Why are CBD Edibles Being Pulled Off Restaurants in Some Parts of the Country?

Across various parts of the country, health department officials are asking restaurants to voluntarily pull CBD-infused foods and drinks off menus.

The latest local and regional governments that have reportedly taken steps against CBD are New York City, California, Texas, and Ohio banning the substance from restaurants and retail stores.

For example, according to the New York City’s official government website, beginning July 1, New York City restaurants that don’t comply with the CBD ban voluntarily could be embargoed of their CBD products by the health department... and by October 1, officials “will begin issuing violations to restaurants and retailers for offering CBD-laced foods and drinks. Violations may be subject to fines as well as violation points that count toward the establishment’s letter grade.”

CBD, or cannabidiol, which derives from cannabis, doesn’t cause the psychoactive effects for the lack of enough THC—the compound that gives people the “high” sensation.

In fact, CBD proponents claim the substance is mainly used for its therapeutic benefits helping people relax, ease pain, anxiety, insomnia, and even depression.

Despite the fact that not many studies have been done on cannabidiol in human trials, as pointed out by a recent New York Times article, we are seeing an immense amount of CBD products being sold across the country, with Walgreens as the latest retailer to announce plans to sell creams, patches, and sprays in nearly 1,500 stores in select states.

So, why is it being pulled out of the restaurant space, specifically?

Although, the farm bill that was passed in December 2018 legalized industrial hemp in the U.S., this only means industrial hemp was removed from the controlled substance category. Anything that is put in foods and drinks has to be regulated by the Food and Drug Administration and, as of right now, CBD is not determined safe or effective for other health conditions aside from being an active ingredient in an approved drug that treats two rare and severe forms of epilepsy.

The FDA regulations are something different and there’s a huge push from lawmakers to change this.

Since there is no federal law specifically addressing CBD-laced edibles, some states, like Colorado and Maine, have already attempted to clarify the status of the substance by passing laws allowing the addition of CBD to food, as reported by Reuters. California and Texas have introduced bi-partisan legislation to do the same, as reported by the Associated Press.

Last week, the FDA slated the first public hearing to take place May 31 to discuss how to regulate CBD food and beverage products.

In the meantime, here at Foodable, we are tracking the latest in this arena:

In a podcast episode of Chef AF, Chef Brandon Foster shares with us a personal anecdote about how CBD has positively affected a local farmer to The point where this person wanted to dedicate the rest of his available land to grow hemp for the CBD industry.

In an On Foodable Feature episode, our host Layla Harrison breaks down for our audience some of the CBD-infused products that have stood out from the rest.

And in a Barron Report podcast episode, we learned about Azuca— a company offering CBD and THC products ranging from edibles to sweet syrups.

We expect to continue hearing about ‘Culinary Cannabis’ and its impact on the restaurant business and society as a whole. so, stay tuned for more interesting content!

America’s 1st Certified Organic QSR Is Giving Sport Fans What They Want

Foodable had the chance to catch up with The Organic Coup, the first certified organic fast food restaurant, once again, but this time at the Winter Fancy Food Show in San Francisco. On this episode of On Foodable, Paul Barron sits down with the brand’s founder, Erica Welton, to talk about latest achievements and future plans.

We first learned about The Organic Coup in 2016 when Foodable had the chance to visit its first location to learn about the brand in depth. Although the certified organic fried chicken remains at the core of this fast food concept with the fried chicken sandwich still being the favored menu item, the brand has started to develop six grab-and-go retail products that are currently featured at some Whole Food locations in Northern California.

This fast food joint has grown to 10 locations in just a little over three years. However, Welton believes that when she looks back at the brand’s history one day she’ll say that the “breakout moment” for The Organic Coup came once it opened a concession shop at a major sports venue like Oracle Park (formerly known as the AT&T Park), home of the San Francisco Giants.

We’re at the “San Francisco Giants ballpark and of course that was not part of the business plan, not a part of our original thought process...,” says Welton. “but, the San Francisco Giants, they had so many fan requests... requesting organic, clean, healthy food... food that they can feel good about eating… and some of their executives had been eating in our San Francisco location and so they brought us over.”

This lead The Organic Coup to later open at the Levi’s Stadium, home of the 49ers. In the last game of the season— during the College National Championship Game— the brand ended up closing as the No. 1 concession stand for the stadium making $37,000 in just four hours.

Check out the video above to learn more about what sets this fast food concept apart to get a clue to their success!

As Interest in Ethnic Food Rises, Filipino QSR Chain Jollibee Plans Aggressive Expansion

As Interest in Ethnic Food Rises, Filipino QSR Chain Jollibee Plans Aggressive Expansion

If you haven’t already heard about this Filipino fast-food chain, then you’re sure to run into one in North America within the next five years.

It’s called Jollibee and it’s set to open 100 stores in Canada within the next half-decade. As reported by The Canadian Press, the company “is eyeing the wave of new locations because the country is a key growth market and a big part of its North American expansion plans.”

Ethnic food, especially from the Philippines, was predicted to be a top trend for 2018, as Foodable reported in the past. It looks like Canada is really embracing this trend ever since Jollibee entered the market in 2016. The fast-food brand is exploring Ontario, Edmonton, Calgary, and Vancouver to further expansion plans.

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Will Startup Hungry Planet™ Gain Momentum After Recent Success in a California School District?

Will Startup Hungry Planet™ Gain Momentum After Recent Success in a California School District?

A California school district began to offer plant-based meals across all their cafeterias this past academic year and had students choose whether or not they wanted to eat them based on taste. “The initiative was so successful, the meals will likely be offered again next year,” reports KEYT.

We’ve heard about companies like Impossible Food and Beyond Meat making their way in restaurants, but the Santa Barbara Unified School District actually sourced her plant-based protein from a startup based out of Missouri. It’s called Hungry Planet™.

According to the company’s website, it focuses on creating an alternative protein to ground beef, chicken, pork, Italian sausage, chorizo sausage, and crab for culinary professionals to use as a 1:1 substitution in innovative entrees. The company says it develops its faux meats to delight the demanding tastes of meat lovers in the heart of the Midwest.

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Will a Themed-Restaurant Drive-In Propel Tesla Forward?

Will a Themed-Restaurant Drive-In Propel Tesla Forward?

It looks like Elon Musk is actually following through with his “old school drive-in, roller skates & rock restaurant” idea that he had shared on Twitter earlier this year. (Still, no hints about what a rock restaurant is—perhaps he meant a rock ‘n’ roll-themed restaurant?)

Anyhow, according to “The Drive,” this new restaurant drive-in for Tesla drivers will be located on an old Volvo dealership in Santa Monica, Ca. since “a new application popped up on the City of Santa Monica’s ePermits site, specifically for a ‘Tesla restaurant and supercharger station.’”

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