Why are CBD Edibles Being Pulled Off Restaurants in Some Parts of the Country?

Across various parts of the country, health department officials are asking restaurants to voluntarily pull CBD-infused foods and drinks off menus.

The latest local and regional governments that have reportedly taken steps against CBD are New York City, California, Texas, and Ohio banning the substance from restaurants and retail stores.

For example, according to the New York City’s official government website, beginning July 1, New York City restaurants that don’t comply with the CBD ban voluntarily could be embargoed of their CBD products by the health department... and by October 1, officials “will begin issuing violations to restaurants and retailers for offering CBD-laced foods and drinks. Violations may be subject to fines as well as violation points that count toward the establishment’s letter grade.”

CBD, or cannabidiol, which derives from cannabis, doesn’t cause the psychoactive effects for the lack of enough THC—the compound that gives people the “high” sensation.

In fact, CBD proponents claim the substance is mainly used for its therapeutic benefits helping people relax, ease pain, anxiety, insomnia, and even depression.

Despite the fact that not many studies have been done on cannabidiol in human trials, as pointed out by a recent New York Times article, we are seeing an immense amount of CBD products being sold across the country, with Walgreens as the latest retailer to announce plans to sell creams, patches, and sprays in nearly 1,500 stores in select states.

So, why is it being pulled out of the restaurant space, specifically?

Although, the farm bill that was passed in December 2018 legalized industrial hemp in the U.S., this only means industrial hemp was removed from the controlled substance category. Anything that is put in foods and drinks has to be regulated by the Food and Drug Administration and, as of right now, CBD is not determined safe or effective for other health conditions aside from being an active ingredient in an approved drug that treats two rare and severe forms of epilepsy.

The FDA regulations are something different and there’s a huge push from lawmakers to change this.

Since there is no federal law specifically addressing CBD-laced edibles, some states, like Colorado and Maine, have already attempted to clarify the status of the substance by passing laws allowing the addition of CBD to food, as reported by Reuters. California and Texas have introduced bi-partisan legislation to do the same, as reported by the Associated Press.

Last week, the FDA slated the first public hearing to take place May 31 to discuss how to regulate CBD food and beverage products.

In the meantime, here at Foodable, we are tracking the latest in this arena:

In a podcast episode of Chef AF, Chef Brandon Foster shares with us a personal anecdote about how CBD has positively affected a local farmer to The point where this person wanted to dedicate the rest of his available land to grow hemp for the CBD industry.

In an On Foodable Feature episode, our host Layla Harrison breaks down for our audience some of the CBD-infused products that have stood out from the rest.

And in a Barron Report podcast episode, we learned about Azuca— a company offering CBD and THC products ranging from edibles to sweet syrups.

We expect to continue hearing about ‘Culinary Cannabis’ and its impact on the restaurant business and society as a whole. so, stay tuned for more interesting content!

Culinary Cannabis with The Herb Somm, Jamie Evans

Cannabis is introducing a whole new aspect of the restaurant industry. With the emergence of some of the most renowned chefs beginning the process of developing menu items related to CBD and Cannabis, to CBD taking the lead currently in the approval process via the recently approved $867 billion Farm Bill which allows for use of CDB in food-related items. What we are seeing is a massive early adoption to integrated food and menu concepts by restaurants and experts around the US. I get a chance to explore the idea of tasting and pairing Cannabis related items with food and wine with Jamie Evans, the Herb Somm as we discover new aspects to the integration and new age of unique ingredients.

I continue to be surprised in the advancements of ingredients, flavors and culinary techniques that chefs are integrating every year, but 2019 seems to be the year of Cannabis and will surely be a major campaign topic in the upcoming 2020 presidential election. A small or possibly huge setback is the recent banning of CBD products by restaurants in NYC. However, this action is not without a fight when you consider Andrea Drummer. Drummer, a former drug counselor turned definitive expert on edibles and cannabis is pushing back on the bizarre circumstances that have led to CBD being banned as a food additive, even as its legality has been firmly established. It appears that this new form of creativity in food will face a bit more in the way of challenges this year.

Stay tuned as I continue to explore this critical time in the evolution of culinary creativity to understand where we are really going with the future of Cannabis. Will this be a new era in similarity to when alcohol products began showing up in menu items at restaurants around the world or is it a fight that will be forthcoming for years to come?

Video Produced by:

Nathan Mikita

Nathan Mikita

Director of New Media/Producer


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