Sweetgreen— Success In 4 Key Areas Propel Emerging Brand To The Top

Sweetgreen— Success In 4 Key Areas Propel Emerging Brand To The Top

We talk a lot about guest experiences, core values, sustainability, collaboration, and community within the restaurant industry. One brand that has been excelling at all of the above is Sweetgreen. This emerging brand has over 75 locations operating across much of the United States, employing over 3,500 employees.

Operating since 2007, Sweetgreen has become well known for its simple, seasonal, and healthy food options, by aiming to offer an organic, locally sourced, and inexpensive alternative to the typical QSR. It operates with a transparent food supply network, the company cooks from scratch, and it has built a community of its own; of individuals who have a passion for ‘real food.’

Its systems have had a powerful impact on the health of individuals, communities, and most importantly to them, the environment. The company has positioned itself for further growth and opportunities, by striving for perfection in the following key areas:

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Having Trouble Amplifying Your Brand's Reach? Follow These Tips!

Having Trouble Amplifying Your Brand's Reach? Follow These Tips!

Ask nearly every restaurant owner what their number one, long-term marketing ‘program’ or tactic is, and most will say effective word of mouth. This can be great until it starts to fizzle down or another new restaurant opens up down the street resulting in the competition becoming the new talk of the town.

Instead of shooting into the wind and hoping ‘word of mouth’ with deliver desirable long-term results, restaurateurs need to embrace a program that is an extension of word-of-mouth marketing, by developing what is called ‘brand ambassadors.’

A brand ambassador will positively represent and promote a restaurant’s venue. They will embrace the company values, vision, mission, and culture. They will strengthen a restaurant’s identity within the community by providing additional visibility and overall awareness.

Yes, word of mouth happens organically over time because of excellent food, drink, service, and experiences, don’t get me wrong. But what if there was a way to double-down and create multiple micro-communities and multiple levels of ambassadors to promote a restaurant’s brand?

That’s where an ambassador program comes in.

Here’s how:

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Why Your Restaurant Should Be Involved With the Community

Why Your Restaurant Should Be Involved With the Community

By Andrew Carlson, Foodable Industry Expert

There's a major difference between being a community-driven restaurant and a restaurant that is driven by the community that it resides in.

A community-driven restaurant finds the community benefits and accents them as part of the restaurant. If your restaurant’s community is known for its fresh produce, a community-driven restaurant would create dishes to highlight the community.

But that's only the first step to creating a successful restaurant. The second step of creating a successful restaurant is to be an establishment that your community is proud to have in the area. The stronger the ties to the community, the stronger the connection people will have to your restaurant.

How can you be more involved in your community?

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The Food Waste Challenge: Donate Goods, Deduct Food, and Devote Time

The Food Waste Challenge: Donate Goods, Deduct Food, and Devote Time

By Jaclyn Morgan, FCSI, JM Foodservice Consulting, LLC

Let’s be honest, food waste happens at your restaurant. Some trimmings can be composted, some things recycled, but much more ends up in the trash. Unsightly produce, cans of food on the brink of expiration, and extra prepared dishes add up to money flushed down the toilet. Your last bulk order or a menu change may have you seeing red. Per the Green Restaurant Association, a single restaurant in the U.S. produces between 25,000 and 75,000 pounds of food waste in one year.

Now change your perspective. Last year, over 42 million Americans lived in poverty and in a food insecure household. Nonprofit food banks, food pantries, charitable meal programs, and soup kitchens rely on food donations to provide their communities with hunger relief.

Take another look. Nationwide, a staggering 40 percent of food goes uneaten, and most often than not, ends up in a landfill. The Environmental Protection Agency notes that food waste decomposing in landfills creates methane gas, a greenhouse gas more potent than carbon dioxide.

You don’t have to dump a bucket of ice over your head to be aware that your restaurant can be socially responsibility and sustainable. Food waste can become a charitable donation without liability, and your establishment can reap the rewards of tax deductions and community involvement.

So, take the Food Waste Challenge. Here’s how you can donate goods, deduct food, and devote time.

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