Find Out What Food & Wellness Trends Whole Foods Expects to Rule in 2019

Find Out What Food & Wellness Trends Whole Foods Expects to Rule in 2019

The healthy eating movement has shown no signs of slowing down. Consumers want more menu transparency and plant-based food options, but also want to get adventurous with flavors.

So what are some of the food trends the grocery giant expects to take off in 2019?

According to Whole Foods' 2019 forecast, pacific rim flavors are on the rise.

"Ingredients like longganisa (a Filipino pork sausage), dried shrimp, cuttlefish and shrimp paste are already on many restaurant menus, spanning from breakfast to dinner, while vibrant tropical fruits such as guava, dragon fruit and passionfruit are making their way into your smoothie bowls and cocktails," writes "Body and Soul."

As the cannabis industry is booming in states with recreational marijuana, hemp products without the psychoactive effects that are legal are popping up at all different retailers.

"Hemp seeds are being heralded as the new chia seeds, as ‘complete proteins’ and are packed full of essential fatty acids," writes "Body and Soul."

The legal cannabis compound CBD, which is known to have multiple healing benefits, is already being added to beverages and foods at restaurants across the country.

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6.4 Million Canadians have Reduced or Eliminated Meat From Their Diets

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The plant-based movement has spread all over the world, especially in Canada.

According to a recent study by the University of Guelph and Dalhousie University, millions of Canadians are consuming less meat, influencing restaurants to offer more plant-based options to accommodate.

Specifically, 82 percent of Canadians still eat meat, but 6.4 million said they have reduced or eliminated meat in their diets. Consumers residing in Ontario, in particular, consume less meat than those in Atlantic Canada.

According to the report, "women are more likely than men to limit or eliminate their meat intake and more likely to replace it with other proteins."

The study also found that the majority (63 percent) of the vegans surveyed were under the age of 38.

Many consumers are choosing to eat plant-based proteins since they are more sustainable.

"By 2050, there will be more than 10 billion people on the planet, and while people will still be eating animal protein, plant-based proteins that are more sustainably produced are a credible alternative."

Restaurants have had to adjust to the consumers' changing diets whether by adding more plant-based meals or giving guests the option to sub a meat protein with a plant-based one.

"We have been making a real effort to be more plant-based, and many restaurants are trying to be a bit more mindful of trends, the environmental impact and food costs. Even in our diets at home, we've found ourselves putting more veggies at the center of the plate," said Nick Benninger, Fat Sparrow restaurateur.

Benninger's restaurant Marbles in Waterloo has embraced the vegan trend completely and offers a vegan prix-fixe menu on Tuesdays. This vegan-themed night has certainly paid off and has become one of the restaurant's most crowded nights.

Read more about the plant-based surge in Canada at “CBC.”

Want more data on the plant-based movement and how it is gaining momentum? Watch the On Foodable Industry Pulse episode below to see how 51 percent of chefs have added vegan items to their menus this year.

52 Percent of Shoppers are Buying More Plant-based Products

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Although a lot of turkeys are being consumed today, more consumers are embracing a plant-based lifestyle.

According to yet another study, 52 percent of U.S. shoppers are eating more plant-based foods and beverages.

Apparently, these consumers don't think this is just a fad diet either.

In the study by DuPont Nutrition & Health, 60 percent of those surveyed plan to keep the switch to plant-based foods permanent because they feel healthier being on this diet.

“There is a seismic shift occurring in eating habits globally, creating a significant market opportunity. Most important, our research reveals that for most consumers, this has moved beyond experimentation into a permanent change brought on by health, lifestyle and social factors,” said Greg Paul, DuPont official in a press release about the study.

Read more about the Dupont study at “bizwomen” now.

This year, there have been multiple studies reporting similar findings.

According to Nielsen, 40 percent of Americans are trying to eat more plant-based foods.

Kimpton's 2019 Culinary & Cocktails Trend Forecast by Kimpton Hotels and Restaurants group said that the plant-based movement is going into overdrive in 2019.

Plant-based sales reached $3.3 billion this year, as reported by Nielsen.

But that's just the beginning. The plant-based industry is expected to be worth $5.2 billion in sales by 2020, according to Oregon-based Allied Market Research (AMR.)

