Sudden Coffee Is Changing The Way People Think About Instant Coffee

Instant coffee may be convenient, but the name traditionally revealed its bitter, inferior, and acidic taste. But, you know we love game changers at Foodable Network and on this episode of On Foodable Feature, we have the pleasure of introducing the exception to the rule.

Instant coffee has always been thought of as a last resort for coffee lovers, but now Sudden Coffee, a food technology company founded in San Francisco, is revolutionizing instant coffee. Co-Founder and CEO, Josh Zloof, graduated from Stanford University in 2008 as an Engineer. He went on to gain experience in multiple fields, including supply chain, lean management, and operations and is responsible for many start-ups, including an email service, an on-demand shopping service, and a coaching company. After experiencing much success and failure, Josh was able to discover what he is most passionate about—serving a delectable cup of coffee while focusing on the convenience and experience a consumer receives.

Throughout this episode, Josh explains how Sudden Coffee’s brewing method and coffee bean selection process differentiates their coffee from most instant coffee brands. In addition to using single origin coffee beans from specialty farms, Sudden Coffee uses a freeze-drying brewing process. This method preserves the aromatic features in their coffee, whereas most instant coffee brands use heat to boil their beans, destroying the flavor.

Not only is their brewing method a differentiating factor in their business, but their pricing is as well. While they currently use a subscription model, their products are available on Amazon and will soon be expanding to stores near you! Sudden Coffee hopes their prices will mirror a shocking $1.50 in the future. Not only are they innovative, but Sudden Coffee is aiming to be the most affordable instant coffee brand out there, as well.

Big Food is Fostering Innovation

Large corporations have been noticing how consumers have been favoring products made by independent startup food companies, since a good chunk of those provide craft, high-quality, niche, and, a lot of times, healthier products.

Needless to say, big food wants in. Especially, since this specialty food segment has a tremendous growth potential.

So, how is big food seeking innovation?

Companies like Campbell Soup, Chobani, Kellogg, Kraft Heinz, Nestlé, PepsiCo, and Tyson Foods are creating innovation centers and/or partnering with existing incubators to help niche brands grow and flourish.

PepsiCo

Pepsico’s new center for innovation is called “The Hive.”

According to Food Dive, “this incubator will be a separate entrepreneurial group outside of the core headquarters that will help nurture niche products already in the portfolio,” like for example Stubborn Soda.

As Foodable has reported in the past, PepsiCo also partnered with a Chicago-based, food and beverage incubator, The Hatchery, in order to look at other startup brands that have the potential of becoming a possible venture for the beverage giant.

Tyson Foods

Earlier this year, Tyson Foods announced that it will be working with two incubators—Plug and Play and 1871—linking the food giant to innovation hailing from Silicon Valley and Chicago.

That’s not the first time Tyson showed it’s commitment for innovation. In fact, the company launched a venture capital fund in late 2016 “to invest in companies developing breakthrough technologies, business models and products to sustainably feed the growing world population,” according to the company website.

Since then, Tyson has invested in brands like for example Beyond Meat, that promote sustainability and others that promote the internet of food, like FoodLogiq.

Tyson is spearheading innovation through its own brand, ¡Yappah!, which aims to fight food waste by utilizing “forgotten” ingredients like rescued vegetable puree and spent grain to make protein crisps, and investments in companies like Future Meat Technologies, an Israel-based “biotechnology company aiming to transform global meat production through distributive manufacturing of fat and muscle cells, increasing food safety and reducing ecological impact worldwide,” as stated in the company’s website.

Chobani

Chobani is another company looking to foster innovation through its Food Tech Residency. The company set out specific challenges in the food and agriculture value chain they would like to tackle (like food waste, food safety, water conservation, logistics, etc.) and invites like-minded, early-stage tech and agriculture startups to apply for funding.

Currently, the brand is hosting it’s fourth incubator class, since it launched the program in 2016, with companies developing products like tea, hummus and allergen-free baking ingredients. Alongside the food startups, two tech companies will be participating in Chobani’s inaugural Tech Residency Program—CinderBio and Skyven Technologies.

Watch the video above to learn more and stay tuned to other Industry Pulse episodes to keep up with all the innovation happening around your business! To learn about other consumer trends involving sustainability like plant-based meals, watch the video below:

Will Startup Hungry Planet™ Gain Momentum After Recent Success in a California School District?

Will Startup Hungry Planet™ Gain Momentum After Recent Success in a California School District?

A California school district began to offer plant-based meals across all their cafeterias this past academic year and had students choose whether or not they wanted to eat them based on taste. “The initiative was so successful, the meals will likely be offered again next year,” reports KEYT.

We’ve heard about companies like Impossible Food and Beyond Meat making their way in restaurants, but the Santa Barbara Unified School District actually sourced her plant-based protein from a startup based out of Missouri. It’s called Hungry Planet™.

According to the company’s website, it focuses on creating an alternative protein to ground beef, chicken, pork, Italian sausage, chorizo sausage, and crab for culinary professionals to use as a 1:1 substitution in innovative entrees. The company says it develops its faux meats to delight the demanding tastes of meat lovers in the heart of the Midwest.

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Meat Giant Tyson Foods Invests In Startup Growing Meat From Animal Cells

Meat Giant Tyson Foods Invests In Startup Growing Meat From Animal Cells

When a meat giant like Tyson Foods invests in a lab-grown startup like Memphis Meats, people pay attention.

Tyson Ventures announced earlier this week that it has secured a minority investment in the startup that is growing meat out of animal cells.

This is not the first time Memphis Meats makes headlines, though. The startup also has high-profile investors like Bill Gates and Richard Branson.

Memphis Meats’ mission is “to change the way meat gets to your plate,” with the goal to produce authentic meat without having to feed, breed and kill real animals. They aim to achieve this by developing a way to produce real meat in a lab from animal cells.

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