Yeast Will be Instrumental In The Next Level of Food Tech

Yeast Will be Instrumental In The Next Level of Food Tech

Earlier this year, Foodable reported on products from companies like Beyond Meat, which is looking to replace animal meat by using a plant-based product for its Beyond Burgers, and Ripple, which is a company offering a milk-like product strictly made out of peas. Those are just a couple of examples of a larger move towards plant-based or alternative protein.

Thanks to the low costs on biotech tools, a handful of startups, mainly concentrated around the Bay Area, are “using a biotech process called fermentation to make animal products,” reports “Fortune.”

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Google-Backed, Veggie Milk Could Have Lowest Eco-Footprint in Dairy Industry

Google-Backed, Veggie Milk Could Have Lowest Eco-Footprint in Dairy Industry

You’ve heard of alternative milk made from soy, almond, coconut and rice… but have you heard of a plant-based milk made from yellow peas?

That’s right!

Ripple, a startup backed by $44 million from Google and venture capitalists from Silicon Valley is selling alternative milk that not only has a clean taste, but also has just as much protein as that made from cows, reports “Bloomberg.”

It’s perfect timing since Foodable recently reported that there may be a milk shortage, or at least a milk price hike, due to globalization.

Alternative milk might just be the solution, especially if it’s eco-friendly and high in protein.

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Why These Food Tech Companies Failed

Why These Food Tech Companies Failed

By Kerri Adams, Editor-at-Large

Five years ago, it seemed like every entrepreneur wanted a piece of the food tech pie. Once PostMates launched in 2011 and GrubHub and Seamless merged in 2013, thousands of food-focused technology companies were on the lookout for funding.

The future looked bright as many of these companies raised millions. Fast forward to 2016, several of these well-funded startups have been forced to throw in the towel.

But, why did these companies fail in the first place? Especially when many of which seemed to be on track to succeed?

SpoonRocket 

This on-demand pre-made meal delivery startup announced in mid-march that it was closing up shop. Although the company had raised $13.5 million, it wasn’t enough to fund the costs to continue operating. 

So, why couldn’t SpoonRocket stay afloat?

The Fierce Competition 

By 2016, SpoonRocket was one of the many on-demand food delivery services on the market. DoorDash, PostMates, Caviar, GrubHub and even Amazon were rapidly spreading to different cities. 

Investors interested in the third-party delivery sector had more options to choose from.

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