How Souvla is Capitalizing on the Delivery Craze in San Francisco

In this episode of On Foodable, we are at the Winter Fancy Food Show in San Francisco, where Paul Barron sits down with Charles Bililies, Founder and CEO of Souvla— Lyft’s most traveled-to restaurant in the United States in 2017.

Souvla is a “fast-fine” Greek-American restaurant that Bililies dreamt up about nine years ago, inspired by casual souvlaki joints found throughout Greece.

“Souvla is very much Greek through and through, but nowhere around there will you see “traditional” or “authentic”. We definitely took a lot of liberties as I created the menu,” said Bililies. “Everything on there is sourced locally or it’s coming in from Greece. It’s sorta this Californian-Greek, if you will.”

Essentially he wanted to modernize the way people looked at gyros or souvlaki sandwiches here in America.

Bililies opened the first location in 2014 after about five years of looking for the perfect real estate location. Shortly after Souvla opened, he started seeing the rise of delivery becoming a “thing” in San Francisco.

Fast forward to today, on average, Souvla can pump out between 150 and 225 delivery orders a day. An impressive number coming from an upscale counter service restaurant.

With delivery in mind, Bililies decided to open its fourth location in the Marina neighborhood with a sidewalk facing pick-up window. They successfully were able to lobby the city to allow them to put in a white zone or a passenger loading zone. Bililies believes this is going to be a huge allure and convenience for customers since by doing this people won’t have trouble finding parking or worrying about double parking, etc.

Check out the episode above to see footage of their new location, learn about the restaurant’s menu offerings, and its magic price point making the concept above fast casual but still under fine dining.

Video Produced by:

Vanessa Rodriguez

Vanessa Rodriguez

Writer & Producer


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GrubHub Drivers Ruled Contractors in Landmark Gig-Economy Case

GrubHub Drivers Ruled Contractors in Landmark Gig-Economy Case

In a landmark ruling Thursday, U.S. Magistrate Judge Jacqueline Scott Corley in San Francisco concluded that a gig-economy driver does not qualify for the protection of employees under California law.

The decision is the first of its kind, setting a standard for arguments regarding “gig-economy” workers.

The gig-economy has gotten much press as of late. With a number of businesses like Grubhub and Uber working off the model of pairing customers with products and services through apps, many workers have found a new form of income allowing high flexibility in exchange for low skill, low wage, episodic jobs.

However, the case against GrubHub, brought on by Raef Lawson, claimed the company violated California labor laws by not reimbursing his expenses, paying him less than minimum wage and failing to pay overtime. His argument was based on the idea that Grubhub exerts a certain level of control over. The company expects drivers to be available to accept assignments during shifts they sign up for and to remain in designated geographical areas.

Lawson worked as a food-delivery driver with the company for less than six months while pursuing a career as an actor and writer.

At a hearing in October, Judge Corley expressed concern that Lawson’s resume filed with the lawsuit may have tainted the trial because the actor lied about completing a three-year program. The specifics of the program weren’t provided. However, Corley said Lawson was “dishonest” and that the resume “is really problematic to me.”

Charlotte Garden, an associate law professor at Seattle University, said to Bloomberg that Corley’s decision is a “doubly big” win for GrubHub since California’s relatively high standard for establishing workers as independent contractors will mean similar arguments in other states will most likely side with this ruling.

You can read more about this case at "Bloomberg."

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How Will Snapchat’s New Context Cards Affect the Restaurant Industry?

How Will Snapchat’s New Context Cards Affect the Restaurant Industry?

Snapchat has proven to be a great social media tool for the restaurant industry. If used properly, the app allows loyal guests to form a closer relationship with their local eatery when it provides a fun behind-the-scenes look into the business’ initiatives and customer’s favorite dishes.

Earlier this week, the photo and video messaging app announced a feature that allows users to learn more about what they see on Snapchat.

The company calls it Context Cards.

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Austin Restaurants Support Ride-Sharing Petition

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A growing number of local Austin restaurants have recently begun hosting ride-sharing petition sign up events as a reaction against new regulations enacted by the Austin City Council. The hope is that with enough signatures (20,000), there will be a re-vote on the issue that will force the city council to return to original regulations.

As one local Austin restaurant owner claims, ride-share companies like Uber and Lyft serve to fill the gap in service left by the lessening number of taxis in the city. "I see it as the most positive thing that's touched my industry in years," said bar owner Bob Woody. 

Woody further explained that there just aren't enough taxi cabs to fill the high-demand caused by restaurants and bars on Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings and that these companies allow for patrons to avoid driving intoxicated. Read More