Coca-Cola and PepsiCo Debut Aluminum Water Bottles and Cans

Bottled water is here to stay—the industry is projected to gain five percent in revenue yearly through 2023. In 2019 alone, the industry brought in $67.5 million.

Sustainability, however, remains a concern. Plastic water bottle packaging has led to a large amount of non-recyclable waste in our environment.

Coca-Cola and PepsiCo are leading the change. PepsiCo will sell Aquafina water in aluminum cans beginning in early 2020, while in mid 2020, Coca-Cola will offer Dasani in a hybrid bottle composed of recycled PET, polyethylene terephthalate, and plant-based materials. Aluminum cans of Dasani will also be available.

According to Lauren King, the brand director for Dasani, this will be the “largest sustainability initiative in the brand’s history.”

Coca-Cola first announced its World Without Waste goal in 2018. By 2025, the company hopes to have converted all consumer packaging to fully recyclable material. PepsiCo similarly declared its own mission to use 25 percent recycled plastic content in all of its plastic packaging by 2025.

“It really takes investment to find the recycled PET and figure out how to put it into our bottles,” says King. “It requires some investment and some learning about the best way to make sure that the taste experience is great for consumers no matter what package they’re using.”

The Sylvester Brings a Non-Alcoholic Buzz to Miami

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In today’s overcrowded food and beverage market, bar owners often struggle to make their bar unique. And in South Florida, competition is fierce. New bars and restaurants open and close every day, and the only way to stay afloat is to offer high quality products that are truly different.

The Sylvester, located in the heart of Miami, aims to do exactly that. This season of REACH explores the unique stories behind the making of emerging and successful food and beverage businesses in South Florida. The Sylvester was just established this year, and is already making a name for itself in the city.

Ben Potts, the bar director for The Sylvester, co-founded the joint with Chef Brian Nasajon after quitting a “miserable” job in investment banking.

“I quit my job without having a plan,” says Potts. His goal was to craft drinks that were truly innovative. “Non-alcoholic beverages are what we’re trying to push and highlight.”

In addition to typical alcoholic drinks, The Sylvester offers kombucha, an extensive coffee list, tea, and wellness water and cocktails infused with CBD. There are even a few mushroom elixirs on the menu.

“We’re trying to push the envelope from a cocktail perspective,” adds Potts. The goal, for him, is to allow customers to “reap the benefits of a medicinal product in a food and beverage setting.”

The bar is designed to look nostalgic and “very distinctly” Miami. With vintage wallpaper, retro stylings, and a wide selection of board games, the place immediately feels welcoming and familial.

Check out the full episode to learn more about the bar and some of the recipes behind the unique drinks available at The Sylvester!

VinePair on the Latest Wine and Beverage Trends

Hosted annually by the Specialty Food Association (SFA) in New York City, The Summer Fancy Food Show is the largest specialty food and beverage event in North America. The New York City event showcases hundreds of future-focused restaurants, organizations, and innovators dedicated to crafting unique menus and products that meet the ever-changing needs of consumers today.

Host Paul Barron chatted with a number of trendsetters and up-and-comers in the industry this year. Adam Teeter is the CEO and co-founder of VinePair, a publication committed to providing cutting-edge wine, beer, and cocktail content that is both informative and entertaining. Teeter shares his thoughts on current beverage trends, as well as what he sees coming next for drinks.

The former director of business and audience development at Tablet Magazine, and a frequent speaker at a number of renowned food and beverage conferences throughout the United States, Teeter has always been passionate about making drinks accessible.

“We don’t have as much of a consumer base who only drinks one drink,” says Teeter. Millennials tend to be more experimental with eating and drinking when compared with older generations. “It’s fun for the industry, as it allows for lots of growth. It’s also really hard for the industry, because you now have the Budweisers of the world being like, ‘wait, these used to be really loyal consumers and now they’re not?’ It’s challenging, but there’s a lot of opportunity.”

Teeter notes that low- and non-alcoholic wines, cocktails, and beers represent a growing trend. Consumers are looking for drinks that taste as though they are drinking alcohol, but still fit into a weekday healthy lifestyle. Prosecco, rosé, and craft beer continue to be popular, and millennials and members of Generation Z love to try wines from unfamiliar countries and styles.

Wine is especially growing in popularity, as it is perceived—somewhat erroneously—as healthier than beer and cocktails, and helps consumers feel part of a larger culture.

“The idea of single serve is becoming really popular,” adds Teeter. “We are a demographic that unfortunately has commitment fears. We want to try before we buy.” And, according to Teeter, trying is often more important than buying. “We want to be experts, but to be an expert is just knowing a little more than someone else. You just want to say you’ve had it before—it doesn’t have to be the whole bottle.”

Check out the video above to hear Teeter’s thoughts on the possibilities for canned cocktails and purchasing alcohol online—or even one day ordering a glass of wine through UberEats!

