Foodable Network Shows are Now Available on Spotify

Foodable Network Shows are Now Available on Spotify

Move over Apple, Spotify continues to reign in the music streaming realm.

Earlier this year, Justin Patterson, an analyst for Raymond James predicted that Spotify's subscriptions will spike to 150 million by 2020.

This is double the current number of subscribers.

"The music industry is shifting from a transactional to on-demand model, and Spotify is well positioned to double its subscriber base, expand gross margin, and generate material free cash flow," wrote Patterson back in May. It has "one of the best growth rates in tech – there is a scarcity of companies poised for 40 percent annual profit growth through 2019."

Apple launched Apple Music, a streaming service in 2015 for $10 a month to compete with Spotify and other music streaming services like Pandora. But Patterson doesn't anticipate that Apple will be able to overtake Spotify in the music category.

"We doubt Apple ever overtakes Spotify ever in music," said Patterson. "Rather, the risk is that Apple slows Spotify's growth in markets where iOS devices have large installed bases."

Although Apple and Amazon are both ahead of the game when it comes to on-demand video content and podcast, Spotify has been aggressively collecting this type of content.

With its massive subscriber database, Spotify could quickly emerge as a strong competitor in this space.

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1.2 Million Consumers Have Cut the Cord, Shifting the Media Landscape

1.2 Million Consumers Have Cut the Cord, Shifting the Media Landscape

Now that content is readily available for instant streaming on so many platforms like Hulu and Netflix, consumers are no longer willing to pay premium pricing for cable.

Although there are still 91 million customers with cable, Telco TV, or Satelite dish, according to "Cord Cutters News" over 13,000 people a day are canceling traditional TV.

In the months of July, August, and September- cable, Telco TV, or Satelite dish lost at least 1.1 million subscribers, as reported by the research firm MoffettNathanson.

"Satellite TV providers had their worst quarter on record with a loss of 726,000 subscribers, the firm says. Cable operators have been hit with a tough trend, too. So far this year, they have lost nearly 1.1 million subscribers, their worst losses at the three-quarter mark since 2014. So far this year, traditional pay-TV providers have lost 2.8 million subscribers," writes "USA Today."

However, "Cord Cutters News" claims that this is likely an underestimate.

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The State of Social Media with Ted Rubin

The State of Social Media with Ted Rubin

On today’s episode of The Barron Report, we are in the studio with Ted Rubin, social media strategist, speaker, and author of several books, including “The Age of Influence: Selling to the Digitally Connected Consumer” to talk social media marketing strategy in the ever-changing digital landscape.

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Facebook Makes Quick Rebuttal to the Latest Accusatory NYT Article

Facebook Makes Quick Rebuttal to the Latest Accusatory NYT Article

At the end of March, Facebook's Cambridge Analytica scandal hit the media.

Soon the hashtag #DeleteFacebook was trending on Twitter.

“According to Facebook, data from about 300,000 users was originally collected by a Cambridge lecturer named Aleksandr Kogan in 2013 for a personality quiz app. But given the way Facebook worked at the time, Kogan was able to access data from "tens of millions" of friends of those users, Zuckerberg said. While Kogan collected the data legitimately, he then violated Facebook's terms by passing the information to Cambridge Analytica,” writes "CNET."

Facebook tried to keep the error hidden from the public because it eventually was revealed that the social network was aware of the infraction in 2015. Facebook, instead, demanded that Cambridge Analytica destroy the information immediately. As reported by "The Guardian" and "The New York Times," not all data had been deleted, according to information provided by the former data scientist for the firm and whistleblower, Chris Wylie.

Listen to the podcast below to learn more about the Facebook data debacle and it’s impact on restaurants.

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How Gen Z Cooks and Eats

How Gen Z Cooks and Eats

The generation after millennials, Generation Z now makes up 25 percent of the population. This segment of the population is bigger than the Baby Boomers or millennials.

With that being said, this group will someday have the greatest buying power.

The Hartman Group just released a report specifically on this population and its eating habits.

This group, which is made of people born from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s, is much more familiar with cooking at home, although they rely on adults to provide them with the food and beverages in the household.

