Are Meat-Free Delicatessens The Next Big Thing In Foodservice?

If 2018 wasn't 2019 will be the year of the vegan, and we should all be excited about that. Because whether you agree with it or not we all need to have more vegetables on our plates. Vegans are merely pushing the food industry to get better and challenging non-vegans to think about their food an where it comes from and what the costs are to our environment and our health.

Atlas is a Meat-Free Delicatessen that provides healthy and nutritious plant-based food, without losing sight of why people enjoy comfort food and their food quality and flavors are taking the Miami market by storm.

I got the unique opportunity to meet the founders of Atlas Meat-Free Delicatessen Ryan and Amanda Bauhaus, and to try some of their food. Their backgrounds are not in food, but these two came together as a couple, and embarked on a mission to bring delicious vegan food to the vegan or vegetarian curious.

Ryan and Amanda are aware of the stigmas the vegans have come to represent and have formulated their brand to make sure they were not preaching to people but rather inspiring people, and they are inspiring people with great food.

Ryan and Amanda call their food "low food tech" - From buttermilk fried chicken to mozzarella cheese, This is real food made through careful experimentation to make vegan food accessible, delicious, and familiar.

Show Notes

  • 14:26 - Does the word vegan have a negative connotation?

  • 19:26 - Let the food speak for itself

  • 43:13 - Ryan? Are you a mad scientist?

  • 1:50 - Meat :) Ryan and Amanda Baubaus, founders of Atlas Meat-Free Delicatessen.

  • 4:43 - Becoming Vegans

  • 10:54 - How did the idea of Atlas come about?


Research by:

Nathan Mikita

Nathan Mikita

Director of New Media/Producer


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52 Percent of Shoppers are Buying More Plant-based Products

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Although a lot of turkeys are being consumed today, more consumers are embracing a plant-based lifestyle.

According to yet another study, 52 percent of U.S. shoppers are eating more plant-based foods and beverages.

Apparently, these consumers don't think this is just a fad diet either.

In the study by DuPont Nutrition & Health, 60 percent of those surveyed plan to keep the switch to plant-based foods permanent because they feel healthier being on this diet.

“There is a seismic shift occurring in eating habits globally, creating a significant market opportunity. Most important, our research reveals that for most consumers, this has moved beyond experimentation into a permanent change brought on by health, lifestyle and social factors,” said Greg Paul, DuPont official in a press release about the study.

Read more about the Dupont study at “bizwomen” now.

This year, there have been multiple studies reporting similar findings.

According to Nielsen, 40 percent of Americans are trying to eat more plant-based foods.

Kimpton's 2019 Culinary & Cocktails Trend Forecast by Kimpton Hotels and Restaurants group said that the plant-based movement is going into overdrive in 2019.

Plant-based sales reached $3.3 billion this year, as reported by Nielsen.

But that's just the beginning. The plant-based industry is expected to be worth $5.2 billion in sales by 2020, according to Oregon-based Allied Market Research (AMR.)

When tracking social data pulled from Foodable Labs, we saw that plant-based consumption is up by 300 percent over the last year. Specifically, 51 percent of chefs have added vegan menu items to their menus this year, which is a 31 percent increase from last year.

Learn more about the plant-based movement and how it is here to stay in the video below.

Whether You’re a Foodie or an Aspiring Chef, These Are the Miami Food Halls You Don’t Want to Miss

In the past few of years, there has been a powerful surge of food hall concepts popping up across the country and in late 2017 the wave finally arrived in Miami, Florida. Since then, many food hall concepts have been opening in the area especially in the first half of this year.

On this episode of On Foodable Side Dish, we meet three food hall operations featuring three very different concepts. First, we get the chance to meet Alex Cuevas, founder of Vshops—the world’s first 100 percent vegan food hall. Then, we sit down with Ruben Paredes, the Director of Operations of Miami’s first food hall—1-800-Lucky—serving up Asian cuisine. Finally, we get to hear from Kenzie Motai, Assistant General Manager of St. Roche Market, Miami —a contemporary food hall serving as a platform for up and coming chefs.

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Vshops

Alex Cuevas, Founder and CEO of Vshops is a former senior technology executive who gave up his prominent tech career in New York to pursue his true passion for sustainable food, health, and animal welfare. At 10 years old, Cuevas had decided to go vegan after he found out how animals were being treated in factory farms.

“...the way the animals were treated and then the way they were “dispatched” or put down, it was incredibly disturbing to me,” said Cuevas. “... and when I realized that my favorite foods were tied to the suffering I said I don’t want anything to do with it at all.”

Cuevas decided to open up his first Miami vegan concept, Choices Cafe, in 2011 after a frustrating trip to South Florida, where he had a hard time finding a place to eat that would cater to the vegan lifestyle he was accustomed to. Now with the Vshops food hall, Cuevas not only aims to cater to vegans, but his hope is to really impress non-vegans in order to inspire consciousness.

Check out the episode above to learn about all the different vegan concepts that reside within the Vshops food hall located in the Miami neighborhood of Coconut Grove!

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1-800-Lucky

Ruben Paredes takes time out of his day to break down for us all of the concepts within Miami’s first food hall—1-800-Lucky. Paredes, who was recruited by Sven Vogtland (one of the people behind Wynwood’s Coyo Taco), has been working in the hospitality/restaurant industry for two decades, but this is the first time he has dedicated himself to working for a concept like this one.

