Resy is Using Machine Learning to Help Restaurants Turn Tables More Efficiently

Resy is Using Machine Learning to Help Restaurants Turn Tables More Efficiently

On this episode of On Foodable: Industry Pulse, we talk to Stephanie Cohen, head of sales for Resy, as she explains how the CRM platform helps restaurants better run their front of house operations.

The company launched in New York City in 2014 and is co-founded by innovators and entrepreneurs Ben Leventhal, Michael Montero, and Gary Vaynerchuk. Resy features complete restaurant reservations and waitlist system, table management, ticketing, web and app booking, CRM, and POS.

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Incorporate These Seating Strategies to Improve Your Restaurant Revenue Management

There are many tactical elements to operating a restaurant business and Restaurant Revenue Management (RRM) is one of them.

RRM can be defined simply as selling the right seat, to the right customer, at the right price, and for the right duration of time.

As property and overall restaurant operating costs continue to increase, so does the desire to maximize seating and guest turnover. This goes for either a full service or quick service restaurant environment. There is, however, a science to restaurant seating strategies— the essence of RRM.

First and foremost, restaurateurs need to understand their intended guest experience and their ideal customer profile — including guest behaviours — to maximize their seating potential.  

private seating fine dining

With the right seating strategy, a restaurateur will position themselves to increase guest spending, increase turned tables, and contribute to a more positive guest experience. Consequently, this will greatly affect the operator’s revenue and profit potential.

An award winning seating strategy will include the following planning steps and thought processes.

Here are six factors to think about:

1. Room Size

The general rule of thumb for a restaurant is to allocate 60 to 70 percent of real estate to the dining area with the remaining percentage allocated for kitchen, storage, and washrooms etc. Ideally, a restaurant wants to keep approximately 20 to 25 square feet per seat, to offer the most comfort and flexibility for guests and the most adequate flow for staff including traffic aisles, server stations, and beverage bars/counters.

For example, a 5,000 square foot property will provide approximately 3,250 square feet (65 percent) for the dining and/or service area, resulting in an average of 144 optimal seats (22.5 square feet per seat).

2. Table Size

As with the above room size, there is a general rule of thumb for table size as well. Ideally, guests should be given a minimum of 300 square inches of space (per guest). For example, a 24 inch by 30 inch table will offer 720 total square inches of space or 360 total square inches per guest for up to two guests, often enough space for traditional plating, utensils, and glassware.

table guest space

Table size can fluctuate based on concept, menu, plating style, and service sequence. Make the tables too small, and guests will feel uncomfortable and leave more quickly. Make the tables too large, and your property will lose valuable real estate. In this case, size does matter!

3. Table Optimization

A profitable interior design combines a variety of table sizes to meet the demand of different sized parties in addition to maximizing Sales Per Minute (SPM), an essential key performance indicator of Restaurant Revenue Management. For a restaurant to be successful, it needs to live in the moment by maximizing every day, every hour, and every seat.

Optimizing table sizes and their positioning, will improve traffic flow and turnover while reducing noise and accidents within the restaurant. Utilize point-of-sale reports to understand typical party sizes, average duration of stay, and dollars spent to ensure the restaurant is not wasting any seats or opportunities.

4. Guest Positioning

Depending on the concept, we know guests either sit themselves or wait to be seated. If one were to sit back and watch how guests were to seat themselves in a full service restaurant, a high percentage of guests would rather choose to sit near a window, featured wall (near fireplaces or wine racks, for example), or a partition wall. This is because these elements create a level of comfort.

modern seating arrangement

When planning a floor layout, it is important to keep this in mind and create multiple “levels of comfort” that guests will connect with and want to be seated near, allowing the restaurant to maximize the space and not have undesirable seating areas that lead to quick visits and less spending.

5. Seating Styles

Without getting into specific details on chair styles (that’s another article), there are three key seating arrangements that are known to either keep guests in their seats and/or keep them spending more money.

Banquette tables (a bench along a wall with an opposite chair), often reduces sales per minute because it keeps guests sitting longer (which can be a great thing). This results, however, in a requirement for the restaurant to up-sell coffees, desserts, and/or other profitable items throughout the meal. This is a critical communication point to all service staff.

booth seating

Booths on the other hand, are the number one option for guests and users of these booths are known to spend more in both time and dollars, as they feel highly comfortable and often feel a higher sense of privacy. Unfortunately, most restaurants cannot offer a space consisting 100 percent of booths, nor is it ideal for single diners. The right table and seating mix is required, but more booths than others, is a more desirable approach.

