Impossible Foods to Roll Out Plant-Based Steak

Impossible Foods, one of the leading companies in the plant-based market, isn't only going to sell its popular veggie-burger. Instead, the company is also working on developing a plant-based steak product, according to a recent interview with Impossible Foods' CEO Patrick Brown.

Brown said that a veggie steak that even meateaters love could be "the most impactful thing" the company does.

"[Steak] has huge symbolic value,” said Brown to "The Spoon." "If we can make an awesomely delicious world-class steak ... that will be very disruptive not just to the beef industry, but to other sectors of the meat industry."

However, developing a steak formula isn't easy. A steak marbling and texture is difficult to replicate without using any animal products at all.

Just last week, Impossible Foods announced that its Impossible Burger will have a new recipe that is gluten-free after the company decided to switch out the wheat protein for a soy protein concentrate. The new patty also has no animal hormones or antibiotics either, along with less salt. The new burger patty also has the consistency to be used as ground meat now, meaning it has multiple applications besides just being a veggie burger.

While Impossible Foods is experimenting with new products, it's Impossible Burger has become one of the most popular veggie burgers out there. It's vegan, yet it bleeds like a real burger. The company has focused on the restaurant market and White Castle now serves the Impossible Slider for $1.99.

The company's mission to offer an alternative to meat products, as it says on its website "using animals to make meat is a prehistoric and destructive technology."

Read more about Impossible Foods’ mission to launch a steak product at “Food Dive” now.

But the higher cost of plant-based burgers could be detouring consumers, especially meat eaters from selecting them as their protein option.

Impossible Foods' rival Beyond Burger has focused on retail and sells its plant-based burger for $5.99 for two patties at grocery stores. This is more than half the price for real beef burgers.

But Beyond Meat, which recently went public, has more of an expansive product line, which includes "chicken" strips, "beef" crumble, and "sausage"– all made out of plants, non-GMO soy, and pea protein.

We recently sat down with Ethan Brown, the CEO of Beyond Meat to discuss why plant-based foods have become so popular. Listen to the episode of The Barron Report below where Host Paul Barron talks to Brown about the future of the plant-based market and Beyond Meat's role in the movement.

The Plant-based Impossible Burger has a New Gluten-Free Recipe

As the battle of the plant-based burgers continues, one of the front runners the Impossible Burger is introducing a new formulation to cater to more eaters with dietary restrictions.

The veggie burger's new recipe is now gluten-free after the company decided to switch out the wheat protein for a soy protein concentrate. The patty also has no animal hormones or antibiotics either, along with less salt.

The Impossible Burger by Impossible Foods is a plant-based burger that debuted in 2016. It looks so much like the traditional beef burger that it even bleeds.

It has been quickly added to the menus of restaurants across the country, including White Castle.

Although the company's previous formulation was a hit with the masses, including non-vegetarians and vegans, the company decided to change the recipe for a few reasons.

"Impossible Burger fans told us loud and clear they wanted a gluten-free burger that was at least as nutritious as meat from animals,” said David Lee, COO and CFO of Impossible Foods in a statement. "Our new product delivers all the taste meat lovers crave — without compromise to nutrition or the planet."

Not only did the company listen to feedback from the customers, but the new recipe makes the product more adaptable and can be substituted for ground meat. The former patty, on the other hand, was intended for mainly flat-top cooking.

The new recipe Impossible Burger will be available for retail later this year.

Read more about Impossible Foods latest change at "Food Dive."

As we said, veggie-burger companies have been battling it out to capture more of the market share. According to recent data from Nielsen, the sales in the plant-based market spiked by 20 percent over the last year.

We recently sat down with a competitor of Impossible Foods to discuss why plant-based foods have become so popular. Listen to the episode of The Barron Report below where Host Paul Barron talks with Ethan Brown, the CEO of Beyond Meat to learn more.

The Top 20 Plant-Based Chefs and Foodies

The consumer demand for plant-based menu items is at an all-time high. 

According to recent Foodable Labs data, there was a 129 percent spike in whole vegetable dishes on chef menus year over year.

The plant-based movement only continues to gain more momentum and this is thanks to chefs and foodie cooks presenting veggie-centric dishes that aren't only appealing to vegans and vegetarians. 

