To Follow or Not to Follow a Trend? 4 Tips to Help You Decide

To Follow or Not to Follow a Trend? 4 Tips to Help You Decide

By Salar Sheik, Foodable Industry Expert

Trends are nothing new to us in the world of hospitality. As soon as we open our eyes and mouths, we see and taste fondue, martinis, gourmet burgers, protein everything, low carb, no gluten, or even Sriracha on Sriracha.

All trends seem to plateau sooner rather than later, but few ride along in full force before something takes its place or someone slanders its status. All types of foodservice outlets need to take note of trends and why they rise and fall. Quick-service, full service, fine dining, and caterers are all subjected to reviews as customers are quick to judge as soon as they read over your menu or glance over at your Instagram page and start to #hashtag.

Understanding the trend origins is key in judging which to follow or not to follow. Use the following tips as your guide.

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Seattle Chefs Discuss the Challenges of Winter Sourcing While Maintaining Local, Seasonal Menus

Seattle Chefs Discuss the Challenges of Winter Sourcing While Maintaining Local, Seasonal Menus

By L.M. Archer, Foodable Contributor

Are you a hypocrite if you ‘outsource’ menu items advertised as ‘locally grown’ during the dearth of winter?

Many Seattle chefs reliant on regional abundance face this dilemma. In a town that prides itself on authenticity, transparency, and sustainability, the problem proves notjust a logistical one, but an ethical one. “Can I look my guests in the eye and still feel good about what I’m serving?”

How Seattle-area chefs deal with scarcity varies. Yet few fail to overcome the obstacle.

Here, FoodableTV shares Seattle top chefs’ secrets to dealing with winter sourcing challenges:

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Seattle Restaurant Operator Fights To Feature Marijuana On Menu

5 Point Cafe  | Facebook

5 Point Cafe | Facebook

Following a number of other states who are currently featuring marijuana-infused dishes, local Seattle restaurant operator Dave Meinert of 5 Point Cafe is looking to include the drug in several dishes on his menu. While marijuana is legal for both medicinal and recreational use in Washington, Meinert has run into legal opposition as the state currently does not have a provision that allows for marijuana use inside restaurants with liquor licenses.

"If the lawmakers don't do something about it i'll look into running an initiative or something like they're doing in Denver," said Dave Meinert. Will marijuana become the next trending food ingredient? Read More

Seattle's Top 3 Meat Purveyors Serve Up the City's Finest Charcuterie

Seattle's Top 3 Meat Purveyors Serve Up the City's Finest Charcuterie

By L.M. Archer, Foodable Contributor

With consumers’ craving for charcuterie on the rise, Seattle’s thriving artisan cured meat scene brings home more than just the bacon. Charcuterie, the french style of curing, preserving, and smoking meats, includes savory mainstays like bacon, ham, and sausage, as well as pâtés, terrines, and confits. But Seattleites also enjoy their salumi, the Italian style of salt-cured, aged, dried meats - typically pork. 

Here, a trio of Seattle’s most successful cured meat purveyors share their secrets to success:

Salumi Artisan Cured Meats | Pioneer Square 

Everyone has a retirement dream. For Armandino Batali, former Boeing Process Control Engineer and father of culinary phenom Mario Batali, that dream was salumi. Started in 2002, Salumi Artisan Cured Meats pays homage to Armandino Batali’s maternal grandfather, founder of Seattle’s first Italian food import shop, Merlino’s.

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Umami Tsunami : Exploring the Fifth Flavor in Seattle

Umami Tsunami : Exploring the Fifth Flavor in Seattle

By L.M. ArcherFoodable Contributor

You know the five fundamental flavors, don’t you? Sweet, salty, sour, bitter...and umami.  The Japanese term umami, loosely translated, means ‘satisfying, savory taste.’ But asking a Japanese person to define ‘umami’ is like asking a French person to define ‘terroir’ - both terms denote far more nuances than any translation allows.  And though a Japanese word, the concept of umami dates back at least as far as the Roman Empire, to a time when fermented fish paste called garum proved the favored condiment.

Tokyo professor Dr. Kikunae Ikeda officially ‘discovered’ umami in 1908, convinced of ‘another taste’ beyond salty, sweet, sour and bitter in his Japanese staple ‘kombu dashi’ - a fish and dried kelp broth.  That other flavor turned out to be glutamate, an amino acid which appears naturally in meats, fish, and dairy products. Japanese scholars also later concluded that inosinic acid and guanosine monophosphate (GMP) form additional components of umami. 

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