Traditional tables, those with two or more seats, often lead to quicker visits, unless strategically positioned near levels of comfort and appropriately spaced apart — offering a more intimate experience and ultimately leading to longer stays. It is essential this setting is truly mixed for seating of two and four (or more) to maximize potential and to reduce the risk of a single diner, for example, sitting at a table for four.

6. Guest Duration

By now, we understand that the longer a guest stays, the more they need to spend to maximize the seat and space. As a restaurateur who knows their concept and ideal customer profile, one must decide whether to focus on longer stays and higher revenues per table or to focus on volume of guests (resulting in volume food and beverage production). What is needed to not only breakeven, but be profitable long term while having a highly productive, but not overrun kitchen and bar?

Every concept and every location will be slightly different, but once you know the average meal length, one can determine many other aspects of the restaurant such as full potential for each day of the week which will then correlate to improving other financial management components including optimal staff schedules and food and beverage preparation.  

Restaurant Curb Appeal– How to Start your Guest’s Dining Experience Off on the Right Foot

Restaurant Curb Appeal– How to Start your Guest’s Dining Experience Off on the Right Foot

Outside of social media, word-of-mouth, and online directories– how else does a potential guest notice a restaurant? A store’s outside appearance. Here are some tips to considering before opening a restaurant  to enhance your store's curb appeal. 

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Property Line to the Consumer

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Watch this episode and more!

All six episodes are available to Foodable+ members. Membership is an all-in-one package of the game-changing trends, expert analysis, reports and insights driving the industry for the entire year!

This season on "Rock My Restaurant" Foodable Network is bringing you a premium content package of nine in-depth episodes that can be paired with our Rock My Restaurant PRO Workbooks, expert guides, and reports– all available for purchase.

Each episode, co-hosted by veteran foodservice industry consultants Bill Bender and Eric Norman, will help take your operation to the top. That's right — you’ll get access to two highly-acclaimed foodservice consultants, all from the viewing pleasure of your own home, office, or classroom.

“Rock My Restaurant” is the show that helps industry professionals build their restaurant from the ground up.

Episode 3: Property Line to the Consumer

Appearance, accessibility and design are critical to a restaurant’s success. Choosing, designing and maintaining your property can mean the difference between attracting and repelling customers.

On this episode of Rock My Restaurant, Hosts Bill Bender and Eric Norman analyze what you should be doing to ensure your restaurant is catering to your guests and providing them with an enjoyably memorable experience. In order to provide that experience, Eric shares some advice given to him by his FCSI colleague and father, Ed Norman.

“You have to walk in the guest’s shoes and plan everything a guest and team member will experience in the entire facility.”

Some things to consider while planning:

  • Restaurant Visibility - Can you see your restaurant from at least 400 feet away?
  • Is there ample parking? Is it well lit? Do you have a guest drop off area?
  • How accessible is your restaurant? Do you meet all ADA and building codes in your local jurisdiction?
  • Landscaping is brandscaping - Landscaping should be a dedicated aspect of your design plan.
  • Signage - Be sure to represent your brand and attract customers while still obeying all signage laws.

Watch the full episode for more tips on what to consider when planning your restaurant design for your guests!

Want to purchase the Rock My Restaurant PRO Workbooks and follow along with each episode for a richer experience? You'll get the following assets:

  • The Proactive Management Guide
  • Top 8 Digital Musts for Your Restaurant
  • Ergonomic Impacts on Design
  • Millennial Report
  • Operating Systems Audit
  • and more!

More than the Menu and Service: How Smaller Details Make for Bigger and Better Guest Experience

More than the Menu and Service: How Smaller Details Make for Bigger and Better Guest Experience

By Brian Murphy, Foodable Industry Expert

Guests choose to spend their money at your establishment for a variety of reasons, and while that can be exclusively for the food or the beverages, the overall experience is what leaves a lasting impression. Your guests interact with more than your staff and what’s on the menu — the things they see and touch are more powerful than you think, and can direct the guest experience in a positive or negative way.

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