How to Adopt the Flavors of Japan

How to Adopt the Flavors of Japan

Guests are increasingly adventurous with the help of social media, which is educating and luring guests to establishments that are offering delightful new flavors. These flavors comfort, intrigue, and perhaps confuse a little–all at the same time.

Adopting the flavors of Japan, even when used in non-traditional ways, is a way to offer guests an authentic flavor that satisfies and doesn’t have to add much to existing food costs.

Here’s some ways you can incorporate these flavors into your menu

Umami is Still In

Umami flavors are still exploding, and they are going to continue to surge as guests’ demand for certain food changes.

The increase in diets that exclude animal protein provide enough reason to be ahead of the curve and understand the flavors that guests will be demanding. Flexitarians are looking for a plant-heavy diet, while veganism grows to 6% of U.S. consumers, according to Report Buyer.

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No Rules in Dining: What Big Trends Will We See Next?

No Rules in Dining: What Big Trends Will We See Next?

By Jim Berman, Foodable Industry Expert

Upscale chefs playing down-scale roles. Fast-fooding of the eclectic palate. What is next for this "No Rules" era of dining? Edison lights, shrunken menus, refreshingly loud music, and shareable plates are de rigueur. So, where are you going?

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Now Trending: Pickled and Fermented Foods

Now Trending: Pickled and Fermented Foods

By Courtney WalshWest Coast Editor

A staple element of many European, Asian, African and Middle Eastern culinary traditions, pickled and fermented ingredients are just now starting to make their way into a wide range of restaurants nationwide. From accoutrements to integration in cocktail programs, pickling has become all the rage for U.S. chefs and mixologists alike, with many restaurants choosing to initiate house-made pickling programs as well as experimenting with unique vinegars and nontraditional pickling ingredients with which to work with.

Below, we explore restaurants in three major cities that are spearheading this trend.

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Goodwich Kiosk to Transform into Culinary Incubator

Goodwich Kiosk  | Steve Marcus

Goodwich Kiosk | Steve Marcus

After award-winning sandwich shop Goodwich closed its doors, leaving its former parking lot kiosk station for a new location, many locals were upset at losing both such an outstanding concept as well as not having anything to replace it with. Luckily, the owners of the Goodwich have recently announced plans to revive the space, introducing local Vegas residents to a new style of eatery: a culinary incubator. 

Becoming more and more popular nationwide, this incubator kitchen will operate much like others in which new chefs are able to utilize the space as a testing ground before opening their own brick and mortar. Chefs can rent the space for time periods of up to three months, during which time they are able to establish a culinary reputation as well as potentially attract investors.  

“The concept is going to evolve into something where we can showcase local talent and chefs with an idea of something they want to try but don’t have a place to do it,” Goodwich proprietor Josh Clark explained to Las Vegas Weekly.

Learn more about the upcoming culinary incubator here

Chefs Chime in On: Genetically Modified and Cloned Meat

Chefs Chime in On: Genetically Modified and Cloned Meat

By Courtney Walsh, West Coast Editor

The culinary world is constantly in flux, with new developments and innovations appearing every day. In this series, we offer chefs the opportunity to share their own unique insights into a culinary trend currently making headlines.

As the world’s population continues to grow, new efforts are needed to respond to the environmental impact of the meat industry. While many have attempted to address this growing issue by lessening meat consumption by emphasizing other seasonal and sustainably grown alternatives, others have taken to what have been criticized as "less than natural" methods to attempt to satiate the growing demand for meat.

Earlier last year, headlines began appearing reporting on the emergence of genetically modified meat and seafood. The modification process entails species having DNA material manipulated in order to speed up their maturation process, thereby lessening the time needed to raise each animal before slaughter. The theory is that this quicker raising time period would have less of an environmental impact as well as a more immediate economic return for the farmer.

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