This Butter-Poached Alaska Flounder Recipe Dazzles Guests in Oklahoma City

As both a chef and consumer, you can make a positive impact on the environment by what protein you pick for your meals.

Seafood, for example, is often more sustainable than other protein sources. But making a socially responsible decision about what fish to source involves doing your research and finding the right suppliers.

In the second season of Foodable’s Smart Kitchen & Bar, in partnership with Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute, chefs with a passion for sustainable seafood sourcing visit our kitchen to demonstrate some of their most popular fish-focused dishes. These chefs have developed a love and understanding of seafood. In this Seafood Season, prepare to learn new innovative recipes to ramp up your menu, while also being educated about the best sustainable seafood sourcing practices.

This season will also be available on Amazon Prime Video and Foodable On-Demand.

In the video above, you get a taste of Chef Chris McCabe in action as he walks us through how to cook his signature Butter Poached Alaska Flounder recipe with champagne sabayon, charred cauliflower, and a fried cod croquette.

As the culinary director of A Good Egg Dining Group in Oklahoma City, McCabe oversees five of the 12 restaurants in the group's portfolio. Seafood plays a major role on McCabe's menus and since he relies on this protein so heavily, he makes sure that the seafood he sources comes from responsibly managed fisheries and is sustainably caught, especially because this is so important to his guests.

Watch the full episode now on Amazon Prime Video or Foodable On-Demand.

French Master Chef Transforms Alaska Sablefish to This Perfectly Executed Dish

The future generation’s fish supply depends on the eco-friendly efforts we make today.

With that in mind, operators across the country are making an effort to make socially responsible decisions when it comes to sourcing seafood– whether it be by serving abundant fish populations or by buying fish that has been harvested in a way that supports healthy ecosystems.

In the second season of Foodable’s Smart Kitchen & Bar, in partnership with Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute, chefs with a passion for seafood visit our kitchen to demonstrate their most popular fish-focused dishes. These chefs have developed a love and understanding of seafood. Seafood can be more sustainable than other protein sources, but it's important to research and know the origin of a seafood species. In this Seafood Season, prepare to learn new recipes, while also learning about the sustainable seafood movement.

This season will also be available on Amazon Prime Video and Foodable On-Demand.

In the teaser episode above, you get a taste of French-bred Chef Olivier Desaintmartin's culinary mastery as he prepares one of his signature recipes with a sustainable Alaska sablefish (also known as black cod) as the centerpiece.

Desaintmartin, the owner of Caribou Café in Philadelphia, has made a name for himself with his simple, yet delicious approach to serving seafood. He has always had a special connection to seafood due to his roots as a fisherman. Watch the episode on Amazon Prime Video or Foodable On-Demand to see how he transforms a full sablefish to a perfectly executed autumn dish.

Seafood Trends & Sustainable Salmon Farming Practices

According to Foodable Labs data, seafood consumption is up 49.2 percent in consumer mentions year over year. 

But nowadays, consumers want to know where their seafood is coming from. But that isn't always easy for an operator to learn. That's why they depend on finding suppliers who are making sure to keep accurate records of where they are catching their supply of fish. 

On the recent IO Change Makers live stream Foodable Network held in Chicago, we sat down with Moises Del Rio, the general manager of Verlasso’s U.S. operations. 

Verlasso is a leader in the fishing industry due to the company's sustainable salmon farming practices. Del Rio and his team take a hands-on approach and are out in the field meeting with chefs, distributors, and restaurant teams regularly to drive awareness about the quality of the salmon from Verlasso and where it is sourced. 

"Our farms are located in these remote areas where there's literally no population, there's nobody, you have to go to the middle of nowhere to see these farms. So the salmon grows in an area where there's no interference... this allows the salmon to swim with a lot of freedom and develop in the right way," says Del Rio.

Watch the clip above to get more insights on how the company is sourcing its salmon responsibly and then how Verlasso shares this information with their customers. 

Want the full video? It's available exclusively now for On-Demand members. Learn more about Foodable On-Demand now. 

How Seafood Can Improve Mental Wellness

In the U.S., one in five Americans suffer from mental health issues each day, which is over 40 million Americans. Almost half of adults (46.4 percent) will experience a mental illness during their lifetime. Unfortunately, the mental health crisis has been on a steady incline.

Your diet not only makes an impact on your physical health but also on your mental health.

With that in mind, at the last Foodable.io event in Seattle, there was a panel solely focused on mental health and the role a healthy diet plays.

We gathered three nutrition experts including Linda Cornish, president of the Seafood Nutrition Partnership, Dr. Tom Brenna, director at Seafood Nutrition Partnership, and Lionel Uddippa, chef de cuisine at Salt in Alaska to see how a rich seafood diet, in particular, has been proven to help improve mental health.

Seafood has been shown to reduce symptoms of schizophrenia, depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and other mental disorders. Specifically, people who regularly eat fish are 20 percent less likely than their peers to experience depression. The American Psychiatric Association has even endorsed the fatty acids in fish as an effective part of depression treatment.

"The brain is fundamentally an omega-3 organ, it's richer in omega-3 than any other organ in the body...the effects of omega-3 EPA in depression specifically have been very consistent where those diagnosed with major depression using omega-3 rich oils have seen a consistent alleviation of symptoms," says Dr. Brenna.

Listen to the full podcast episode above to learn more about how seafood can make a positive impact on mental health and how the chef community can support itself and its customers through the food it serves.

Sustainability-Focused Brands Share Best Practices

Thanks to today's technology and data analytics, we are well aware of the impact we have on our environment. But knowledge is power.

Brands across the country now have teams dedicated to improving sustainable practices, all committed to a larger mission to reduce their carbon footprint.

At the Foodable.io Seattle event, we sat down with three sustainability experts– Jessica Myer, environmental specialist for Ste Michelle Wine Estates, Julia Person, sustainability and manager for Kona Brewing, and Nelly Hand, founder & and fisherman to learn about each of their roles and how their brands are providing eco-friendly solutions.

But to make sure that sustainable practices are being universally used within a business isn't always easy.

"As we grow as a company and our sustainable practices are actually coming into fruition, our biggest challenge is that our locations in eastern Washington and Oregon are very rural, so we don't have access to the recycling seen in Seattle or Portland. The city of Walla Walla (in Washington) doesn't have any glass recycling, which seems insane. But we have to find innovative ways to get our products recycled," says Myer. "Another thing is the plastic challenge. We are having to sometimes paid to recycle our plastic now, which is not necessarily sustainable for a business but we want to make sure we're doing the right thing."

This movement encompasses much more than recycling. There's water conservation, alternative power sources, fishing techniques, and harvesting practices– that all make an impact on our planet and its resources.

Listen to the full episode above to learn more about how these brands are looking for new ways to be more eco-friendly, while also closing the loop on consumers demands around full sustainability and responsibility from all sides.