Nicole Marquis, Founder and CEO of HipCityVeg is an Entrepreneur on a Mission

Nicole Marquis, Founder and CEO of HipCityVeg is an Entrepreneur on a Mission
  • Philadelphia’s HipCityVeg is on a Mission to Show that Plant-Based Food can be Delicious!

On this episode, Nicole Marquis, Founder and CEO of HipCityVeg, tells us how she developed her restaurant to show people that plant-based cuisine can be delicious. Her mission started when her desire to help her father fix his high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes became a debate about genetics versus diet.  Nicole knew that she needed to show, not tell, her father that he could eat well and not give anything up that he loves about food, to instill a lifestyle change.

Listen to the podcast above to hear how Marquis is using the restaurant industry to facilitate lifestyle changes for her customers. 

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Is the Juicing Trend Here to Stay? How Concepts are Profiting from Raw Juice Programs

Is the Juicing Trend Here to Stay? How Concepts are Profiting from Raw Juice Programs

By Kerri Adams, Editor-at-Large

The healthy eating movement has influenced an array of trends and fads in the last five years. Some of these include the paleo diet, GMO-free foods, gluten-free foods, organic foods and most recently cold-pressed juice.

Although the concept of “raw juice” is newer, juicing has been around since the 1970s. But starting in 2009, cold-pressed, raw juices became wildly popular and food bloggers soon were posting artistic photos of these beverages, while boosting how they were full of nutrients.

Not to be confused with the grocery staples like orange juice or cranberry juice, these types of fruit juices are often just as unhealthy as a sugary drink. So cold-pressed juices have emerged as the healthy, yet easy way to get your daily dose of veggies and fruits.

Celebrities like Beyoncé and Jennifer Aniston soon started to indorse juice-only diets.

Today the cold-pressed juice sector is worth $100 million, according to the market research firm IBISWorld.

But, cold-pressed, raw juices are different than those made at home with your juicer. After the ingredients are mixed, it’s bottled, sealed and thrown into a large chamber where a tremendous amount of water applies pressure. This makes the shelf life of the juice longer.

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Healthy New L.A. Fast Casual: Kye's Handheld Paleo-Friendly Wraps

Healthy New L.A. Fast Casual: Kye's Handheld Paleo-Friendly Wraps

BKrystal Hauserman, Foodable Contributor

The Paleo diet (short for “Paleolithic”), popularized by Dr. Loren Cordain, has become increasingly popular in the United States in the last several years. In a nutshell (pun intended), the philosophy is that we should be eating the way our Stone Age hunter-gatherer ancestors ate.  

Now before you roll your eyes at the thought of another fad diet, know that there is some very serious scientific evidence and hundreds of thousands of years of human evolution to support the idea that the majority of our diet should be focused on fresh vegetables and fruit, lean meats and fish, and nuts. Out with the starches, dairy, grains, and highly processed, sugar-laden foods found in the center aisles of the grocery store (yes, even the health food stores!).  

Though some people have the mistaken impression that “going Paleo” means breakfast plates filled with nothing but bacon, eggs and butter, the reality is that it should look more like a frittata chock full of farmers market veggies and topped with fresh herbs. The exciting part of the Paleo way of eating is that it encourages you to try new foods (kohlrabi, anyone?), and to get creative in the kitchen. The Paleo principals are as flexible as you want them to be. So yes, you can still enjoy your sushi with rice and soy sauce on occasion.

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