Global Wine Prices May Increase Due to Extreme Weather Occurrences

Global Wine Prices May Increase Due to Extreme Weather Occurrences

minds when it comes to ensuring quality and quantity of their grapes come harvest time. Extreme weather events always take a toll on a vineyard if exposed for too long to extreme temperatures— high or low.

This year’s weather occurrences around the world have been especially rough to the top wine regions causing grapes to either dehydrate, shrivel, become tainted with smoke, ripe ahead of schedule or decrease in quality, not to mention shrink the quantity of grapes worth harvesting.

“In Napa and Sonoma, the excessive heat didn’t affect grapes for sparkling wines or whites harvested earlier in August. But cabernet is in the crosshairs,” reported “Bloomberg.”

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Table 42: Best of 2016

This year, Table 42 brought us innovative dishes, awe-inspiring plating, and truly authentic cuisines from a lineup of first-rate chefs. However, a select few stood out from the rest. Here are Foodable's "Best of" moments for Table 42 in 2016.

Chef Joe Cicala at Le Virtù

The inspiration for Le Virtù comes from Chef Cicala’s experiences all over Abruzzo, Italy. Every dish is inspired by Abruzzese culinary tradition. Take for example, their housemade couscous.

“How we make it is traditional to how they make it in Casalbordino. [We] use a small thistle broom. We dip the broom in water, and then we shake it over the semolina and it creates these little drops, and those little drops become the couscous,” Chef Cicala explained.

After spending a significant amount of time in Abruzzo, Italy, Chef Cicala developed an intimate knowledge of Abruzzo's "primary materials" and applies that experience to his selection of producers and purveyors surrounding Philadelphia like naturally raised pork from Berks County; lamb, chicken and rabbit from Lancaster County; and produce from rural New Jersey and Pennsylvania. What he can’t find locally, Chef Cicala imports from Abruzzo artisanal honey and cheeses, extra virgin olive oil, and even the flour used to make fresh pasta.

Chef Eileen Andrade at Finka Table and Tap

Chef Eileen Andrade’s work ethic and culinary background were instilled by her family early on. Her grandfather opened the well-known Islas Carnitas on Coral Way in Miami years back. 

Andrade learned how to cook authentic Korean dishes after training under a retired woman in Korea. After training every day at 7 a.m. for a few weeks, Andrade fell in love with the culture and cuisine even more. According to Andrade, the fusion of Korean and Latin cuisine that she dishes up at Finka was a no-brainer.

“It’s bold flavors, it’s colorful, it’s saucy... Once I started to pair things, I was just like, ‘Okay, perfect — kimchi goes amazing with rice and beans,'” she said.

Chef Tetsu Yahagi at Spago

Tetsu Yahagi wasn't sure what he wanted to do until he walked into a bookstore one day on a family vacation and stumbled upon Wolfgang Puck’s “Adventures in the Kitchen.”

“My dream, before I left the United States to go back to Japan, was to dine at one of Wolfgang Puck’s restaurants,” he said. “So, I asked my father if we could all dine at Spago. He made a reservation, and that’s where I first met Wolfgang. He signed the book that I bought.”

Now, Yahagi is the chef de cuisine at that very restaurant, working under Chef Lee Hefter.

“We have always created something new, and we still are trying to come up with new ideas, new techniques, new dishes,” Yahagi said. “We don’t want to turn ourselves into a museum. This restaurant needs to be evolving every day, and it needs to be kept always relevant in the industry.”

Keep an eye out for all of this year's "Best of" episodes to learn more about which industry professionals changed the game in 2016!

"Top Dish" Round Two: Vancouver's Cinara

"Top Dish" Round Two: Vancouver's Cinara

Which restaurant reigns supreme? Find out in "Top Dish," a multi-part mini-series where the top three Canadian restaurants go head-to-head for the title of best dish. Restaurants and their chefs, one in Montreal, one in Vancouver, and one in Toronto, will fire up their pans and show off why their talent, style, and concept make them No. 1.

How It's Scored

The scoring system for "Top Dish" begins by determining the top restaurant in each city through our proprietary Foodable Labs data, but to shake things up, we've enlisted the top local food influencers to put their taste buds to the test as critics. Each critic's responsibility is to taste the chef's featured dish (sign us up!) and give a serving of the truth — what is their honest, on-camera critique? (Not in front of the chefs, of course. Unless they're watching this now...)

Our critics are asked to privately rate different elements of the dish and experience to determine an overall score. The overall scores for each restaurant are revealed at the end of "Top Dish." But what goes behind each of the scores? Three things: the critic's scorecard (which includes selection, tableware, plating, ingredients, and more on a scale of 1 to 10), food sentiment score, and service sentiment score, the latter two tracked by Foodable Labs. In total, the highest score a restaurant can earn is 270 points.

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Cook with a Local: Four Destinations For Culinary Inspiration

Cook with a Local: Four Destinations For Culinary Inspiration

By Krystal Hauserman, Foodable Contributor

Travel is a surefire way to reignite your passion for food, discover new ingredients and techniques, and find inspiration for new products, menu items and concepts.  Connecting with a local chef and spending a few hours with them perusing a local market -- and if you are lucky, cooking with them in their home or restaurant -- is a great way to dive in to the culture and cuisine of a new place. Below are four local cooks that will inspire you with the classic flavors of lemon and herbs in Tuscany and Provence, fiery chiles in Mexico, and exotic galangal in Indonesia.     

Mexico City, Mexico

Beto and Jorge, Casa Jacaranda

The stunning home of Beto and Jorge in the quaint Colonia Roma neighborhood of Mexico City is ground zero for inspired, “back-to-basics” Mexican cuisine.  Although Beto and Jorge are quick to reject being labeled “chefs,” they are undeniably extremely talented cooks. After an enlivening tour of  Mercado Medellin, with stops to sample specialties like Oaxaca cheese, dried chiles and smoked habanero salsa, Beto and Jorge will guide you on a short walk to their lovingly restored early 19th Century home, Casa Jacaranda (named for the towering Jacaranda tree that delights with beautiful purple blooms in the spring).

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