"Busy household schedules mean that teens do much of their own food prep and often eat alone for every meal except dinner (and occasionally at dinner, too)," according to The Hartman Group’s Gen Z 2018 report. "With so much autonomy at home and easy access to information and instruction, Gen Z are actually quite confident in the kitchen. A practical generation, they see cooking as an accessible life skill available to anyone with an internet connection."

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How Pei Wei’s Clean-Label Initiative is Pushing Menu Transparency in the Restaurant Industry

How Pei Wei’s Clean-Label Initiative is Pushing Menu Transparency in the Restaurant Industry
  • Pei Wei’s CMO Brandon Solano discusses the clean-label initiative and their CTA for other brands.

  • Pei Wei’s second Twitter account, Pei Wei Tiger uses a more authentic communication strategy.

On this episode of The Barron Report, Paul Barron is joined by Chief Marketing Officer of Pei Wei, Brandon Solano, to discuss Pei Wei’s clean-label initiative and supply chain challenges that go along with it.

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The Era of the Super Foodie is Here

The Era of the Super Foodie is Here

Thanks to social media, we have become acutely aware that consumer love to show off their food.

Super foodies, also known as Food Connected Consumer (FCC,) represent 62 percent of Americans.

This group has significant buying power and has spent $835 billion in U.S. food expenditures, according to a study by Fogelson & Co.

But getting an Instagram worthy photo isn't the only thing that today's food-obsessed consumer care about and as a marketer, it's important to keep this in mind.

“Our research underscores an emerging, passionate majority of mainstream Americans who care about the food they eat, value transparency, and are loyal to brands that speak to them,” said Susie Fogelson, Founder and CEO of Fogelson & Co. “The findings suggest ways for food, beverage, hospitality and dining brands to rethink their storytelling strategy.”

FCCs aren't dining out as often though, according to the study.

This group is preparing meals from scratch at least three times a week.

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Restaurant Traffic is Down by Almost 30 Percent

Restaurant Traffic is Down by Almost 30 Percent

2018 has not been kind to the restaurant industry.

You may have noticed multiple headlines announcing the closure of stores of restaurant brands you thought were doing well in today's market.

We recently reported that even honeygrow is closing three stores in Chicago and then Taco Bueno filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Both these announcements were somewhat of a surprise considering both chains have grown wildly popular.

These restaurants aren't alone.

According to Foodable labs data, the number of restaurant closures is a record high. Social Restaurant Visits (SRVs) are down significantly, meaning restaurant traffic is slow.

With fewer customers visiting restaurants, fewer restaurant reservations are being made. The space is becoming even more competitive for not only restaurants but also for third-party services like restaurant reservation apps.

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Instagram Bans Canadian Influencers From Posting Cannabis Content

Instagram Bans Canadian Influencers From Posting Cannabis Content

Although cannabis was made legal in Canada last week, Instagram influencers are getting their cannabis-related content pulled down by the social media platform.

Apparently, the social platform isn't providing any reasoning for why these posts are being removed, instead, the user is getting a notice that says it violates their community guidelines.

Instagram's guidelines have "strict rules around cannabis portrayal that are intended to prohibit the facilitation of smoking weed. While you can post about weed-related content and advocate for marijuana, promoting the sale of the drug is against the rules," according to "CTV News" in Toronto.

Influencer Natalia Chiles posted on the platform with a cannabis teacup giveaway but the post was then taken down with no explanation.

It appears as though Instagram is struggling to review the content posted on the app because after Chiles spoke to a local news station, Instagram responded saying that removing the post was a mistake.

"Because of the borderless nature of our community, we try to enforce our policies as consistently as possible," said Alex Kucharski, an Instagram representative said in an email. "Our team processes millions of reports each week, and sometimes we get things wrong. We're sorry for the mistakes."

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How Rich's Helps Define Clean Label and Sustainability

How Rich's Helps Define Clean Label and Sustainability
  • Rich’s vice president of Health and Authenticity, Jen VanDeWater, shares the company’s efforts on clean labeling and authenticity in their products.

On this episode of The Barron Report, Jen VanDewater, Vice President of Health and Authenticity at Rich Products Corporation, sits down with our host Paul Barron to discuss how a large company like Rich’s is addressing concerns over clean labeling and authenticity in their products, among other topics.

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