Win Tailgating Season With These Chef-Inspired Recipes

Win Tailgating Season With These Chef-Inspired Recipes

Let's face it!

Tailgating is not done the same way your father and grandpa used to do it back in their day. Modern tailgating is more than just grilling cheap burgers and cracking a few beers open behind the trunk of your neighbor's pickup truck.

Now, it's about who can throw the most elaborate pre-game celebration with gourmet food options and trendy food stations.

The most extreme example of fancy tailgates would probably have to be Michael Mina's 49ers Tailgate Experience, but we are not all James Beard Award-winning chefs with stadium restaurants, are we?

Lucky for you The Melting Pot's corporate chef, Jason Miller, shared with Foodable four booze-infused fondue recipes that are sure to crown you as the King or Queen of Tailgates this football season. Remember, winter is coming and you still have until February to show off your skills at your next pre-game celebration. Why not do it with a warm beer or liquor-infused cheese fondue?

Check out the delicious recipes, below. Don't be afraid to get creative!

Read More

5 Tips on Engineering the Right Menu for Your Restaurant

5 Tips on Engineering the Right Menu for Your Restaurant

By Jim Berman, Foodable Industry Expert

The restaurant menu is the singular most important element of any operation. Yet, it is often relegated to a half-hearted (or misguided) effort at best, and a comical jab at juggling food cost at worst. Where is the logic? Food is the product of any restaurant. So why give such little thought to the device that describes, sells, and advertises your product?

I was just working with a friend getting ready to open his restaurant. Six months of renovating an existing property, he worked nothing short of a miracle being victorious at navigating the license and permits minefield. Amazing at creating a dazzling dining room and even designing an alluring logo for the restaurant signage at the entry, the forthcoming soft opening is but a few days away. I asked about the menu. His response? “Well, we’ll print something in house or send something to the printer.”

Read More

What a Farmer Can Teach a Chef

What a Farmer Can Teach a Chef

The Conundrum

I was working at a large resort a few years ago, killing the prep list for our New Year’s celebration. Running up to the last several hours before execution, I found myself in front of a six-foot griddle getting ready to sear off two thousand U10 scallops. As I started popping the lids off of the containers, I was amazed at how beautifully uniform every single one was. I set myself to the task at hand as my mind began to wander, imagining what it must have taken to have harvested and sorted all of the scallops. Had it been a labor of love or just another shipment to get out?

Earlier in the morning, as I walked into the prep kitchen to rally the crew, I was taken aback at the pallets and hand trucks stacked with the product for the event. When one is prepping for a thousand people, it doesn’t leave much room for reflection, yet I wondered — more than once that day — where had all of this stuff come from? Had factory farms and ranches been involved or did some product represent smaller operations? How much had come from our partners in the adjacent valley or did it even matter? My thoughts at that moment were more practical than romantic; there were mouths to feed, after all, and purveyors to thank.

Read More

Chefs Share Their Three Favorite Techniques in the Kitchen

Chefs Share Their Three Favorite Techniques in the Kitchen

By Kerri Adams, Editor-at-Large

If every chef cooked the same, the culinary industry wouldn’t be the diverse one it is today.

There are so many different techniques a chef can choose to use in their kitchen and let’s face it, each culinary mastermind has their favorites.

We decided to ask chefs from all over the country the same question to see what methods they rely on the most. Check out what these stellar chefs had to say. 

What are three techniques in the kitchen that you couldn't cook without?

James Knappett, head chef of London’s Kitchen Table:

  1. Cooking over charcoal. We use pure English wood at Kitchen Table, it’s very interesting to see the changes of flavour that charcoal brings, naturally changing the characteristics of vegetables and meat with that flavour.
  2. Pickling is one of our big techniques – we find that the best part of this method is being able to use vegetables later on in the year when they aren’t naturally in season. Through thinking ahead and clever preparation and organization, this opens up a wider range of vegetables to us all year round. Another element of preservation that we use at Kitchen Table, is the use of high acidity vinegar. If you make the vinegars to a high enough acidity, raw carrots for example, have actually been broken down through fermentation process and been cooked in the vinegar – a taste that most of our guests haven’t experienced before.
  3. Roasting in the pan. We cook everything we can in the pan. It’s a traditional method, using thyme, garlic, bay leaves and butter and is sometimes seen as an old school way compared to sous-vide cookery. It is one of the first techniques you learn as a chef, and is still very much present in Kitchen Table's method of cooking.
Read More