This Butter-Poached Alaska Flounder Recipe Dazzles Guests in Oklahoma City

As both a chef and consumer, you can make a positive impact on the environment by what protein you pick for your meals.

Seafood, for example, is often more sustainable than other protein sources. But making a socially responsible decision about what fish to source involves doing your research and finding the right suppliers.

In the second season of Foodable’s Smart Kitchen & Bar, in partnership with Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute, chefs with a passion for sustainable seafood sourcing visit our kitchen to demonstrate some of their most popular fish-focused dishes. These chefs have developed a love and understanding of seafood. In this Seafood Season, prepare to learn new innovative recipes to ramp up your menu, while also being educated about the best sustainable seafood sourcing practices.

This season will also be available on Amazon Prime Video and Foodable On-Demand.

In the video above, you get a taste of Chef Chris McCabe in action as he walks us through how to cook his signature Butter Poached Alaska Flounder recipe with champagne sabayon, charred cauliflower, and a fried cod croquette.

As the culinary director of A Good Egg Dining Group in Oklahoma City, McCabe oversees five of the 12 restaurants in the group's portfolio. Seafood plays a major role on McCabe's menus and since he relies on this protein so heavily, he makes sure that the seafood he sources comes from responsibly managed fisheries and is sustainably caught, especially because this is so important to his guests.

Watch the full episode now on Amazon Prime Video or Foodable On-Demand.

Ensuring the Vitality of our Fish Supply for Years to Come is a Group Effort

It has become more important for restaurants to be socially responsible when it comes to serving seafood.

To ensure the vitality of our fish supply, we need to evolve our relationship with the ocean’s resources.

But how can suppliers and operators work together to achieve this common goal?

At our recent Foodable.io event in Seattle which was focused on the topic of seafood sustainability, we sat down with Jennifer Bushman, director of sustainability at Pacific Catch, Kami Couch, a filmmaker/fisherman from Alaska, and David Nichols, executive chef at Rider to discuss how each in different roles of the seafood supply process are making a sustainable impact.

Nowadays, consumers want to know where their protein is coming from. But to deliver this information, it is a group effort between supplier, distributor, and operator.

"For us, it's about making sure we know what's coming, holding our suppliers' accountable, watching it every day, training our staff because staff training is so exceptionally important, and then what the James Beard Foundation and others are calling 'storied fish,' which is when we close the loop with the marketing and engagement we have with the consumer so that we can tell those stories on the ground," says Bushman.

Then it's up to the operator to collect as much accurate information about the fish as possible and to pass it on to the team.

"This is still a very new movement, it's been making huge strides in the last few years and it's only going to continue to get better. On my end, it's about training my staff," says Nichols above.

By operators and chefs making an effort to better educate their customers and partners, this will only continue to give life to the sustainable movement.

Watch the full episode above to learn more about how we can improve our relationship with this vital ocean resource and some of the helpful apps out there revealing seafood sourcing information for chefs and consumers.