Female Artisans Discuss: Proper Leadership Being Key To Move Past The #MeToo Movement

Female Artisans Discuss: Proper Leadership Being Key To Move Past The #MeToo Movement
  • The #MeToo movement is making positive changes in the restaurant industry.

  • Women are moving forward in an male-led industry and empowering women and men alike.

    The #MeToo movement has shone a light on the unhealthy culture not unique to, but definitely prevalent in, the restaurant industry. With women making up about 51.8 percent of the industry, there comes a shift in what was once a predominately male led space. Take a listen for an empowering discussion about the future of female artisans making a difference in the restaurant industry.



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The Female Chefs Reigning Over the Culinary Industry

The Female Chefs Reigning Over the Culinary Industry

By Kerri Adams, Editor-at-Large

Out of the top 100 on our Social Chefs list, 15 are women. 

This just demonstrates that restaurant kitchens are still dominated by the male sex. Not to mention, male chefs earn an average of 28.1% more than female chefs, according to Glassdoor.

But, why is that? Is it an issue of sexism in the kitchen? Or is it that women often have to pick between advancing their careers or having children?

Nonetheless, the world is changing and now there is a new generation of female super star chefs who are changing the culinary landscape for the better.

So, we decided to highlight some of the top ladies on our list.

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Small Kingdoms: How Francophile Chef Suzanne Goin Continues to Dazzle West Coast Foodies

Small Kingdoms: How Francophile Chef Suzanne Goin Continues to Dazzle West Coast Foodies

By Kerri Adams, Editor-at-Large

A chef is so much more than a culinary mastermind in the kitchen. Our Top 100 Social Chefs feature artisans who have developed a brand and many of them showcase this with multiple different concepts.

One of the top chefs and leading ladies on this list is Suzanne Goin. 

Goin was born in LA and food was always part of her life as her parents were “food-obsessed” Francophiles (a person who is fond of or greatly admires France or the French.)

 

 

She eventually made her way over to the east coast and graduated from Brown University. After working at some of the most highly acclaimed restaurants in the country, including working as executive chef at Campanie in LA, she decided to start her own venture with her business partner Caroline Styne.

Together they opened Lucques in West Hollywood in 1998 and it was an instant success, so much so that Goin was recognized a year later as one of Food and Wine Magazine’s Best New Chefs.

Goin did not stop there though. This was just the beginning of her small kingdom.

In 2002, both Goin and Styne opened an entirely different concept, a.o.c. (which notoriously lands at No. 1 on Foodable’s LA Top 25 Restaurants) known for its small plate menu and perfect wine pairings. The restaurant was the inspiration for Goin’s second book, The A.O.C Cookbook, which features seasonal recipes by Goin and wine notes from Styne.

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How Restaurateurs Can Help Close the Gender Gap in the Restaurant Industry

According to data from Glassdoor, male chefs earn an average of 28.1% more than female chefs. 

This is partially due to the fact that pregnant and new mothers can't take extended unpaid leave because benefit packages tend to be limited in the restaurant industry. 

Danny Meyer has always been ahead of the game, first with establishing the no-tipping policy, and now he has announced that new parents, whether they be women, men or domestic partners, working for his restaurant group will be given an extended benefits package to cover paid leave.

If other restaurants adopt a similar program, this will help close the gender gap in the industry. Since women often have to pick between advancing their careers or having children– this has inevitably created a male dominated restaurant world. 

But with industry leaders like Meyer paving the way, other restaurants are bound to follow suit.

So what does the extended benefits package by Union Square Hospitality Group offer employees at the group's 14 restaurants?

"All full time employees in the front and back of the house with more than one year of employment will be offered 100 percent of their base wages for the first four weeks after their child is born or adopted. After that, all employees will be offered 60 percent of their base wages for the next four weeks," writes "Eater."

The package will be available to employees who qualify starting in 2017. 

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