How The World's First OatMeals Cafe Has Reimagined The Use of The Traditional Grain

“I really believe that if you start your day with oatmeal you normally make better decisions throughout the rest of your day… So, this brand has a lot of legs in today’s world,” says Stephens.


On this episode of Emerging Brands, Samantha Stephens, chef and founder of OatMeals shares with Foodable the origins of her single-ingredient fast casual concept and how she built it from the ground up.

OatMeals is the world’s first oatmeal cafe located in Greenwich Village, a neighborhood in New York known for its brownstones buildings. Stephens believes her brand in very on-trend right now especially with the rise of the health movement and all the benefits and versatility that oats have to offer.

What sets this concept apart is the fact that not only it is a business concept that revolves around oats, but also the fact that it aims to evaluate the way traditional breakfast meals involving oats have been regarded for decades.

“So, it’s a build-your-own toppings bar. We’re sort of putting a non-traditional twist on old-fashioned oatmeals...,” says Stephens. “The more and more I ate oatmeal the more I realized it’s very similar to risotto or rice… You could really think about it as like a savory side dish. It’s so versatile! It sort of adapts well to any kind of topping you put on it…”

Stephens went on to explain how she experimented with the grain by adding parmesan cheese, cheddar cheese, truffle oil, goat cheese, eggs, and bacon. She offers savory oatmeals as well as the traditional breakfast and sweet oatmeal offerings.

Listen to the podcast above to learn about how Samantha Stephens gained the confidence to build this business, the challenges she faces when figuring out a reasonable price point for her menu items, and how her concept aims to stay relevant in the food world in terms of trends.

To learn more about the Shark Tank-backed concept—OatMeals— check out the The Barron Report Live video interview below!

Millennial Food Founders Create Specialty RTD Super Coffee Brand KITU Life

Rising consumer demands and healthier diet trends are calling for more and more specialty products to fill the void in the market. One of the top trending diets, the ketogenic diet, currently ranks No. 4 on Foodable Labs’ “Top Diets by Social Mentions”.

Former college athlete and now KITU Life Founder, Jordan DeCicco, struggled to find a keto-approved healthy ready-to-drink (RTD) coffee option — so he created his own.

With millennial coffee consumption up 41% this year, according to Foodable Labs, it only makes sense that the world's first enhanced RTD coffee company is lead by millennials themselves: brothers Jordan, Jake, and Jim DeCicco.

On this episode of The Barron Report, Paul Barron discusses the specialty beverage market with Jordan and how he provided a solution to a gap in the specialty beverage market at such a young age.

Listen to this episode of The Barron Report to learn how this keto-approved beverage came to be, and for insights on how to build a brand as a young entrepreneur with little to no knowledge starting out.

SHOW NOTES

  • 16:25 - Facing a Knowledge Barrier: Managing a Brand Under the Age of 30

  • 19:30 - Strategies on Breaking into the Specialty Food Category

  • 24:39 - How to Tell What Your Company’s Worth Early On

  • 26:32 - Being on Shark Tank: Catapulting the Brand

  • 28:36 - What’s Next for KITU Life?


  • 01:18 - Dorm Room Passion Project Turns into KITU Life Super Coffee

  • 04:07 - The Booming Specialty Beverage Segment

  • 05:46 - What Makes Super Coffee Keto Diet Approved?

  • 07:14 - Challenges of Growing the Business as a Food Founder Under 30

  • 08:37 - Growing into 30 Whole Foods Locations in 6 Months

  • 11:29 - Launching & Co Packers: A Critical Point in a Brand’s Lifespan

 
 

Clawing Their Way to the Top: Q&A with Up and Comers, Cousins Maine Lobster

Clawing Their Way to the Top: Q&A with Up and Comers, Cousins Maine Lobster

Cousins Maine Lobster is not your typical lobster offering. You won’t find them serving hot, buttered lobster over a white tablecloth with champagne and caviar. Instead, you’ll find them slinging out traditional, buttered and toasted split-top rolls filled with chilled Maine lobster meat from their 19 food trucks, the way owners (and cousins) Jim Tselikis and Sabin Lomac say it should be.

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