Burn, Burning, Burnt: How to Avoid Losing Kitchen Staff in This Industry

Burn, Burning, Burnt: How to Avoid Losing Kitchen Staff in This Industry

You want a sharp staff, but they are worn dull and nowhere near as effective as when their utility shirts still had the Dickies tags on them. Kitchen staff work hard, under extreme conditions and pressure, and keep production rolling. Not to mention, they are leaving this industry in waves as burnt-out shells of their former selves.

We want them to run specials, for instance, but operators aren’t engaging the process to give them breathing room. Creativity suffers, tempers wear phyllo-thin, and then there is the inevitable exit, at a rate around ¾ of your staff per year.

How can the holes in your foodservice business be plugged to ensure that it doesn’t keep happening?

The Trifecta of Failure

Overworked, underpaid, and undervalued are repetitive themes when talking with staff members, across segments, and across the country.

Over 60-hour work weeks are not infrequent, as much as they are the norm. Pay is supposed to be on a merit, right? Isn’t that how a craft trade works? And the people working hands-on in a hot kitchen are dealt body blows when it comes to being praiseworthy.

The trifecta of failure has been woven into the fabric of chefs’ aprons at an incredible cost and as an anchor that drags down loyalty.

Read More