Big Food is Fostering Innovation

Big Food is Fostering Innovation

Large corporations have been noticing how consumers have been favoring products made by independent startup food companies, since a good chunk of those provide craft, high-quality, niche, and, a lot of times, healthier products.

Needless to say, big food wants in. Especially, since this specialty food segment has a tremendous growth potential.

So, how is big food seeking innovation?

Companies like Campbell Soup, Chobani, Kellogg, Kraft Heinz, Nestlé, PepsiCo, and Tyson are creating innovation centers and/or partnering with existing incubators to help niche brands grow and flourish.

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How Food Safety is Marketable

How Food Safety is Marketable

Audits, cleaning schedules, SOP's, and a glowing health department inspection are a marketing advantage. Identifying key elements in your operation to keep media recognition positive makes sense. Is there a balance between clean and museum-like? Form and function strike a balance with the right systems, people using tools and brainpower that matter.

“I always look for the place where I would want to eat after I am done doing the inspection,” said “Grace.”

Grace is a department of health inspector in the mid-Atlantic whose identity is being kept concealed for her privacy as well as those locations which she inspects. Grace tells of stories of cockroaches left bobbing in salad dressing, seeing blood dripping from a cook’s open wound into meatball mixture, and “that one time I saw a dishwasher using glass cleaner in the sanitizing sink in place of sanitizer,” amongst others.

Her tales of ill and disgust are numerous. But so are stories of stand-out operations that take customer safety as a guiding light. We know what bad publicity does - ask our friends at Chipotle how the last few years have gone.

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Beyond Meat Goes Public

Beyond Meat Goes Public

A few weeks ago, there were rumors that the plant-based company Beyond Meat was planning to go public before the end of the year.

Well, these rumors ended up being true because last Friday, Beyond Meat filed an initial public offering for $100 million.

Beyond Meat reported $56.4 million in revenue for the first nine months of 2018, which is a 167 percent spike from last year.

"Going forward, we intend to continue to invest in innovation, supply chain capabilities, manufacturing and marketing initiatives," said the company in the filing.

The plant-based market is growing at a rapid rate as more consumers gravitate to a vegetarian or flexitarian lifestyle.

Plant-based consumption is up over 300 percent over the last year, according to our Foodable Labs data.

The Good Food Institute (GFI) has also released market data from Nielsen showing that the sales of this sector have recently exceeded $3.7 billion and that plant-based meat sales specifically have increased by 23 percent.

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How Sweetgreen is Becoming the Next Fast Casual Unicorn

How Sweetgreen is Becoming the Next Fast Casual Unicorn
  • On this live episode of the Barron Report, Paul discusses the biggest news of the week — how salad chain Sweetgreen is quickly becoming the next fast casual market leader.

  • Find out why wings may be taking on pizza in takeout choices for delivery.

  • Diageo sells 19 of their brands to make way for craft spirits.

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Operator Guidelines For Building Delivery Sales Through Third-Party Service Providers

Operator Guidelines For Building Delivery Sales Through Third-Party Service Providers

On this episode of The Takeout, Delivery, and Catering Show, Valerie and Erle speak with Gracie Prasanson, director of sales for Jason’s Deli and a member of the Catering Council for Multi-Unit Operators, about how restaurant operators working with third-party service providers can make sure that a strong foundation is in place, and known risks are mitigated so that your restaurant does not get outmaneuvered by the third-party provider.

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Why Millennials Want Smaller Turkeys

Why Millennials Want Smaller Turkeys

For years, the bigger the turkey was on the Thanksgiving table, the better. But this year's turkeys are trending smaller and that isn't by accident.

This is because millennials aren't looking for those pump massive turkeys that leave leftovers for days.

Food waste is becoming an increasingly concerning issue,” said Michael Averbook, a food and drink analyst at Mintel Group to "Fortune." “Leftovers are part of the fun and tradition of the holidays, and this may be a small step for individuals to feel less wasteful and socially responsible.”

