Burger King is the Latest QSR to Serve the Plant-Based Impossible Burger

The plant-based company Impossible Foods has partnered with yet another massive quick-serve chain.

On Monday, Impossible Foods announced that the Impossible Whopper will now be available at 59 Burger King stores in the surrounding area of St. Louis, Missouri.

Since the announcement was made on April Fools, the "burger giant released a hidden-camera-style promo video showing the serving of plant-based Whoppers instead of meat to customers who marvel that they cannot tell the difference," writes "Reuters."

Burger King decided to partner with the plant-based company because the Impossible Burger not only mimics the looks of a traditional beef burger but it is similar in taste.

“We’ve done sort of a blind taste test with our franchisees, with people in the office, with my partners on the executive team, and virtually nobody can tell the difference," said Christopher Finazzo, Burger King’s North America president.

The Impossible Whopper is priced about $1 more than the traditional Whopper.

As we said, Burger King isn't the only fast food burger chain jumping on the plant-based bandwagon by partnering with Impossible Foods.

In April of last year, White Castle started serving the Impossible Slider. After the success of the menu item at 140 test stores, the chain announced that the Impossible Slider would be available nationwide.

Burger King is the first big chain to serve the Impossible Burger with the company’s new recipe. Earlier in the year, Impossible Foods change the recipe so that it is gluten-free. The company decided to switch out the wheat protein for a soy protein concentrate. The new patty also has no animal hormones or antibiotics either, along with less salt.

Learn more about the Impossible Whopper at "Reuters" now.

Veggie-burger companies have been battling it out to capture more of the market share. Impossible Foods' rival Beyond Meat has been more focused on retail, but in January Beyond Meat announced that it would be rolling out its plant-based Beyond Burger at the QSR Carl’s Jr.

Beyond Meat, which recently went public, has more of an expansive product line, which includes "chicken" strips, "beef" crumble, and "sausage"– all made out of plants, non-GMO soy, and pea protein.

We recently sat down with Ethan Brown, the CEO of Beyond Meat to discuss why plant-based foods have become so popular. Listen to the episode of The Barron Report below to see what Brown thinks the future holds for the plant-based market and to learn more about Beyond Meat's role in the movement.

Impossible Foods to Roll Out Plant-Based Steak

Impossible Foods, one of the leading companies in the plant-based market, isn't only going to sell its popular veggie-burger. Instead, the company is also working on developing a plant-based steak product, according to a recent interview with Impossible Foods' CEO Patrick Brown.

Brown said that a veggie steak that even meateaters love could be "the most impactful thing" the company does.

"[Steak] has huge symbolic value,” said Brown to "The Spoon." "If we can make an awesomely delicious world-class steak ... that will be very disruptive not just to the beef industry, but to other sectors of the meat industry."

However, developing a steak formula isn't easy. A steak marbling and texture is difficult to replicate without using any animal products at all.

Just last week, Impossible Foods announced that its Impossible Burger will have a new recipe that is gluten-free after the company decided to switch out the wheat protein for a soy protein concentrate. The new patty also has no animal hormones or antibiotics either, along with less salt. The new burger patty also has the consistency to be used as ground meat now, meaning it has multiple applications besides just being a veggie burger.

While Impossible Foods is experimenting with new products, it's Impossible Burger has become one of the most popular veggie burgers out there. It's vegan, yet it bleeds like a real burger. The company has focused on the restaurant market and White Castle now serves the Impossible Slider for $1.99.

The company's mission to offer an alternative to meat products, as it says on its website "using animals to make meat is a prehistoric and destructive technology."

Read more about Impossible Foods’ mission to launch a steak product at “Food Dive” now.

But the higher cost of plant-based burgers could be detouring consumers, especially meat eaters from selecting them as their protein option.

Impossible Foods' rival Beyond Burger has focused on retail and sells its plant-based burger for $5.99 for two patties at grocery stores. This is more than half the price for real beef burgers.

But Beyond Meat, which recently went public, has more of an expansive product line, which includes "chicken" strips, "beef" crumble, and "sausage"– all made out of plants, non-GMO soy, and pea protein.

We recently sat down with Ethan Brown, the CEO of Beyond Meat to discuss why plant-based foods have become so popular. Listen to the episode of The Barron Report below where Host Paul Barron talks to Brown about the future of the plant-based market and Beyond Meat's role in the movement.

