Why Whiskey Distillers are Ramping up the Production of Bottled-in-Bond Spirits

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The craft movement encompasses so much more than beer, consumers are also gravitating to craft spirits.

This has fueled a spike in the production of bottle-in-bond spirits. The term bottle-in-bond means that the American-made distilled beverage has been aged, bottled, and deemed authentic liquor by the federal government, according to standards outlined in the Bottled-in-Bond Act of 1897.

“At the time, whiskey was largely sold in barrels or jugs which had questionable provenance,” said Susan Wahl, group product director for Heaven Hill, to "VinePair."

Back in the day, producers used to taint spirits with filler additives.

“In effect, it was America’s first consumer protection law, predating the Pure Food and Drug Act,” said Wahl.

These bottle-in-bond whiskeys are higher quality and higher proof. But it's an investment for the producer considering how long it has to be aged for.

"The Bottled-In-Bond Act stipulated that the whiskey must be the product of one distilling season from one distillery, aged in a federally bonded warehouse for at least four years, and bottled at 100 proof," writes "VinePair."

But its proven to be worth the wait since the sales are up for these spirits.

"Bottled-in-bond shows that a whiskey has been completely, lovingly made ‘in-house,’ which sets it apart from people who are just blending-bottling," said Scott Harris, Catoctin Creek founder and general manager.

These spirits hold their own in flavorful hand-crafted cocktails too.

With all of that in mind, spirit producers are rolling on more bottle-in-bond spirits like Jack Daniel's Bottled-in-Bond Tennessee Whiskey and Kings County Bottled-in-Bond Bourbon. All of New Riff Distilling spirits are bottled-in-bond.

Learn more about these types of spirits and the newly popular brands at " VinePair" now.

Speaking of craft spirits, looking for American-made cocktail recipes to spice up your bar menu? Check out this recent episode of the Foodable Smart Kitchen & Bar, where master mixologist, Oscar Castaneda demonstrates how to make these classic cocktails but with a twist.

Aperol Spritz is the Cocktail of the Summer and Here's Why

You may have noticed more orange and fizzy beverages on restaurant tables. Aperol Spritz, which was created back in 1919 in Italy, has quickly become the drink of the summer. 

But this wasn't done by accident. 

"Last month, Campari America marketing executive Melanie Batchelor told The New York Times that the company made a concerted effort to draw the American palate to the drink, starting a few years ago. Those efforts included booths at New York City summer events such as the Jazz Age Lawn Party and the Governors Ball, as well as events in the Hamptons, Los Angeles, and Palm Springs," writes "VinePair."

The recipe usually includes Aperol, Prosecco or some type of sparkling wine, and soda. It's refreshing, so it's perfect for summertime. 

Not to mention, it photographs nicely., which makes it attractive for the Instagram-loving foodie who wants to show off their summer-themed beverage. 

The recipe is also easy to adjust and get creative with. Making it not only attractive to diners but also to bartenders.

“The traditional Aperol Spritz is a very forgiving cocktail, in that if you are eyeballing the measurements instead of measuring it out exactly, you’ll still have a tasty drink once you’re done pouring,” said Clair McLafferty, a bartender and author of “The Classic & Craft Cocktail Recipe Book" to "VinePair." “Home bartenders should feel free to adjust it to their own personal taste. Every human has a different palate, and what is attractive to me may be disgusting to you.”

It can be served on tap, so bartenders can serve the beverage quickly. 

Want to see how other restaurants are getting creative with their Aperol Spritz beverages?

Read more at "VinePair" now.