When tracking social data pulled from Foodable Labs, we saw that plant-based consumption is up by 300 percent over the last year. Specifically, 51 percent of chefs have added vegan menu items to their menus this year, which is a 31 percent increase from last year.

Learn more about the plant-based movement and how it is here to stay in the video below.

Beyond Meat Goes Public

A few weeks ago, there were rumors that the plant-based company Beyond Meat was planning to go public before the end of the year.

Well, these rumors ended up being true because last Friday, Beyond Meat filed an initial public offering for $100 million.

Beyond Meat reported $56.4 million in revenue for the first nine months of 2018, which is a 167 percent spike from last year.

"Going forward, we intend to continue to invest in innovation, supply chain capabilities, manufacturing and marketing initiatives," said the company in the filing.

The plant-based market is growing at a rapid rate as more consumers gravitate to a vegetarian or flexitarian lifestyle.

Plant-based consumption is up over 300 percent over the last year, according to our Foodable Labs data.

The Good Food Institute (GFI) has also released market data from Nielsen showing that the sales of this sector have recently exceeded $3.7 billion and that plant-based meat sales specifically have increased by 23 percent.

Beyond Meat was one the first companies to offer a vegan burger and quickly emerged as one of the biggest players in the plant-based protein market.

Besides being the first plant-based burger to be sold in the meat section at Whole Foods, the company has partnered with restaurants and food distributors across the country to get the Beyond Burger on more menus.

Beyond Meat has sold over 25 million veggie burgers that are "the closest thing to meat" ever created, boasts the company.

But the company has developed a product mimicking meat for a reason. Its target demographic aren't vegans and vegetarians, instead, it's flexitarians who may eat meat but choose not to often because of its environmental impact.

"Instead of marketing and merchandising The Beyond Burger to vegans and vegetarians (who represent less than 5% of the U.S. population), we request that the product be sold in the meat case at grocery retailers, where meat-loving consumers are accustomed to shopping for center-of-plate proteins," writes the company in the filing.

The Beyond Burger is now available in 11,000 grocery stores across the country.

Read more about Beyond Meat going public at "CNN."

Don’t miss The Barron Report episode below where Paul Barron goes into more detail about the plant-based company’s move to go public.

Have Amazon Go and UberEats Become a Threat to Restaurant Operators?

Operators have always had to compete in the market with other concepts, but in today's market, there are a new set of power players ready to steal your customers.

Enter Amazon.

Amazon, like the fast casual segment, is catering to the on-the-go consumer with its cashier-less Amazon Go stores, many of which offer grab-and-go food options. These stores have become the most popular during the workweek, especially at lunchtime.

We recently analyzed the aggressive move Amazon is making in the foodservice industry. Listen to this episode of The Barron Report for more insights on if fast casual restaurants can survive this threat.

But there is one advantage that restaurants, namely fast casual restaurants, have over the Amazon Go stores– many have embraced the plant-based movement. According to Foodable Labs data, today's foodies can't get enough of these plant-based menu items.

Don’t miss our video breaking down this data about the plant-based movement below.

Amazon isn't the only threat operators need to be worried about. There is another shark circling to take a bite out of your business.

Third-party delivery services emerged as a solution that many operators desperately needed.

Since offering delivery has quickly become a guests' expectation, an operator has two options. One is to invest in significant funding to build a delivery program. However, this is easier said than done. It entails creating a system, investing in a platform to process these orders, hiring more staff to handle take-out and delivery orders, and then hiring reliable drivers to deliver these orders.

Or an operator can simply partner with a third-party delivery service, which eliminates most of the headaches. When you consider the operational and logistical challenges of offering delivery, its no wonder that operators across the country have decided to go the route of partnering with a third-party delivery service.

But now this has created a new problem.

One of the most popular delivery services out there is now UberEats. This company has quickly conquered the market. UberEats is currently offering food delivery for 50 percent of the U.S. population and has the lofty goal of serving 70 percent of the U.S. population by the end of this year.

As UberEats becomes more popular, the more the fees increase for the participating restaurants. Could this be correlated to the increase in restaurant closings?

Listen to the podcast above as The Barron Report host Paul Barron explains the data showing that third-party delivery growth may be tied to restaurant failures.