Not only do millennials want to be less wasteful, but they are also more concerned about how the turkey is treated prior to being placed on the dinner table.

“People are starting to understand it’s not natural to grow turkeys up to 30 pounds,” said Ariane Daguin, co-founder and owner of D’Artagnan LLC to "Fortune." “In general, that means they were penned up with no room to move around, and that’s why they’re fat like that.”

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Facebook Makes Quick Rebuttal to the Latest Accusatory NYT Article

Facebook Makes Quick Rebuttal to the Latest Accusatory NYT Article

At the end of March, Facebook's Cambridge Analytica scandal hit the media.

Soon the hashtag #DeleteFacebook was trending on Twitter.

“According to Facebook, data from about 300,000 users was originally collected by a Cambridge lecturer named Aleksandr Kogan in 2013 for a personality quiz app. But given the way Facebook worked at the time, Kogan was able to access data from "tens of millions" of friends of those users, Zuckerberg said. While Kogan collected the data legitimately, he then violated Facebook's terms by passing the information to Cambridge Analytica,” writes "CNET."

Facebook tried to keep the error hidden from the public because it eventually was revealed that the social network was aware of the infraction in 2015. Facebook, instead, demanded that Cambridge Analytica destroy the information immediately. As reported by "The Guardian" and "The New York Times," not all data had been deleted, according to information provided by the former data scientist for the firm and whistleblower, Chris Wylie.

Listen to the podcast below to learn more about the Facebook data debacle and it’s impact on restaurants.

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How Gen Z Cooks and Eats

How Gen Z Cooks and Eats

The generation after millennials, Generation Z now makes up 25 percent of the population. This segment of the population is bigger than the Baby Boomers or millennials.

With that being said, this group will someday have the greatest buying power.

The Hartman Group just released a report specifically on this population and its eating habits.

This group, which is made of people born from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s, is much more familiar with cooking at home, although they rely on adults to provide them with the food and beverages in the household.

"Busy household schedules mean that teens do much of their own food prep and often eat alone for every meal except dinner (and occasionally at dinner, too)," according to The Hartman Group’s Gen Z 2018 report. "With so much autonomy at home and easy access to information and instruction, Gen Z are actually quite confident in the kitchen. A practical generation, they see cooking as an accessible life skill available to anyone with an internet connection."

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How Pei Wei’s Clean-Label Initiative is Pushing Menu Transparency in the Restaurant Industry

How Pei Wei’s Clean-Label Initiative is Pushing Menu Transparency in the Restaurant Industry
  • Pei Wei’s CMO Brandon Solano discusses the clean-label initiative and their CTA for other brands.

  • Pei Wei’s second Twitter account, Pei Wei Tiger uses a more authentic communication strategy.

On this episode of The Barron Report, Paul Barron is joined by Chief Marketing Officer of Pei Wei, Brandon Solano, to discuss Pei Wei’s clean-label initiative and supply chain challenges that go along with it.

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The Era of the Super Foodie is Here

The Era of the Super Foodie is Here

Thanks to social media, we have become acutely aware that consumer love to show off their food.

Super foodies, also known as Food Connected Consumer (FCC,) represent 62 percent of Americans.

This group has significant buying power and has spent $835 billion in U.S. food expenditures, according to a study by Fogelson & Co.

But getting an Instagram worthy photo isn't the only thing that today's food-obsessed consumer care about and as a marketer, it's important to keep this in mind.

“Our research underscores an emerging, passionate majority of mainstream Americans who care about the food they eat, value transparency, and are loyal to brands that speak to them,” said Susie Fogelson, Founder and CEO of Fogelson & Co. “The findings suggest ways for food, beverage, hospitality and dining brands to rethink their storytelling strategy.”

FCCs aren't dining out as often though, according to the study.

This group is preparing meals from scratch at least three times a week.

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