Not to mention, more and more meat-eaters have become flexitarians, where their diet is primarily plant-based but they occasionally eat meat.

Smoothie bowl with raw foods  |  Shutterstock

Smoothie bowl with raw foods | Shutterstock

So what chefs and foodies are getting the most social attention for their plant-based dishes? 

We pulled from Foodable Labs data to curate a list of the Top 20 Plant-based Chefs and Foodies based on their combined social Sentiment and Engagement score. 

Let's take a closer look at the top five vegan chefs and foodies dazzling taste buds with their plant-based dishes. 

No. 1 Matthew Kenney

This east coast celebrity chef and author has been a trailblazer in the industry with his vegan cuisine and opened his 15th vegan restaurant this last summer. 

After attending the French Culinary Institute (which is now known as the International Culinary Center,) he worked at multiple upscale restaurants in New York City where he rose through the ranks. 

He opened his first restaurant Matthew's in 1993 and it quickly received multiple accolades. Then in 2004, he opened his first vegan concept Pure Food and Wine. He later founded the PlantLab, (formerly known as The Matthew Kenney Academy) a raw vegan and plant-based focused culinary school.

Today Kenney continues to build his culinary empire. He now has 15 restaurants around the world with nine more in the works.

Kanu, his newest restaurant in Canada, serves plant-based dishes all day including the Butternut Squash Nachos with guacamole, salsa verde, lime crema, radish over blue corn chips and Heirloom Tomato & Zucchini Lasagna with sun-dried tomato marinara, macadamia ricotta, and pistachio pesto. 

No. 2 Angela Liddon

This blogger turned award-winning writer has built a plant-based recipe empire. 

She started her blog Oh She Glows back in 2008 when she was recovering from an eating disorder and wanted to share her journey of finding a healthy lifestyle.  

The blog and its unique recipes quickly garnered millions of online readers and this home chef has built the Oh She Glows blog into a vegan lifestyle brand. 

In 2014, Liddon published her first book "The Oh She Glows Cookbook," which was a "New York Times" Bestseller. 

Fast forward to today and the blog now has 1 million unique readers a month and features over 550 healthy plant-based recipes like the Instant Pt Cauliflower and Butternut Thai Curry and vegan 3-Ingredient Chia and Quinoa Flatbread.

No. 3 Chloe Coscarelli

This vegan chef started her own vegan lifestyle in 2004. This is when she realized that the options for vegan eaters were scarce, so she started on a mission to bring more plant-based dishes to the masses. 

She studied at the Natural Gourmet Institute in New York City and went on to focus on plant-based nutrition with a certification from Cornell University's online program. 

But it was eight years ago when Coscarelli's culinary career blew up. This is when she appeared on the wildly popular baking competition TV show "Cupcake Wars" and was the first vegan to win a competition on television. 

After that, she published her first cookbook "Chloe's Kitchen" in 2012, then another cookbook "Chloe's Vegan Desserts in 2013" and "Chloe's Vegan Italian Kitchen" in 2014. 

She went on to open the fast-casual chain By Chloe, which there are five stores of now and she is no longer affiliated. In March of this year, she published another plant-based cookbook "Chloe Flavor: Saucy, Crispy, Spicy, Vegan" which features recipes like the No-Huevos Rancheros, and Banaba Doughnuts with Maple Glaze. 

Want to see what other chefs and foodies made this list? Check out the video above and the full top 20 list below. 

  1. Matthew Kenney | Instagram | 192.15

  2. Angela Liddon | Instagram | 192.08

  3. Chloe Coscarelli | Instagram | 190.85

  4. Timothy Pakron | Instagram | 191.27

  5. David Lee | Instagram | 189.67

  6. Dana Shultz | Instagram | 189.37

  7. Ayindé Howell | Instagram | 189.02

  8. Horacio Rivadero | Instagram | 188.27

  9. Josef Centeno | Instagram | 186.08

  10. Chef Babette | Instagram | 186.07

  11. Todd Erickson | Website | 186.06

  12. Laura Oates | Instagram | 185.34

  13. Eddie Garza | Instagram | 185.27

  14. Gaz Oakley | Instagram | 185.02

  15. Maya Sozer | Instagram | 184.99

  16. Charlie Grippo| Instagram | 183.08

  17. Isa Chandra Moskowitz | Instagram | 181.49

  18. Doug McNish | Instagram | 180.91

  19. Tal Ronnen | Instagram | 180.55

  20. Richa Hingle | Instagram | 180.18

The Health Trends That Will Be More Prevalent in 2019

Shutterstock

Shutterstock

The healthy eating movement has transitioned from a diet to a lifestyle for many consumers. With that in mind, health food trends only continue to gain momentum.  

