Food Out Loud: GMO Questions and Answers

The use of GMOs has been a hotbed issue in the U.S. for many decades and there are strong concerns happening on both sides of the conversation. For me historically, I have been against GMOs , I have taking part in protests and advocated against the spread of GMOs in our food ecosystem. But, working here at Foodable, I am often questioned on why I feel they way I do. Sometimes I simply do not have all the answers.  I realized that when it came to GMOs I was in a bit of an echo chamber, only talking to people who were on my side of the argument. So I started to think about what I didn’t know.

One of the biggest arguments for GMOs is the idea that we need them to feed a growing population. I realized that I don't understand enough about what it takes to feed the world, let alone what it will take to feed future generations. I also did not know exactly what was considered a GMO and how present they are in the food we eat every day.

With that in mind,  I decided that I wanted to try to find someone who was an advocate of GMOs to ask them some of the basic questions that I just simply do not have the answers to.

In this episode, I speak with Leia Flure, a GMO advocate who writes for a site called “GMO Answers.” Leia is a registered dietitian based in Champaign, Illinois. She is also an educator, has a psychology and a nutritional science degree, and is a mother - so she has to truly believe that GMOs are safe and useful. And that was what I was looking for. Someone who did not have a horse in the game, someone who did their own research and came to their own conclusions based on her own research and education. She has decided to write for “GMO Answers,” which is a partially funded by GMO companies, but her conclusions are her own.

If there is a takeaway for me from this discussion it is that we may have to separate the science from the practices of some of these companies. We all know the case of Dewayne Johnson vs. Monsanto and how that turned out. Of course, this validates a lot of my viewpoints on GMOs and the damage they can cause to people and the environment. So does the bad really outweigh the good?

This podcast may upset some hardcore proponents against GMOs and I get it, I didn't dig in and barrage my guest with rage against some of the points that I don't necessarily agree because it’s important to keep an open dialogue. But rest assured this is not a topic that I am done exploring because it is not a topic that we have come to final conclusions on. So please shoot me an email or a tweet and let me know what questions you have and I will continue this conversation.

Research by:

Nathan Mikita

Nathan Mikita

Director of New Media/Producer


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Are Meat-Free Delicatessens The Next Big Thing In Foodservice?

If 2018 wasn't 2019 will be the year of the vegan, and we should all be excited about that. Because whether you agree with it or not we all need to have more vegetables on our plates. Vegans are merely pushing the food industry to get better and challenging non-vegans to think about their food an where it comes from and what the costs are to our environment and our health.

Atlas is a Meat-Free Delicatessen that provides healthy and nutritious plant-based food, without losing sight of why people enjoy comfort food and their food quality and flavors are taking the Miami market by storm.

I got the unique opportunity to meet the founders of Atlas Meat-Free Delicatessen Ryan and Amanda Bauhaus, and to try some of their food. Their backgrounds are not in food, but these two came together as a couple, and embarked on a mission to bring delicious vegan food to the vegan or vegetarian curious.

Ryan and Amanda are aware of the stigmas the vegans have come to represent and have formulated their brand to make sure they were not preaching to people but rather inspiring people, and they are inspiring people with great food.

Ryan and Amanda call their food "low food tech" - From buttermilk fried chicken to mozzarella cheese, This is real food made through careful experimentation to make vegan food accessible, delicious, and familiar.

Show Notes

  • 14:26 - Does the word vegan have a negative connotation?

  • 19:26 - Let the food speak for itself

  • 43:13 - Ryan? Are you a mad scientist?

  • 1:50 - Meat :) Ryan and Amanda Baubaus, founders of Atlas Meat-Free Delicatessen.

  • 4:43 - Becoming Vegans

  • 10:54 - How did the idea of Atlas come about?


Research by:

Nathan Mikita

Nathan Mikita

Director of New Media/Producer


VIEW BIO

Food Tech and Incubators Are All The Rage

Food Tech and Incubators Are All The Rage
  • Food technology is creating a space for more brands and restaurants to become innovative in how they meet consumer demand.

  • Being innovative means being able to understand your consumers’ needs and providing a unique solution.

Food technology has had one of the largest impacts on the foodservice industry since social media.

In this episode, Host Bill Bender unpacks with the panelists what exactly innovation in the foodservice industry means and how it can either improve or hamper the growth of the industry.

Is this a fad or a complete shift in the model of how food innovation will occur in the future? Take a listen for more insights on how technology is innovating how we meet consumers’ needs.


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Yeast Will be Instrumental In The Next Level of Food Tech

Yeast Will be Instrumental In The Next Level of Food Tech

Earlier this year, Foodable reported on products from companies like Beyond Meat, which is looking to replace animal meat by using a plant-based product for its Beyond Burgers, and Ripple, which is a company offering a milk-like product strictly made out of peas. Those are just a couple of examples of a larger move towards plant-based or alternative protein.

Thanks to the low costs on biotech tools, a handful of startups, mainly concentrated around the Bay Area, are “using a biotech process called fermentation to make animal products,” reports “Fortune.”

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