How Seeds&Chips Is Building A Platform For Food Innovation

Consumers are rapidly changing the focus of the restaurant and specialty food industry. With the global population expected to reach 9.8 billion over the next 30 years, Gen Y and Gen Z are investing their time, money, and energy into finding foods that are good for them and good for the planet.

New ingredients, additives, and sources of food have seen massive growth. Plant-based foods, alternative proteins, and healthy halo snacks are just a few of the key categories within the projected $5 billion plant-based market in 2020. Alternative sugars and salts, as well as an increase in fermentation and food recycling practices, are all part of a global movement to grow food more efficiently and sustainably.

On the latest episode of The Barron Report, host Paul Barron chats with Sharon Cittone, the chief content officer of Seeds&Chips, to discuss how food innovation and agtech are changing the global farming industry.

First envisioned as an event, Seeds&Chips has evolved into a company that connects innovators with global policymakers, startups, speakers, and accelerators to effect change in food culture and advance the possibilities of agtech. The company will hold a summit featuring global food visionaries first in Melbourne, Australia this September, and later in its hometown Milan in May 2020.

“Consumers are leading the way in wanting to be kind to the planet,” says Cittone. “The mission is to bring innovators around the world together to find practical solutions through collaboration and cooperation. We want to make sure there is healthy, safe, and efficient food for everyone.”

The movement will likely face some uphill battles in the years ahead. As Cittone acknowledges, “innovation is growing so rapidly, and policy is lagging behind. As much as we innovate, our global policies can’t keep up.”

Listen to the episode above to learn more about the challenges within the food innovation movement and the future of Seeds&Chips. To binge listen to the Barron Report check us out on iTunes Now!

Research by:

Paul Barron

Paul Barron

Editor-in-Chief/Executive Producer


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The Latest in Food Innovation Trends

Today’s most creative restaurants keep guests coming back for more. They are always pushing the envelope or keeping the guests on their toes with food innovations.

On the IOChangeMakers live stream, we sat down with three food innovators– Jeff Drake, CEO of Protein Bar, Diana Dávila, chef and owner of Mi Tocaya Antojera and Zach Engel, executive chef and Owner of Galit to see how they are constantly keeping things exciting at their restaurants.

As Chef Dávila points out the culinary landscape is much more diverse today. The European structure is being broken down. Instead, chefs are embracing their cultural backgrounds.

"I find that in my kitchen people have to unlearn what they know about cooking in general because the European structure doesn't fit the Mexican techniques," says Dávila.

Chef Engel helms the kitchen at Galit, where the dining experience is also much different from the traditional European structure. The Middle Eastern restaurant in Chicago has two menus.

"We have the menu and on the back is what we call the other menu. The other menu is four-courses, it's not like a boujie prix fixe menu with tasting portions and all that, it's family style. This is the concept of how we want people to experience cuisine. We want you to have a giant meal with bread, hummus, Salatin, and all sorts of plates with big entrees with bold grains," says Engel.

Jeff Drake, on the other hand, is a food innovator in the fast casual segment. This sector has been disrupting the traditional culinary structure for years.

Protein Bar was a pioneer in the segment by serving unique ingredients guests couldn't get anywhere else, but now with the saturated market, the concept has had to up its game.

"When Matt the founder started Protein Bar, he was one of the first people to put quinoa on the menu. When he put quinoa on the menu 10 years ago, people didn't know what it was or how to say it.," says Drake. "Over the last 2.5 years, we have gotten back to focusing on ingredients and bringing interesting ingredients or boosts onto our menu."

Want more insights from these food innovators? Check out the video above or the full interview is also now exclusively available on Foodable On-Demand here.