Each year, new trends emerge but not every trend goes mainstream.

So what will 2019 bring?

The healthy snack company Kind released a new trend report with collected data from 5,000 food and beverage experts to determine what will reign next year.

One trend expected to become more prevalent come 2019 is infused water.

But it’s not just favorites like cucumber water and lemon water–maple water and other unusual flavors will be served that offer nutritional benefits.

“Take cactus water, for instance, it’s generally lower in calories and sugar than traditional coconut water, and provides lots of betalain antioxidants for promoting skin revitalization, according to Jackie Newgent, RDN, culinary nutritionist and KIND Snacks spokesperson,” writes “Forbes.”

Then there’s the plant-based movement, which exploded in 2018, according to recent Foodable Labs data.  

New vegan-friendly proteins are popping up on menus across the country and that isn’t going to stop in 2019.

“In 2019, expect more meat-alternatives in the market, including plants, insects, lentils, soy, dairy-free protein alternatives going mainstream. Aside from the innovations highlighting nuts, extruded seeds, beans, water lentils and algae in snack bars, chips, meat-free burgers or sausages and dairy-free yogurts and cheeses, one of the most exciting developments is cell-based meat—namely meat and protein extracted from animals’ cells without killing the animal at all,” writes “Forbes.” 

The CBD craze is also going to be taken to the next level in the New Year. CBD, the legal cannabis compound, has been used as a herbal remedy for a long time. But just recently, CBD has been infused in cocktails, coffee beverages and olive oil. 2019 will bring even more CBD infusions like CBD-infused yogurts, salad dressings and more. 

Listen to this recent episode of The Barron Report below to learn how CBD is making an impact in the foodservice industry.

Check out the other food and health trends outlined in the Kind’s report at “Forbes” now.

Plant-based Meat Gets Pushback From Missouri and France

As more consumers gravitate to plant-based diets, multiple vegan companies have emerged to provide more options that fit into these consumers' lifestyle.

While Beyond Meat just filed an IPO, this plant-based burger company, along with others in the market appear to be facing legal challenges from the state of Missouri and the country France.

"In France, you can now be fined 300,000 euros (about $343,000) if you “use ‘steak,’ ‘sausage,’ or any other meat term to describe products that are not partly or wholly made up of meat,” BBC reports. This rule also applies to dairy alternatives," writes "Fortune."

Even using the a term before steak like "soy steak" isn't allowed.

Missouri passed similar legislation this year over the legal term of meat.

"Missouri lawmakers earlier this year banned food marketers from marketing a product as meat if it’s not made of livestock or poultry. The fine for violations can run as high as $1,000, and you can end up incarcerated in a penitentiary," writes "Fortune."

But as "Fortune" points out– why isn't peanut butter forced to adhere to these types of laws That's because some meat companies are declaring war on plant-based meat.

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association pushed for the law and then in France, a cattle rancher sponsored the bill.

While some are trying to halt the plant-based companies’ growth, others are jumping on the veggie meat bandwagon.

Tyson Foods invested in Beyond Meat back in 2017 and then in Memphis Meats, a lab-created meat company.

“We continue to invest significantly in our traditional meat business, but also believe in exploring additional opportunities for growth that give consumers more choices," said Justin Whitmore, executive vice president corporate strategy and chief sustainability officer of Tyson Foods when the company invested in Memphis Meats.

Cargill also invested in Memphis Meats saying it was a move "all about sustainability."

Read more about these laws barring plant-based products from using the term meat at “Fortune” now.

Will more laws like this arise? And how will Beyond Meat respond?

We recently covered Beyond Meat's massive growth and the company's decision to go public on an episode of The Barron Report. Watch the video below to see how this company's Wall Street move will impact the plant-based industry.