Your Restaurant for Immigration Enforcement

When ICE Comes Knocking: Preparing Your Restaurant for Immigration Enforcement

The Trump administration has made no bones about its crackdown on illegal immigration. Earlier this year, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents swept into ninety-eight 7-Eleven stores across the country and demanded proof of employees’ eligibility to work in the United States. The sweep was part of the administration’s efforts to curb illegal immigration by targeting employers, and the message was clear: “Businesses that hire illegal workers are a pull factor for illegal immigration, and we are working hard to remove this magnet,” said Thomas D. Homan, Acting Director of ICE. “If you are found to be breaking the law, you will be held accountable.”

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Building the Next Generation Brand

Building the Next Generation Brand
  • Freshii, Honey Butter Fried Chicken, and Kabbage discuss what makes a successful restaurant brand

  • Foodable.io session dissects emerging brands and what guiding pinciples matter like people, environment, and profitability

On this Foodable.io Session, FCSI Consultant and Foodable Host Bill Bender gathers some growing companies to discuss top-performing food brands and what is responsible for their growth. While we often explore new advances in technology and innovation in menu development and design, these brands bring it back to the basics.

In this episode, we talk about how treating your employees well impacts your productivity and thus profits, and how your profits come full circle to pay your employees well. We explore meeting your customers where they are and scaling without losing a winning culture. Tune into this episode for all that and more. And be sure to check out the rest of Foodable’s .io content on our On-Demand Page and on Foodable+.

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Chef Eileen Andrade Aims to Make a Destination Out of Miami Suburb, Kendall

Chef Eileen Andrade Aims to Make a Destination Out of Miami Suburb, Kendall

"If I could describe my style of cooking, I would definitely say— bold," says Chef Eileen Andrade.

And “bold” is right as her restaurants serve up a combination of Cuban, Peruvian and Korean dishes.

There is no stopping this fierce Miami-based chef from accomplishing her goals.

In her mid-twenties, Eileen Andrade, opened her first restaurant, Finka Table & Tap in Kendall, an unassuming suburban Miami neighborhood. Now, the 29-year-old sits down with Foodable to talk about her newest restaurant concept, Amelia’s 1931, which she opened less than a mile away from her first concept.

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Passing Notes: The Cheesecake Factory's Road to a Disability Discrimination Lawsuit

Passing Notes: The Cheesecake Factory's Road to a Disability Discrimination Lawsuit

In 2016, The Cheesecake Factory was sued by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) for failing to provide an effective accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). According to the lawsuit, the company denied Oleg Ivanov’s repeated requests for orientation training with either closed-captioned video or an interpreter and instead relied on passing written notes to communicate with him at his interview, orientation, and meetings.  

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5 Things Restaurant Owners Need to Know About Sex-Based Discrimination

5 Things Restaurant Owners Need to Know About Sex-Based Discrimination

Turns out, sexual harassment isn’t the only type of sex-based complaint employers are facing. LGBT-related workplace complaints are on the rise, but unlike with sexual harassment, the law isn’t nearly as clear. In fact, it varies extensively across state and federal courts, leaving many employers at a loss to understand their legal obligations. Let’s take a look at what restaurant owners need to know about sex-based discrimination in the workplace – what conduct is illegal and where.  

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Building a Rockstar Team for Your Restaurant

Building a Rockstar Team for Your Restaurant

On this episode of The Barron Report, brought to you by Kabbage, we dive into Agricole Hospitality brands to see how they manage hiring and staff.

In 2011, Ryan Pera and Morgan Weber teamed up to open Revival Market, a butcher shop inspired by City Meat Market in Yoakum. It has since evolved to become a full-service breakfast/lunch restaurant and butcher shop. The success of Revival prompted the duo to open Italian restaurant Coltivare, where Morgan developed the cocktail menu, in 2014.

While building the spirits list and managing the bar program at Coltivare, Morgan's interest in bourbon continued to grow. Once he ran out of room for bourbon on the back bar at Coltivare, the idea for Eight Row Flint, aptly named after the variety of corn first used in American whiskey, was born. Eight Row Flint was named one of the best new bars in the country by Playboy in 2016.

Now with 7 different brands under the Agricole Hospitality umbrella, Weber and Pera are starting to get a knack for building top quality teams. From constantly interviewing to patiently grooming their team, this organization has unlocked some key attributes of a successful brand. Listen along with the show notes below to see how you can start attracting top-quality candidates, too!

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Scratch Cooking Revives Traditional Views of Casual Dining

Scratch Cooking Revives Traditional Views of Casual Dining

On this episode of The Barron Report, brought to you by Kabbage, the Tupelo Honey team joins Paul Barron in a discussion of what makes brands successful in today's market.

Tupelo Honey was founded in Asheville in 2001 as a revival of Southern food and traditions rooted in the Carolina Mountains. With 15 total locations in 7 states, Tupelo's Southern spirit is infused into every bite of their flavor driven dishes.

CEO Steve Frabitore bought the restaurant in 2008 and it's been growing ever since.

On this episode, VP of Operations and Beverage Director Tyler Alford; and VP of Culinary and Corporate Executive Chef Eric Gabrynowicz take us through the nitty gritty of what has made Tupelo one of Foodable's Top Emerging Brands. 

Tupelo takes great pride in their sourcing. They believe that as a small conglomerate of restaurants, their ability to affect change is far greater than that of smaller, independents. Switching to an organic, locally-grown chicken in their restaurants accounts not for hundreds of dollars in change but hundreds of thousands of dollars.  

And their commitment to top quality culinary doesn't stop there. The beverage program at Tupelo Honey also speaks to the brand's commitment to improving the quality of casual dining chains. With kitchens that cook almost entirely from scratch, Chef Gabrynowics says transforming the beverage program to be more culinary-driven was not a far stretch to make. 

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All the Laws You Need to Know Before Starting Your Restaurant

All the Laws You Need to Know Before Starting Your Restaurant

On this episode of The Barron Report, brought to you by Kabbage, Paul speaks to Lawyer A.J. Yolofsky about what operators need to concern themselves with before starting their own restaurant concept. Yolofsky Law manages these types of start-ups often and has seen their fair share of poorly executed legal documents.

"Do you want a piece of paper or do you want peace of mind?" says A.J. "I recently had a client come to me and they're looking at acquiring another restaurant location and the other location said 'Oh, we've got all our documents. We're completely legal setup, everything.' And they very proudly brought out this corporate kit binder that they ordered online."

Needless to say, that story doesn't end well. Listen to this episode and follow along with the show notes below to learn how you can avoid major snafus like this one with just a few important steps. And if you find yourself needing some help funding your concept, turn to our friends over at Kabbage. They can help you prep your business and manage those new business expenses.

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HelloFresh Finds Success in U.S. Surpassing Blue Apron in Customer Growth

HelloFresh Finds Success in U.S. Surpassing Blue Apron in Customer Growth

Since the German meal-kit service, HelloFresh, went public late last year, the company more than doubled its customer base in the United States. This is thanks to its wise investment in marketing, which has propelled the business forward surpassing its biggest competitor— Blue Apron.

“HelloFresh’s customer base also grew to 1.5 million globally, making it much bigger than Blue Apron, whose customer base shrank 15 percent to 746,000 due to lowered marketing spending,” as reported by “Recode.” It’s important to note that “HelloFresh includes customers who’ve received free boxes toward its customer total while Blue Apron only counts paying customers,” which obviously adds to its overall customer count.

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