How FoodLogiQ Had a Role In Helping Small Businesses Through the Romaine Lettuce Scare

In this episode of On Foodable, Paul Barron sits down with Bryan Cohn, Food Safety Solution Engineer at FoodLogiQ, at the Winter Fancy Food Show in San Francisco. The two chat about food safety compliance, whole chain traceability, and supply chain transparency solutions.

Cohn does a good job at explaining how FoodLogiQ works with businesses to accomplish its mission of mapping out the world’s supply chain to promote food safety and traceability.

“What FoodLogiQ is able to do is... automate their work flows, meaning being able to get documentation of suppliers, ingredients, products into a cloud system so they can be shared across organizations and then decisions can be made,” says Cohn.

One of the most recent food safety issues that FoodLogiQ had a role to play in had to do the with the recent Romaine Lettuce scare.

“Some of our clients leveraged our technology to understand where Romaine was within their respective supply chains,” Cohn shared with Paul. Thanks to FoodLogiQ, its clients were able to “justify their supply chain and their product path and journey.”

Companies like Tyson Foods and Subway have invested in the software firm hoping that more suppliers jump on board and begin to digitize their paperwork in order to have everything organized in one cloud.

To learn more about FoodLogiQ it’s processes and what challenges they face, check out the video above!

Video Produced by:

Vanessa Rodriguez

Vanessa Rodriguez

Writer & Producer


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Big Food is Fostering Innovation

Large corporations have been noticing how consumers have been favoring products made by independent startup food companies, since a good chunk of those provide craft, high-quality, niche, and, a lot of times, healthier products.

Needless to say, big food wants in. Especially, since this specialty food segment has a tremendous growth potential.

So, how is big food seeking innovation?

Companies like Campbell Soup, Chobani, Kellogg, Kraft Heinz, Nestlé, PepsiCo, and Tyson Foods are creating innovation centers and/or partnering with existing incubators to help niche brands grow and flourish.

PepsiCo

Pepsico’s new center for innovation is called “The Hive.”

According to Food Dive, “this incubator will be a separate entrepreneurial group outside of the core headquarters that will help nurture niche products already in the portfolio,” like for example Stubborn Soda.

As Foodable has reported in the past, PepsiCo also partnered with a Chicago-based, food and beverage incubator, The Hatchery, in order to look at other startup brands that have the potential of becoming a possible venture for the beverage giant.

Tyson Foods

Earlier this year, Tyson Foods announced that it will be working with two incubators—Plug and Play and 1871—linking the food giant to innovation hailing from Silicon Valley and Chicago.

That’s not the first time Tyson showed it’s commitment for innovation. In fact, the company launched a venture capital fund in late 2016 “to invest in companies developing breakthrough technologies, business models and products to sustainably feed the growing world population,” according to the company website.

Since then, Tyson has invested in brands like for example Beyond Meat, that promote sustainability and others that promote the internet of food, like FoodLogiq.

Tyson is spearheading innovation through its own brand, ¡Yappah!, which aims to fight food waste by utilizing “forgotten” ingredients like rescued vegetable puree and spent grain to make protein crisps, and investments in companies like Future Meat Technologies, an Israel-based “biotechnology company aiming to transform global meat production through distributive manufacturing of fat and muscle cells, increasing food safety and reducing ecological impact worldwide,” as stated in the company’s website.

Chobani

Chobani is another company looking to foster innovation through its Food Tech Residency. The company set out specific challenges in the food and agriculture value chain they would like to tackle (like food waste, food safety, water conservation, logistics, etc.) and invites like-minded, early-stage tech and agriculture startups to apply for funding.

Currently, the brand is hosting it’s fourth incubator class, since it launched the program in 2016, with companies developing products like tea, hummus and allergen-free baking ingredients. Alongside the food startups, two tech companies will be participating in Chobani’s inaugural Tech Residency Program—CinderBio and Skyven Technologies.

Watch the video above to learn more and stay tuned to other Industry Pulse episodes to keep up with all the innovation happening around your business! To learn about other consumer trends involving sustainability like plant-based meals, watch the video below:

How a Strong Operator-Supplier Partnership Leads to Success

There's more to restaurant success than the perfect operation, service staff, chefs, or menu items. It all begins with the right ingredients, which is exactly where suppliers come in. How does having a strong operator-to-supplier relationship lead to success? Find out in this episode of "Rock My Restaurant," hosted by William Bender and Eric Norman.

And the two special guests joining them? The first is Katy A. Jones, who serves as vice president of marketing at FoodLogiQ, a supply chain management software company whose products aim to improve food safety, traceability, and sustainability. Jamie Davis, the director of supply chain of 400-unit brand Tropical Smoothie Cafe, also shares her insights on how to improve communications between restaurants and food sources.

What kinds of questions should operators expect to answer while evaluating their supply chain?

"What it comes down to is how do you balance between...food safety, your food costs...to what consumers are asking for?" Davis said. "How do you engage your suppliers to meet that need?"

Jones also brings up another concern operators should be aware of as they're moving from being a one-to-two-unit chain to a 15-to-30-unit chain.

"Do you have suppliers that can really grow with you?" She said.

A common challenge for a brand and its supply chain is staying true to its vision, Jones said. A chain can start with a strong brand promise, such as being a farm-to-fork establishment. When a chain expands nationwide, how can operators stitch their supply chain to stay true to their foundational values? 

Do as much research as possible, Davis encouraged. Take a look at suppliers' history, their processes, and their own goals and missions statements. You can never over communicate.

"Years ago, 10 years ago, 15 years ago, [with suppliers] you either take it or leave it. But these days, it's more of you build a relationship. You build a solid relationship with your supplier, with your customers, so you can succeed," Davis said.

Watch the full episode now to learn more!