Nespresso Taking the Lead in Coffee Sustainability Best Practices

Consumers today want more from their coffee: they want a meaningful experience. Specialty foods are up by 310 percent in terms of menu inclusion. For restaurants and hospitality operators, coffee offers a unique way for operators to differentiate themselves in a crowded market and make a better connection with clients.

On this episode of The Barron Report, host Paul Barron sits down with Kika Buhrmann, the vice president of B2B USA at Nespresso, a specialty coffee provider. The company’s state-of-the-art machines use coffee capsules to brew a number of coffee and espresso flavors.

“On average, customers today consume four different types of coffee each week,” says Buhrmann. “Millennials are more open to differentiation in coffee. The artistry behind coffee is becoming more and more appreciated and recognized.”

Nespresso encourages businesses and customers alike to recognize the surprising similarities in the production process that exist between wine and coffee. The company is passionate about promoting awareness of the intensive process behind coffee production, and encourages its customers to see the importance of cup selection, maintaining sustainable practices, and using renewable materials throughout the production process — right up to the point of drinking the coffee itself.

“The sustainability program sits at the core of our company,” Buhrmann explains. “Aluminum is the most sustainable material out there today, so all Nespresso capsules are made of aluminum to preserve the quality and freshness of the coffee. For any decision that we make, we look at the impact on our value chain: instead of focusing on what is the easiest thing to do, we like to focus on what is the right thing to do.”

First established in 1986, Nespresso currently works with over 100,000 coffee farmers in 13 countries. The company is highly invested in the future of both the farmers’ families and the larger communities surrounding those farmers — Nespresso wants to ensure that coffee farming remains sustainable on both the local and global level.

Listen to The Barron Report episode above to learn more about the brand-new technology coming to Nespresso machines, and how the company continues to find and develop rich new flavors. And if you would like to keep listening, check out The Barron Report podcast on iTunes Now!

Produced by:

Paul Barron

Paul Barron

Editor-in-Chief/Executive Producer


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Why are CBD Edibles Being Pulled Off Restaurants in Some Parts of the Country?

Across various parts of the country, health department officials are asking restaurants to voluntarily pull CBD-infused foods and drinks off menus.

The latest local and regional governments that have reportedly taken steps against CBD are New York City, California, Texas, and Ohio banning the substance from restaurants and retail stores.

For example, according to the New York City’s official government website, beginning July 1, New York City restaurants that don’t comply with the CBD ban voluntarily could be embargoed of their CBD products by the health department... and by October 1, officials “will begin issuing violations to restaurants and retailers for offering CBD-laced foods and drinks. Violations may be subject to fines as well as violation points that count toward the establishment’s letter grade.”

CBD, or cannabidiol, which derives from cannabis, doesn’t cause the psychoactive effects for the lack of enough THC—the compound that gives people the “high” sensation.

In fact, CBD proponents claim the substance is mainly used for its therapeutic benefits helping people relax, ease pain, anxiety, insomnia, and even depression.

Despite the fact that not many studies have been done on cannabidiol in human trials, as pointed out by a recent New York Times article, we are seeing an immense amount of CBD products being sold across the country, with Walgreens as the latest retailer to announce plans to sell creams, patches, and sprays in nearly 1,500 stores in select states.

So, why is it being pulled out of the restaurant space, specifically?

Although, the farm bill that was passed in December 2018 legalized industrial hemp in the U.S., this only means industrial hemp was removed from the controlled substance category. Anything that is put in foods and drinks has to be regulated by the Food and Drug Administration and, as of right now, CBD is not determined safe or effective for other health conditions aside from being an active ingredient in an approved drug that treats two rare and severe forms of epilepsy.

The FDA regulations are something different and there’s a huge push from lawmakers to change this.

Since there is no federal law specifically addressing CBD-laced edibles, some states, like Colorado and Maine, have already attempted to clarify the status of the substance by passing laws allowing the addition of CBD to food, as reported by Reuters. California and Texas have introduced bi-partisan legislation to do the same, as reported by the Associated Press.

Last week, the FDA slated the first public hearing to take place May 31 to discuss how to regulate CBD food and beverage products.

In the meantime, here at Foodable, we are tracking the latest in this arena:

In a podcast episode of Chef AF, Chef Brandon Foster shares with us a personal anecdote about how CBD has positively affected a local farmer to The point where this person wanted to dedicate the rest of his available land to grow hemp for the CBD industry.

In an On Foodable Feature episode, our host Layla Harrison breaks down for our audience some of the CBD-infused products that have stood out from the rest.

And in a Barron Report podcast episode, we learned about Azuca— a company offering CBD and THC products ranging from edibles to sweet syrups.

We expect to continue hearing about ‘Culinary Cannabis’ and its impact on the restaurant business and society as a whole. so, stay tuned for more interesting content!