How The Restaurant Industry is Impacted by the Immigration Debate

How The Restaurant Industry is Impacted by the Immigration Debate

To say the immigration topic in the United States is complicated, is an understatement.

Most recently, the national conversation around the subject has been a heated one arising from President Donald Trump’s efforts to shut down the program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, which protects and provides benefits to Dreamers, people who were brought to the United States as undocumented children, under the premise that it was unconstitutional.

According to advocacy group New American Economy, out of this segment of the population, which amounts to 700,000 immigrants who are currently protected under the DACA program, almost 19 percent hold an occupation in the restaurant or food service sector, as reported by “CNBC.”

Based on census data from 2011 through 2015, New American Economy estimated that the top three occupations by DACA-eligible workers include cashiers (6.5 percent), waiters and waitresses (4.9 percent), and chefs and cooks (4.6 percent). The statistics from the report indicate that the hospitality industry would be the hardest hit if the program was to be no more.

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Why Restaurants are Hiring Less

Why Restaurants are Hiring Less

It's a great time to be a foodie, but not so much for an operator. 

In recent years, the restaurant industry has expanded with so many new innovative concepts. 

Several established chains were also hiring to accommodate for growth. Since mid-2009, the industry added 2.3 million jobs. In 2015, consumers spent more at restaurants than at grocery stores. 

It's looks as though for several of these big guys, things are slowing down. In 2016, hiring at restaurants and bars started to move at a much more sluggish pace.

“The best times for restaurant employment have passed,”  said Ryan Sweet, a Moody’s Analytics Inc. economist. He also said it will take some time for the industry to bounce back and that “it’s unlikely restaurants will be able to duplicate the kind of job gains we’ve seen since the expansion began.”

The QSR brands McDonald's and Subway are not opening as many stores this year and have even closed locations. 

As fast food customers are gravitating to other options like prepare foods at grocery markets and meal kit programs and as labor wages increase, chains like Wendy's and McDonald's are turning to automation technology. 

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Chefs Chime In On: Tasting Menus

Chefs Chime In On: Tasting Menus

By Courtney WalshWest Coast Editor

The culinary world is constantly in flux, with new developments and innovations appearing every day. In this series, we offer chefs the opportunity to share their own unique insights into a culinary trend currently making headlines.

Tasting menus are by no means a new invention. For decades, restaurants have offered multi-course dining experiences, often set around a certain theme or seasonal ingredients. These menus can be complemented by unique wine, beer, or spirits pairings, or can stand alone on their own merits.

Some restaurants chose to offer these tasting menus in addition to their regular menu, while others chose to run solely on one single, multi-coursed menu. Courses can range from a simple several course meal up to an exuberant 20+ courses and pricing can range from the reasonable to the lavish.

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Two Ways to Successfully Manage Minimum Wage Increases

Two Ways to Successfully Manage Minimum Wage Increases

By Brian Murphy, Foodable Contributor

2014 saw a minimum wage increase in 14 states and several cities throughout the nation. California and Massachusetts lead the way with an increase from $9 to $10, and more increases are imminent. The conversation is all over the news, in politics, and definitely on the mind of business owners and restaurateurs throughout the nation. Fear and worry is the knee-jerk reaction, as the already small profit margins in the hospitality industry appear to be squeezed out. The industry is an industry of people, on nearly every level. And those people are going to cost more in the next few years. California already has a plan to get to a $15 minimum wage. They sky is not falling. At least, it doesn’t have to. 

There are two ways that wise business owners will recognize as more important than ever and are late to the pity party if they haven’t already begun to plan for the future. Management and hiring are the two ways to make a tremendous impact on the business and perhaps stop the potential sting of higher employee wages.

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