Peapod and FarmLogix: Exploring the Future of Food Tech

Peapod and FarmLogix: Exploring the Future of Food Tech

On this special episode of The Barron Report recorded at Foodable.io, brought to you by Kabbage, we get to discuss how technology has become the core backbone of how we reach, interact, and exchange info with our customers. In this episode, Guest Host Donald Burns navigates us through this discussion of where technology could take the industry over the next decade. How will online, mobile, Social, AR and more affect the business of the future?

Joining Donald are two food businesses who, while aren’t technology companies, rely on technology to move their businesses forward.

Carrie Bienkowski of online grocery delivery company Peapod is showing Americans how they can shop smarter, save time and money, and find the foods they want in order to eat better. Using their online platform, customers are able to fill and adjust their carts all with the tap of a finger.

Meanwhile, Linda Mallers, CEO and President of FarmLogix discusses how their company is a company transforming the local and sustainable food supply chain by connecting buyers to producers with technology and sustainability expertise.

Watch the episode above to see how these businesses are leveraging technology in their daily lives as well as how they predict tech to impact the industry.

Read More

Google-Backed, Veggie Milk Could Have Lowest Eco-Footprint in Dairy Industry

Google-Backed, Veggie Milk Could Have Lowest Eco-Footprint in Dairy Industry

You’ve heard of alternative milk made from soy, almond, coconut and rice… but have you heard of a plant-based milk made from yellow peas?

That’s right!

Ripple, a startup backed by $44 million from Google and venture capitalists from Silicon Valley is selling alternative milk that not only has a clean taste, but also has just as much protein as that made from cows, reports “Bloomberg.”

It’s perfect timing since Foodable recently reported that there may be a milk shortage, or at least a milk price hike, due to globalization.

Alternative milk might just be the solution, especially if it’s eco-friendly and high in protein.

Read More

The Challenging Future of On-demand Food Delivery: Will Amazon Conquer this Segment too?

The Challenging Future of On-demand Food Delivery: Will Amazon Conquer this Segment too?

By Kerri Adams, Editor-at-Large

The initial rapid success of on-demand food delivery platforms influenced hundreds of entrepreneurs and investors to gravitate to this segment. Many of these food tech start-ups started off well-funded, but quickly the market became crowded with so many options for consumers to choose from. With the fierce competition in today’s digitally-driven market, these food tech companies are having trouble surviving.

Ultimately, this challenging time will either make or break the biggest food delivery services in the industry. There are some major players left in the game, but which one will emerge as the “Uber” of on-demand food delivery? Will it be PostMates, DoorDash, GrubHub, Caviar or Amazon?

The Beginning

In 2003, on-demand services were seen as revolutionary. Apple was at the forefront of this service when it launched the iTunes Store. Netflix launched its on-demand movie and TV show platform in 2007. Amazon cornered the e-book on-demand market starting in 2008 and Uber launched in 2009 with on-demand transportation services.

The restaurant industry was late in the game. PostMates launched in 2011, but the focus was on local goods, not restaurant delivery. Then GrubHub and Seamless merged to offer food delivery services in 2013.

Read More