How a Restaurateur and New Jersey Lawmaker Pay Tribute to Late Anthony Bourdain

How a Restaurateur and New Jersey Lawmaker Pay Tribute to Late Anthony Bourdain
  • How Anthony Bourdain helped a family business achieve the American Dream.

  • Pending approval, there may be an “Anthony Bourdain Food Trail” in New Jersey, thanks to a local lawmaker.

Earlier this month, restaurant industry icon, Anthony Bourdain, committed suicide in France.

The late chef, who was born in New York but grew up in the New Jersey suburb of Leonia, touched many lives in the industry at both a national and international level. Bourdain’s death was a shock to his family, friends, peers, colleagues, and fans everywhere. Those who mourned him made a memorial at the restaurant he served as executive chef for eight years— Brasserie Les Halles.

This week, a resolution was introduced by Democratic New Jersey Assemblyman Paul Moriarty to establish the “Anthony Bourdain Food Trail” in his honor, as reported by The Associated Press.

In New York, Bourdain’s death inspired Xi’an Famous Foods’ CEO, Jason Wang, to donate earnings from June 8 to a Suicide Hotline as announced in the company's Facebook page.

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Industry Icon Anthony Bourdain Commits Suicide, Found Dead at 61

Industry Icon Anthony Bourdain Commits Suicide, Found Dead at 61

The restaurant industry, along with food connoisseurs across the globe are devastated after the news broke this morning that TV personality and renowned chef Anthony Bourdain committed suicide at age 61.

The celebrity chef, known for his popular award-winning CNN series, "Parts Unknown" was found dead by his close friend and fellow chef Eric Ripert in a hotel room in France. Bourdain was on a work trip filming for his series at the time. 

"CNN" released a statement confirming the death of the star on Friday morning. 

"It is with extraordinary sadness we can confirm the death of our friend and colleague, Anthony Bourdain. His love of great adventure, new friends, fine food and drink and the remarkable stories of the world made him a unique storyteller," wrote "CNN" in a statement. "His talents never ceased to amaze us and we will miss him very much. Our thoughts and prayers are with his daughter and family at this incredibly difficult time."

Bourdain took viewers on culinary adventures all over the world, but he struggled behind the scenes with overcoming a drug addiction back in the 1980s, two divorces, and always being on the road away from his family. 

His journey to international stardom wasn't an easy one either. 

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Anthony Bourdain Addresses this Massive Problem in the Food Industry 

Anthony Bourdain Addresses this Massive Problem in the Food Industry 

As an operator or chef, you probably already know that the consistent influx of food waste is an inevitable problem at a restaurant.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture, estimates that 30-40 % of the food supply is food waste. Most of the time, the leftover food from restaurants is often perfectly edible, but it’s just thrown in the trash.

But the food waste problem isn't only impacting the U.S. and restaurants, it also affects supermarkets, farms, and cafeterias all over the world.

Anthony Bourdain, who has made a name for himself as a chef, author, and television personality on popular series like "Parts Unknown" and "No Reservations," has a new project in the works that will expose the food waste challenge to the masses. 

He has produced a documentary title "WASTED! The Story of Food Waste," a film that he also narrates and appears in to raise awareness about this global issue.

"I'm not an activist, but the intent of this film aligns with something that's very much personal," said Bourdain about the film that made its debut at the Tribeca Film Festival. "I came up in kitchen regimes where you live by an absolute rule of using everything and wasting nothing. And of course, as a traveler, I see again and again how circumstances force people to cook incredibly well with often very little food available to them. One film isn't going to cure all of society's ills, but if a few people start thinking about what they're eating for dinner in a different way or think twice about throwing out what is often the best stuff, it's a good day."

The documentary, which will be officially out on October 13 and was co-directer by Anna Chai and Nari Kye also features famous chefs like Dan Barber and Mario Batali and other innovators that are attempting to combat the food waste problem.  

So, what advice does Bourdain give to those chefs looking to curb their food waste? 

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Elevated Dining: Chef Experiences Cater to the Passionate Foodie Looking for a Culinary Adventure

Elevated Dining: Chef Experiences Cater to the Passionate Foodie Looking for a Culinary Adventure

BKrystal Hauserman, Foodable Contributor

Did you know we are in the midst of a food Renaissance, people? The bar has been raised! Diners are looking for much more than a “good meal.” They are looking for a memorable culinary adventure. They want to chat with the cooks about sourcing local ingredients, feel the heat of the open flame on their skin, and taste incredible, creative food. In this day and age, the restaurants and chefs that offer such experiences will no doubt find themselves with a cult following and a house full of adventurous eaters.  

A Seat at the Chef’s Table

Open, “exhibition-style” kitchens have been around for decades, and as diners have become increasingly interested in where ingredients come from and the techniques used to transform them, a seat at the “chef’s counter” has become highly coveted. Sitting face-to-face with your favorite chef typically commands a premium price, but offers a more bespoke experience – something the savvy sushi counter aficionado has known for years. The best spot in the house is often at the counter, elbow-to-elbow with a handful of other engaged patrons oohing and aahing over the parade of dishes. The menus are a bit edgier. The laughter a little more raucous. And it’s unlikely you will get the stink eye for snapping a photo or two.  

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New York "Food Courts" are Becoming More Artisanal

By now, you probably already know that Singapore’s hawker centres are a thing of culinary delight. With hearty bowls of noodle deliciousness and simple, unique fare, the centres can, in its model structure, be comparable to what we Americans know as a food court. Of course, in the U.S., food courts have a negative connotation – greasy, fried fast food with Value Meal-style upcharge offerings. No, thank you.

Foodable WebTV Network

Foodable WebTV Network

But as the overall American perception of culinary culture evolves in a new (read: healthier) direction, we are seeing a shift of these large spaces – namely, fresher, artisanal offerings that come rooted with a backstory. It’s safe to say that, in America, New York is spearheading the way to become more in-line with a market like Singapore. Eataly is a great example of this. More recently, Anthony Bourdain announced he would be creating a New York food hall with worldly dishes. Read More