This Cookbook Aims to Capture a Snapshot of American Food

This Cookbook Aims to Capture a Snapshot of American Food

The United States has a truly diverse food scene.

Not only are we lucky enough to be in a country that has fostered a creative epicenter with resources that help both chefs and amateur cooks specialize in different culinary areas (from seafood and barbecue, to forging and plant-based cooking), but we are also known as a nation of immigrants, full of people with different backgrounds, traditions, and palettes.

Joe Yonan, the two-time James Beard Award-winning Food & Dining editor of “The Washington Post,” set out to capture a snapshot of America and what better way to do this, than through food?

In Yonan’s introduction to the book, he states: “...when we ask the question, ‘What is American food?’ we might as well be asking, ‘What is America?’ Because the answer is every bit as complex...”

Well, the outcome was America The Great Cookbook.

The West Texas-native decided to ask America’s best chefs a personal question: What do you cook for the people you love?

The cookbook, which will go on sale the last day of October, will feature recipes and stories from over 100 food personalities, producers and home cooks representing all 50 states.

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Brunch Goes Vegan in D.C.

Brunch Goes Vegan in D.C.

To many, the words “vegan” and “brunch” do not belong in the same sentence. Brunch evokes images of comfort food: stacks of rich, buttery pancakes; cheesy, fluffy omelets; and of course, bacon. By definition, vegan is devoid of animal products – so say goodbye to butter, eggs, cheese, and, without a doubt, bacon. A vegan meal, however, doesn’t have to be lacking in flavor, and a recent vegan brunch at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., proved exactly that.

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