What’s The Key Role of Leadership?

What’s The Key Role of Leadership?

As 2017 is nearing its end, the answer is one that’s both consistent and evolving.  Just in case you missed Parts One and Two of this leadership series, here’s a short recap:  The question was asked, “What are the three top responsibilities of leadership, that is, an owner, or C-suite leader?”   

I answered my own question in Part One wearing two hats: experienced owner, and multi-decade “vet” who’s facilitated change and growth in over 1,600 restaurant and hospitality companies in different industry segments.  

Part Two of the series expanded the dialogue. Readers got the perspective of a Founder/CEO, SVP of a multinational brand, and COO of a regional chain.  The panel represented three different industry segments and sizes— all highly successful.

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4 Myths About Restaurant Leadership Debunked

4 Myths About Restaurant Leadership Debunked

You made it to the top! You are a leader in your restaurant. Before you get too comfortable, let’s see if your leadership game is on point. Being called a leader and being a leader are at times not one and the same. With more and more restaurants opening each year the strain on the labor pool is becoming an epidemic. We struggle to fill leadership positions. Maybe the reason is because we don’t have a clear understanding of what true leadership is?

Undeclared expectations and undefined roles are usually at the forefront of this dilemma. We need to do a better job talking about what true leadership is. There are a lot of urban myths out there about what people may think is leadership. To understand what leadership is, we first must take a look at what it is not.

Here are four common myths about restaurant leadership:

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Not Getting the Most Out of Your Team? How to Be a Leader and Inspire Their Best

Not Getting the Most Out of Your Team? How to Be a Leader and Inspire Their Best

By Donald Burns, Foodable Industry Expert

We hear it all the time: “Teamwork makes the dream work.” Good saying. Very positive. But often, it’s not true. And the reason is simple.

Some people on your team just don't want to do the work.

So, what is a restaurant owner or leader to do? Let’s dig into some basic human needs psychology and find a few answers that can help you inspire those that work with you.

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Training Mentality: Focus on What You Should ALWAYS Do, Not What You Shouldn’t Do

Training Mentality: Focus on What You Should ALWAYS Do, Not What You Shouldn’t Do

By Andrew Carlson, Foodable Industry Expert

Over the last couple months, I've had the opportunity to open a few restaurants and build a training program from scratch. I’ve also had the opportunity to work with some of the hardest-working individuals in the business.

Some of these people have never had any restaurant experience, while others had an abundance of experience. But when it came to training, they all had something in common — this concept was brand new to all of them, and there was a ton of information getting thrown at them in a short period of time.

The thing we must remember is that people all learn differently. Some are more visual, some are more hands-on, and some even learn best from sitting in a lecture hall. At the end of the day, if they don't know what — as a restaurant— you always do, then your training program has failed.

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Tips on Improving Your Training Program

Tips on Improving Your Training Program

By Brian Murphy, Foodable Contributor

The methods of training new and existing employees vary as much as the vast types of establishments, from the pseudo-interview and immediate hire to the month-long, corporate-style onboarding program. There can be success in all of these styles, though some are a roll of the dice. Quality training is as important from the top to bottom of the org chart and is one part of the business that can’t be overlooked or taken for granted.

Is Training Really That Important?

Yes. Incredibly important. The risks that come along with handing a new hire a copy of an outdated handbook and setting them up to shadow a trusted employee (or one that happens to be scheduled that day in some instances) are too great to continue that practice.

What are the most important parts of the handbook? Are they being discussed with new hires? People need to know why they should follow the policies that were chosen to be put in place, and opportunities to discuss them, or at least assess, that they are understood at a deep level should happen early and often during the onboarding process.

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