The Plant-based Impossible Burger has a New Gluten-Free Recipe

As the battle of the plant-based burgers continues, one of the front runners the Impossible Burger is introducing a new formulation to cater to more eaters with dietary restrictions.

The veggie burger's new recipe is now gluten-free after the company decided to switch out the wheat protein for a soy protein concentrate. The patty also has no animal hormones or antibiotics either, along with less salt.

The Impossible Burger by Impossible Foods is a plant-based burger that debuted in 2016. It looks so much like the traditional beef burger that it even bleeds.

It has been quickly added to the menus of restaurants across the country, including White Castle.

Although the company's previous formulation was a hit with the masses, including non-vegetarians and vegans, the company decided to change the recipe for a few reasons.

"Impossible Burger fans told us loud and clear they wanted a gluten-free burger that was at least as nutritious as meat from animals,” said David Lee, COO and CFO of Impossible Foods in a statement. "Our new product delivers all the taste meat lovers crave — without compromise to nutrition or the planet."

Not only did the company listen to feedback from the customers, but the new recipe makes the product more adaptable and can be substituted for ground meat. The former patty, on the other hand, was intended for mainly flat-top cooking.

The new recipe Impossible Burger will be available for retail later this year.

Read more about Impossible Foods latest change at "Food Dive."

As we said, veggie-burger companies have been battling it out to capture more of the market share. According to recent data from Nielsen, the sales in the plant-based market spiked by 20 percent over the last year.

We recently sat down with a competitor of Impossible Foods to discuss why plant-based foods have become so popular. Listen to the episode of The Barron Report below where Host Paul Barron talks with Ethan Brown, the CEO of Beyond Meat to learn more.

Is Beyond Meat Going to Public?

Beyond Meat is expected to be the first vegan company to go public in the near future, according to a recent report from "CNBC."

It's not surprising considering Beyond Meat has quickly emerged as one of the biggest players in the plant-based protein game.

Besides being the first plant-based burger to be sold in the meat section at Whole Foods, the company has partnered with restaurants and food distributors across the country to get the Beyond Burger on more menus.

So far, the company was sold over 25 million veggie burgers. Earlier this year, Beyond Meat was given the United Nations “Champion of the Earth” award.

Even the meat protein giant Tyson Foods sees potential in the plant-based burger market and made that clear when the company bought a 5 percent stake in Beyond Meat at the end of last year.

The plant-based industry is on the rise and is expected to be worth $5.2 billion in sales by 2020, according to Oregon-based Allied Market Research (AMR.) According to Nielsen, 40 percent of Americans are trying to eat more plant-based foods.

With that being said, Beyond Meat is especially attractive to investors. Bill Gates, Kleiner Perkins, and Kleiner Perkins, and Leonardo DiCaprio are all on the plant-based company's long list of investors.

But will these investors be pleased with an IPO event?

"Many of them are mission investors who might feel that the pressures of being a public company could slow down innovation. At the same time, they should be happy to see the company IPO as it will clear a path for others in this space, like Impossible Foods, to follow suit. Not to mention pocketing a nice return from their original investment in previous rounds," writes "Forbes."

The plant-based company has yet to comment but "CNBC" reported that "JP Morgan, Credit Suisse, and Goldman Sachs are being targeted to lead the deal."

Read more about the speculated deal at "Forbes" now.

We recently sat down with Ethan Brown, CEO of Beyond Burger to discuss the company’s success. Listen to Beyond Meat’s unique story below.

San Diego Foodies are Lining Up at This Fast Food Concept Coined the "Vegan McDonald's"

San Diego Foodies are Lining Up at This Fast Food Concept Coined the "Vegan McDonald's"

It's safe to say that this is just the beginning of the plant-based protein trend. 

As more consumers change their dining habits to consume less meat, the more vegetarian and vegan options like Beyond Burger and Impossible Foods grow in popularity. 

At restaurants, we are seeing more and more vegan-friendly options be highlighted on menus, even in the fast food segment.

Some concepts like Plant Power are ahead of the curve. 

Foodies are willing to wait in long lines to grab a bite to eat from this San Diego-based vegan fast food joint. 

Plant Power saw instant success since opening its second location in Encinitas in 2017. 

“Yeah, we never imagined it would be like that,” said Zach Vouga, the co-founder of Plant Power, to "Thrillist." “I’ve never seen such an intense demand for something. We were slammed hour-in, hour-out, every day once we opened our doors.”

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