Chefs Share Their Three Favorite Techniques in the Kitchen

Chefs Share Their Three Favorite Techniques in the Kitchen

By Kerri Adams, Editor-at-Large

If every chef cooked the same, the culinary industry wouldn’t be the diverse one it is today.

There are so many different techniques a chef can choose to use in their kitchen and let’s face it, each culinary mastermind has their favorites.

We decided to ask chefs from all over the country the same question to see what methods they rely on the most. Check out what these stellar chefs had to say. 

What are three techniques in the kitchen that you couldn't cook without?

James Knappett, head chef of London’s Kitchen Table:

  1. Cooking over charcoal. We use pure English wood at Kitchen Table, it’s very interesting to see the changes of flavour that charcoal brings, naturally changing the characteristics of vegetables and meat with that flavour.
  2. Pickling is one of our big techniques – we find that the best part of this method is being able to use vegetables later on in the year when they aren’t naturally in season. Through thinking ahead and clever preparation and organization, this opens up a wider range of vegetables to us all year round. Another element of preservation that we use at Kitchen Table, is the use of high acidity vinegar. If you make the vinegars to a high enough acidity, raw carrots for example, have actually been broken down through fermentation process and been cooked in the vinegar – a taste that most of our guests haven’t experienced before.
  3. Roasting in the pan. We cook everything we can in the pan. It’s a traditional method, using thyme, garlic, bay leaves and butter and is sometimes seen as an old school way compared to sous-vide cookery. It is one of the first techniques you learn as a chef, and is still very much present in Kitchen Table's method of cooking.
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Where Have All the Top Chefs Gone?

Photo Credit: NPR

Photo Credit: NPR

As the old adage goes, if you can't take the heat, get out of the kitchen . In New York, it seems that many chefs are, but not because of the pressure.

Not long ago, top New York Chefs like Peter Hoffman didn't have to look very hard for experienced line cooks. Now, there seems to be a mass exodus of chefs from New York to other areas.  Some believe there's a chef shortage because quality chefs are finding smaller areas to work in - ones with local ingredients more appealing than New York. But that's not the only reason. Read More