Not Female Chefs... Just Chefs

On this episode of Chef AF, our host Chef Jim Berman sits down with Chef Mollie Kaufmann of the restaurant Little Pearl in Washington, D.C. to shed some light on the “controversial” topic of being a female leader in what has been a predominantly male-led industry.

“I think there are a lot more female chefs than people realize, and I think there are a lot more female chefs behind male restaurateurs than people may realize,” says Kaufmann.

She goes on to explain that the way traditional kitchens operate does not need to change to accommodate a chef, just because that chef happens to be a woman. The only thing that needs to evolve is the industry's ability to even the playing field. To lead a successful kitchen, there must be mutual respect and a positive work environment. Chef Mollie explains that it hasn’t been an easy journey but that has not stopped her from becoming a lead chef at a highly rated restaurant.

“The end goal is the food and your experience as a guest, and it shouldn’t matter if a man cooked it or a woman cooked it or whomever,” says Kaufmann.

Listen to the podcast above to hear the full conversation with Chef Kaufmann about her journey and her advice on how to grow into a flourishing chef and team leader in today’s industry, regardless of whether you are male or female.

Robot Employees are the Latest Grocery Store Technology

2019 is proving to be an innovative year for the foodservice industry. Technological advances such as cashless stores and apps that help fill more restaurant seats with hungry diners aren’t the only latest trends.

Some of the latest innovations we’ve seen at Foodable are introducing technological advances, like robots, to the grocery store space.

Grocery chain Stop and Shop, is partnering with mobile market startup Robomart to bring a new method of grocery delivery to Boston this Spring. Instead of having customers order their groceries and deliver them to the door, customers will be able to order a remote-operated Robomart vehicle to their door via an app and pick out their own produce from a pre-stocked vehicle.

The Robomart app utilizes a patent-pending RFID “check-out free” system, charging customers automatically for items.

Another way technology is becoming more prevalent in the grocery store space is shown by Giant Food Stores.

Recently, the chain introduced a robot named Marty to its 172 United States stores. Marty is  built to roam around the store, looking for spills and trip hazards, which are reported to store employees. But that’s not all Marty can do, the robot can scan shelves for items that are out of stock, and perform price checks, looking for discrepancies between the shelf and the store’s scanning system.

Watch the video above to learn about other technological advances in the grocery store industry, and what companies are employing robots.

Produced by:

Rachel Brill

Rachel Brill

Social Producer


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Philly Bans Cashless Stores, Should Amazon Be Worried?

The city of brotherly love has passed legislation that prohibits businesses from going cashless. After July 1, businesses could be fined up to $2,000 if they don't accept cash payments.

Philly lawmakers in support of the bill argue that cashless establishments exclude a segment of the population without bank accounts or debit or credit cards.

26 percent of the city's residents are living below the poverty line, according to a spokesperson for Philly's Mayor Jim Kenney, who signed the bill into law.

"It just seemed to me unfair that I could walk into a coffee shop right across from City Hall, and I had a credit card and could get a cup of coffee. And the person behind me, who had United States currency, could not," said Bill Greenlee, Councilman and bill co-sponsor, to the "New York Times."

Signage at an Amazon Go Store in Seattle |   Shutterstock

Signage at an Amazon Go Store in Seattle | Shutterstock

However, there are some exemptions to the law, including parking garages, hotels, and rental car businesses.

Philly isn't the only city considering this type of legislation either. Some cities, like Boston, already have this in place.

"Similar legislation is under consideration in cities including New York, San Francisco, Chicago and Washington, DC. In New Jersey, the legislature has approved a bill which now just needs Governor Phil Murphy's signature to become law. Massachusetts, meanwhile, has long required businesses to accept cash," writes "engadget."

So how will this impact cashless, tech-focused stores like Amazon Go locations?

The law allows retailers with membership models (like Costco, BJ's) to be cashless, specifically cashless transactions are allow "at retail stores selling consumer goods exclusively through a membership model that requires payment by means of an affiliated mobile device application." But not everyone who uses Amazon.com is an Amazon prime member. This is also the case when it comes to the Amazon Go stores. So legislation like this could detour Amazon from setting up Amazon Go stores in certain cities.

Read more about Philly’s new bill at “engadget.”

Watch the episode of The Barron Report above to learn more about this new legislation and why Philly lawmakers felt it was needed.

Is The Future of Dining Digitization? Allset CEO Thinks So!

We are living in a world with a live and thriving “on-demand” economy.

From having the choice to watch your favorite TV shows on your own time and schedule, to ordering meals and groceries through your mobile phone or online.

Companies seem to have finally figured it out…

Time is of the essence!

People seem to be willing to pay for their precious time to avoid time-consuming, mundane tasks. And with so many efficiencies taking place in different aspects of people’s lives, consumers are getting accustomed to speedy services so they can get back to what’s most important to them.

This phenomenon has us thinking… Is the future of dining digitization?

On this episode of On Foodable Feature, we learn from Stas Matviyenko, CEO and co-founder of Allset—a San Francisco-based application that aims to help restaurants provide a more efficient dining experience to guests who are short for time.

Watch the full interview to learn how this app can help increase a restaurant operation’s bottom line, how the technology integration would look like, and costs associated with the service!

How The World's First OatMeals Cafe Has Reimagined The Use of The Traditional Grain

“I really believe that if you start your day with oatmeal you normally make better decisions throughout the rest of your day… So, this brand has a lot of legs in today’s world,” says Stephens.


On this episode of Emerging Brands, Samantha Stephens, chef and founder of OatMeals shares with Foodable the origins of her single-ingredient fast casual concept and how she built it from the ground up.

OatMeals is the world’s first oatmeal cafe located in Greenwich Village, a neighborhood in New York known for its brownstones buildings. Stephens believes her brand in very on-trend right now especially with the rise of the health movement and all the benefits and versatility that oats have to offer.

What sets this concept apart is the fact that not only it is a business concept that revolves around oats, but also the fact that it aims to evaluate the way traditional breakfast meals involving oats have been regarded for decades.

“So, it’s a build-your-own toppings bar. We’re sort of putting a non-traditional twist on old-fashioned oatmeals...,” says Stephens. “The more and more I ate oatmeal the more I realized it’s very similar to risotto or rice… You could really think about it as like a savory side dish. It’s so versatile! It sort of adapts well to any kind of topping you put on it…”

Stephens went on to explain how she experimented with the grain by adding parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, truffle oil, goat cheese, eggs, and bacon. She offers savory oatmeals as well as the traditional breakfast and sweet oatmeal offerings.

Listen to the podcast above to learn about how Samantha Stephens gained the confidence to build this business, the challenges she faces when figuring out a reasonable price point for her menu items, and how her concept aims to stay relevant in the food world in terms of trends.

To learn more about the Shark Tank-backed concept—OatMeals— check out the The Barron Report Live video interview below!