Burger King is the Latest QSR to Serve the Plant-Based Impossible Burger

The plant-based company Impossible Foods has partnered with yet another massive quick-serve chain.

On Monday, Impossible Foods announced that the Impossible Whopper will now be available at 59 Burger King stores in the surrounding area of St. Louis, Missouri.

Since the announcement was made on April Fools, the "burger giant released a hidden-camera-style promo video showing the serving of plant-based Whoppers instead of meat to customers who marvel that they cannot tell the difference," writes "Reuters."

Burger King decided to partner with the plant-based company because the Impossible Burger not only mimics the looks of a traditional beef burger but it is similar in taste.

“We’ve done sort of a blind taste test with our franchisees, with people in the office, with my partners on the executive team, and virtually nobody can tell the difference," said Christopher Finazzo, Burger King’s North America president.

The Impossible Whopper is priced about $1 more than the traditional Whopper.

As we said, Burger King isn't the only fast food burger chain jumping on the plant-based bandwagon by partnering with Impossible Foods.

In April of last year, White Castle started serving the Impossible Slider. After the success of the menu item at 140 test stores, the chain announced that the Impossible Slider would be available nationwide.

Burger King is the first big chain to serve the Impossible Burger with the company’s new recipe. Earlier in the year, Impossible Foods change the recipe so that it is gluten-free. The company decided to switch out the wheat protein for a soy protein concentrate. The new patty also has no animal hormones or antibiotics either, along with less salt.

Learn more about the Impossible Whopper at "Reuters" now.

Veggie-burger companies have been battling it out to capture more of the market share. Impossible Foods' rival Beyond Meat has been more focused on retail, but in January Beyond Meat announced that it would be rolling out its plant-based Beyond Burger at the QSR Carl’s Jr.

Beyond Meat, which recently went public, has more of an expansive product line, which includes "chicken" strips, "beef" crumble, and "sausage"– all made out of plants, non-GMO soy, and pea protein.

We recently sat down with Ethan Brown, the CEO of Beyond Meat to discuss why plant-based foods have become so popular. Listen to the episode of The Barron Report below to see what Brown thinks the future holds for the plant-based market and to learn more about Beyond Meat's role in the movement.

Impossible Foods to Roll Out Plant-Based Steak

Impossible Foods, one of the leading companies in the plant-based market, isn't only going to sell its popular veggie-burger. Instead, the company is also working on developing a plant-based steak product, according to a recent interview with Impossible Foods' CEO Patrick Brown.

Brown said that a veggie steak that even meateaters love could be "the most impactful thing" the company does.

"[Steak] has huge symbolic value,” said Brown to "The Spoon." "If we can make an awesomely delicious world-class steak ... that will be very disruptive not just to the beef industry, but to other sectors of the meat industry."

However, developing a steak formula isn't easy. A steak marbling and texture is difficult to replicate without using any animal products at all.

Just last week, Impossible Foods announced that its Impossible Burger will have a new recipe that is gluten-free after the company decided to switch out the wheat protein for a soy protein concentrate. The new patty also has no animal hormones or antibiotics either, along with less salt. The new burger patty also has the consistency to be used as ground meat now, meaning it has multiple applications besides just being a veggie burger.

While Impossible Foods is experimenting with new products, it's Impossible Burger has become one of the most popular veggie burgers out there. It's vegan, yet it bleeds like a real burger. The company has focused on the restaurant market and White Castle now serves the Impossible Slider for $1.99.

The company's mission to offer an alternative to meat products, as it says on its website "using animals to make meat is a prehistoric and destructive technology."

Read more about Impossible Foods’ mission to launch a steak product at “Food Dive” now.

But the higher cost of plant-based burgers could be detouring consumers, especially meat eaters from selecting them as their protein option.

Impossible Foods' rival Beyond Burger has focused on retail and sells its plant-based burger for $5.99 for two patties at grocery stores. This is more than half the price for real beef burgers.

But Beyond Meat, which recently went public, has more of an expansive product line, which includes "chicken" strips, "beef" crumble, and "sausage"– all made out of plants, non-GMO soy, and pea protein.

We recently sat down with Ethan Brown, the CEO of Beyond Meat to discuss why plant-based foods have become so popular. Listen to the episode of The Barron Report below where Host Paul Barron talks to Brown about the future of the plant-based market and Beyond Meat's role in the movement.

White Castle Expands the Impossible Slider to All Store Menus

Back in April, the fast food chain White Castle added the Impossible Slider, a plant-based mini burger to the menus of 140 of its chains in New York, New Jersey, and Chicago area.

In partnership with Impossible Foods, the chain has announced that it will be expanding the menu item nationwide.

The Impossible Burger has become wildly popular among vegetarians and flexitarians. The veggie burger that looks so much like the traditional beef burger that it even bleeds.

The ingredient soy leghemoglobin, which causes the burger to "bleed," is made from soybean plants. The ingredient got regulatory pushback from the Food and Drug Administration (F.D.A.) last August but was officially approved two months ago.

Impossible Foods, which has garnered over $250 million in investment, aims to bring veggie burgers to the fast food lovin' masses.

“White Castle’s model has been often imitated but never duplicated -- an impressive feat in the hypercompetitive fast-food sector,” said Patrick O. Brown, Impossible Foods’ Founder in the press release from April announcing the companies' partnership. “We look forward to working closely with White Castle, and together learning how to popularize plant-based meat with mainstream burger lovers.”

Evidently' White Castle's Impossible Slider test was well-received.

"Our Cravers definitely developed a hunger for the Impossible Slider," said Lisa Ingram, White Castle's CEO. "Sales easily exceeded our expectations."

The slider is topped with cheddar cheese, pickles, onion, and the White Castle signature 2-inch-squared bun.

But the Impossible Burger isn't the only veggie burger that "bleeds." Impossible Food's biggest rival, Beyond Meat also has a burger that bleeds, but this is merely just beet juice. Beyond Meat was the first plant-based burger to be sold in the meat section of grocery stores.

The good news is that there appears to be room for both of these plant-based companies. Plant-based consumption is up over 300 percent over the last year.

Learn all about the plant-based movement in the video below.

Read more about White Castle rolling out the Impossible Slider nationwide at "CNBC" now.

White Castle Adds the Plant-Based Impossible Slider to its Menu

White Castle Adds the Plant-Based Impossible Slider to its Menu

Move over McDonald’s, White Castle is also adding a plant-based burger to its menu.

The fast food chain has partnered with Impossible Foods to introduce a new mini slider with a veggie patty.

Coined the White Castle Impossible Slider, it will be sold at 140 of the burger chains in New Jersey, New York, and the Chicago area for now, but depending on the sales, the chain may expand the menu item nationwide.

The slider will be topped with cheddar cheese, pickles, onion, and the White Castle signature 2-inch-squared bun.

"Plant-based proteins are growing. We felt it was a good opportunity to test it with our customers," said Lisa Ingram, White Castle’s CEO. "We think it will appeal to a broad range of customers — those that are meat eaters who want to try something different and non-meat eaters who want this."

The Impossible Slider will cost a little over double the traditional mini slider, which is about 94 cents.

This isn’t the first veggie slider that White Castle has served, but the Impossible Slider is bigger.

When it comes to veggie burgers the Impossible Burger looks so much like the traditional beef burger that it even bleeds. This plant-based burger is now on the menus at over 300 restaurants and with the White Castle announcement, the veggie patty will be available at hundreds of more.

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