Foodable Network Sits Down with Chef Ted Hopson of LA's The Bellwether

Chef Ted Hopson  | JetSet Times

Chef Ted Hopson | JetSet Times

Chef Ted Hopson, of the newly opened The Bellwether in Studio City, began his culinary training at Le Cordon Bleu in Pasadena, but his foray into kitchens began much earlier than that. Growing up in an Italian family, Hopson recalls how food was apart of his upbringing and as such, has always been ingrained into his everyday life.

Hopson's newest concept, The Bellwether, recently opened in Studio City with the goal of showcasing the abundance of California produce as well as highlight the local farmers and purveyors who provide the restaurant with their fresh ingredients. The chef's market-inspired menu has already won over local residents as well as made headlines, including being dubbed one of Los Angeles Magazine's Top 10 Best New Restaurants of 2015.    

Read on as we ask the chef six quick questions here.

Sausal Restaurant Offers Diners a Taste of the Past

Sausal Restaurant Offers Diners a Taste of the Past

By Courtney Walsh, West Coast Editor

Chefs find their culinary inspiration from a number of places; some look to family traditions, others to cultural heritage. For Chef Anne Conness of the newly opened Sausal, she finds her inspiration in the past.

Looking back at the rich history of the California rancheros, Conness opened Sausal in El Segundo this summer with the intention of highlighting both the local produce and meats that were once grown throughout the region as well as the dishes enjoyed by the rancheros that once lived on the Rancho Sausal Redondo, the ranch that made up the very area where the restaurant is now located.

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The Heralded Return of Clifton's Cafeteria, Los Angeles' Oldest Cafeteria

The Heralded Return of Clifton's Cafeteria, Los Angeles' Oldest Cafeteria

By Allison Levine, Foodable Contributor

In the 1920s and 1930s, the Broadway Theater District in Downtown Los Angeles was filled with theaters, movie palaces and retail stores. The former Los Angeles Yellow Car ran along Broadway bringing people to and fro. Broadway was the commercial capital of the nation. And in the heart of Broadway, and among the bustling crowds on the street, Clifton’s Cafeteria opened.

 The Original Clifton’s Cafeteria

The first Clifton’s Cafeteria opened in 1931, amidst the Great Depression. Founded by Clifford Clinton, the name Clifton’s was created by combining his name. The location on Broadway, which opened in 1935 and was initially called “Clifton’s Brookdale,” was the second Clifton’s facility. While once part of a chain of eight Clifton’s restaurants, Clifton’s Cafeteria at 648 S. Broadway is noted as the oldest cafeteria in Los Angeles and the largest public cafeteria in the world. With over 600 seats on three floors, the space is 50,000 square feet.

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Maude Transitions Over To Online Reservation System

Maude Transitions Over To Online Reservation System

By Allison Levine, Foodable Contributor

In 2014, Chef Curtis Stone opened Maude, his first restaurant in Los Angeles. Maude is an intimate 25-seat restaurant in Beverly Hills and features one seasonal ingredient each month that is built into each of the nine courses of the tasting menu. With only two seatings per night for a total of 50 diners, a table at Maude is highly sought after each month. 

Chef Stone had made a name for himself on television with the show Take Home Chef and as the host of Top Chef Masters. However, this celebrity chef trained and worked with some of the best chefs in the world, including Chef Marco Pierre White in London. From the beginning, there was anticipation and demand to dine at Maude. Chef Stone’s high profile and large social media following, matching the limited seating in the restaurant, resulted in filling every reservation immediately.

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Chef Ricardo Zarate Returns to the LA Culinary Scene With Once Pop-Up

Chef Ricardo Zarate Returns to the LA Culinary Scene With Once Pop-Up

By Allison Levine, Foodable Contributor

Chef Ricardo Zarate first made a name for himself in Los Angeles when he opened Mo-Chica inside Mercado La Paloma in Downtown Los Angeles in 2009. Known for his inventive interpretation on Peruvian cuisine, his star quickly rose as he opened Picca, a second Mo-Chica and Paiche. Zarate was named one of Food & Wine magazine’s best new chefs in 2011 and Picca was also named one of GQ magazine’s best new restaurants that year.

Last year, rumors started swirling as Zarate left all of his restaurants in October 2014. Regardless of what happened, he and his food were missed. But, now he is back!

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