Google-Backed, Veggie Milk Could Have Lowest Eco-Footprint in Dairy Industry

Google-Backed, Veggie Milk Could Have Lowest Eco-Footprint in Dairy Industry

You’ve heard of alternative milk made from soy, almond, coconut and rice… but have you heard of a plant-based milk made from yellow peas?

That’s right!

Ripple, a startup backed by $44 million from Google and venture capitalists from Silicon Valley is selling alternative milk that not only has a clean taste, but also has just as much protein as that made from cows, reports “Bloomberg.”

It’s perfect timing since Foodable recently reported that there may be a milk shortage, or at least a milk price hike, due to globalization.

Alternative milk might just be the solution, especially if it’s eco-friendly and high in protein.

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From Clubs to Inexpensive Private Labels— How to Get in on the #WineTrend

Whether people are drinking more wine to get through the week #WineWednesday or to simply save the wine bottle corks for their next Pinterest project, wine culture has become increasingly popular in the U.S. showing a steady upwards growth in consumption year over year.

Wine Pouring

After all, the U.S. has about 9,091 wineries, with California vineyards accounting for about 87 percent of the total U.S. wine production, giving Americans plenty of options to choose from when it comes to New World wines alone.

The bottom line is wine is trending and big corporations, as well as consumers, are taking notice and doing something about it— from creating house wine to forming wine clubs.

While California, the fourth largest producer of wine in the world, celebrates their annual harvest in September, Target Corp., the discount store retailer, debuted its own private label of $5 wine called California Roots earlier that month.

California Roots

Although details about the production of this bull’s-eye brand have not yet been disclosed, five different varieties (Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Moscato, Pinot Grigio and a Red Blend) of the economic wine can be found in 1,100 Target stores.

Other discount store retailers, like Trader Joe’s, have been producing their own wine lines for some time now, but even though Target is just now launching this new bargain wine brand to compete with the likes of Charles Shaw or ‘Two Buck Chuck’ (now $2.99/bottle), the corporation does have previous experience selling the popular alcoholic grape beverage. Target’s Wine Cube line sourced through Trinchero Family Estates, has been sold in specific markets for years now proving to be a contender amongst other boxed wine brands.

Many different factors account into the price point a wine is sold. Some include whether the wine was mass produced or it was made in small-batches; if barrels were used or not during wine production; the weight and type of material used to contain the wine; what type of cork is used for bottled wine; the amount of wine that can be shipped at once; not to mention the quality of the soil where the grapes grow and how they interact with the climate in that specific location along with the appropriate care that is necessary to harvest the best grapes.

Earlier this year, Business Insider reported on how Charles Shaw wines continue to maintain such competitive prices. Foodable has reached out to Target Corporation to learn more about the production details of California Root wines and how the company can keep a low price tag. Target has not yet responded.

While Target and Trader Joe’s begin to go head to head with their inexpensive wine lines, the CEO of Vayner Media, Gary Vaynerchuk, is weighing interest on Twitter after he posted an idea for a fun new wine club to get in on the trend.

He posted two screenshots of an iMessage conversation to his friends, labeled ‘Wine Trash Talk,’ declaring “I want people to literally make fun of their friends for buying wine elsewhere lol.”

The idea is for club members to pay $50 a month in order to get four wine bottles ranging from different varieties (Red, White, Rosé, and Sparkling) delivered to their homes for no shipping fee. His promise? “...It’s either a sick, sick deal, or a stunning new find, or something really hot and hard to get…,” claims Vaynerchuck promising to surprise people with great value wines.

The vlogger and podcaster is asking people who are interested to specify in a google form whether they would like to join the four, six or 12-month-long club.

Target Partners With Instacart, Tests Out Food Delivery

In our ever-growing “want it now” culture, it’s no surprise that on-demand food delivery has become what it is. No matter the reason — we’re busy, we’re lazy, there’s too much traffic — technology has molded our perception to where we feel inconvenienced by anything that will take us away from our robotic multi-tasking. And brands are cashing in on this behavior — but not just restaurants, like Pinkberry and Wow Bao, both which use Postmates. Grocery giants (Publix, Stop & Shop, Whole Foods), media companies (Amazon) and technology brands (Google, Uber) are all trying to get a piece of the food delivery pie.

The newest in line? Minneapolis-based Target. It was recently announced that the retail store, commonly known for customers’ inability to leave with only what they initially intended to buy, is partnering with Instacart for same-day grocery delivery. However, as most cases go, the partnership will begin with an experimental phase in the Minneapolis market only before branching out. Target employees will sort the orders and grab products off the shelf and Instacart drivers will deliver them.

This off-brand, third-party disconnect could present problems, as with any third-party service, since Instacart employees will be the only consumer-facing role in the exchange. And while delivery options should remain an option for customers who can’t make it in store, so as not to direct them to the competition, the in-store experience must continue to provide added value, if not more so. Think about it: if customers choose to go the Instacart route to avoid the in-store experience because of sentiment reasons, they’re much less apt to make last-minute purchase decisions. Read More