“I personally think that after all my years in this industry… for me, this format is the best,” said Paredes. In his words, 1-800-Lucky is a concept that provides a combination of “great food, great offerings... it’s simple, casual, it’s fast.”

Whatever Asian culinary craving a person may have, 1-800-Lucky is bound to have it for its guests. The Asian food hall provides Chinese barbecue (Lotus + Cleaver), dim sum (YIP), Vietnamese sandwiches (Les Banh Amis), traditional ramen (Hayato Miami), poke (PokeOG), ice cream (Taiyaki), and handmade sushi rolls (Myumi). It’s important to note that each food stand derives from a larger restaurant brand from across the globe.

Check out the episode above to see the food and drinks being featured at 1-800-Lucky!

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St. Roch Market

Kenzie Motai, who joined the St. Roch family in December of 2017, sat down with us to explain the concept of this food hall hailing all the way from New Orleans. St. Roch Market first opened in Miami in late February of this year and it boasts 11 unique food vendors while providing 1 central bar for its guests.

“Each vendor is a small business owner and entrepreneur,” says Motai. “We’re kind of the place you come to, to see the next up-and-coming chef in Miami before they blow up and open their own restaurant.”

As Motai explains, St. Roch Market is a historic market from New Orleans that has been around since 1875. It was rebuilt after Hurricane Katrina to be made into a food hall and now serves as a great platform for chefs to start their business.

Check out the episode above to hear about the experience from a chef working at St. Roch Market food hall!


If you’d like to learn more about other concepts by Sven Vogtland, like Wynwood’s Coyo Taco, check out the video below!

White Castle Expands the Impossible Slider to All Store Menus

Back in April, the fast food chain White Castle added the Impossible Slider, a plant-based mini burger to the menus of 140 of its chains in New York, New Jersey, and Chicago area.

In partnership with Impossible Foods, the chain has announced that it will be expanding the menu item nationwide.

The Impossible Burger has become wildly popular among vegetarians and flexitarians. The veggie burger that looks so much like the traditional beef burger that it even bleeds.

The ingredient soy leghemoglobin, which causes the burger to "bleed," is made from soybean plants. The ingredient got regulatory pushback from the Food and Drug Administration (F.D.A.) last August but was officially approved two months ago.

Impossible Foods, which has garnered over $250 million in investment, aims to bring veggie burgers to the fast food lovin' masses.

“White Castle’s model has been often imitated but never duplicated -- an impressive feat in the hypercompetitive fast-food sector,” said Patrick O. Brown, Impossible Foods’ Founder in the press release from April announcing the companies' partnership. “We look forward to working closely with White Castle, and together learning how to popularize plant-based meat with mainstream burger lovers.”

Evidently' White Castle's Impossible Slider test was well-received.

"Our Cravers definitely developed a hunger for the Impossible Slider," said Lisa Ingram, White Castle's CEO. "Sales easily exceeded our expectations."

The slider is topped with cheddar cheese, pickles, onion, and the White Castle signature 2-inch-squared bun.

But the Impossible Burger isn't the only veggie burger that "bleeds." Impossible Food's biggest rival, Beyond Meat also has a burger that bleeds, but this is merely just beet juice. Beyond Meat was the first plant-based burger to be sold in the meat section of grocery stores.

The good news is that there appears to be room for both of these plant-based companies. Plant-based consumption is up over 300 percent over the last year.

Learn all about the plant-based movement in the video below.

Read more about White Castle rolling out the Impossible Slider nationwide at "CNBC" now.

Elegant Creamy Vegan Dessert Recipes Using Plant-based Milks

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Watch this episode on

  • Plant-based chef Nathi Toro uses nut milk and natural emulsifiers to make creamy vegan desserts.

  • Using a blender, a food processor, and a freezer, these desserts are totally raw vegan.

In this episode of Foodable’s Smart Kitchen we dive deep into the Raw Vegan realm to create desserts that will delight even the most luxurious of palettes. Our plant-based chef, Nathi Toro,  introduces us to the magic of hazelnuts using both the nut and nut milk to create a velvety hazelnut tart and creamy vegan panna cotta.

How do you make a vegan panna cotta you ask? You'll have to watch the episode for all the details, but the secret is agar-agar, a plant-based gelatin that gives the dessert its signature texture.

Adding vegan items to your menu is a no-brainer as consumers continue to trend towards healthier, more mindful food choices. Don’t disqualify yourself simply because you don’t offer plant-based options. Using ingredients already in your pantry, you could be offering easy vegan dishes, placing your brand at the top of the list for this new breed of foodie.

Find the recipe for Nathi's delectable desserts below and watch the episode for tips and tricks to creating these addictive sweets!

Hazelnut Chocolate Tart

Filling
1 ½ cups cashews, soaked
½ cup hazelnut milk
½ cup maple syrup
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
¼ teaspoon salt
¾ teaspoon soy lecithin
¾ cup coconut oil, melted
¾ cup cacao powder

Blend all ingredients, except cacao powder and coconut oil, until completely smooth. Gradually stream in melted coconut oil while the blender is running. Add cacao powder in thirds, blending until thoroughly combined each time. Continue to blend until completely smooth. Pour filling over prepared crust and let set in freezer. Once frozen, remove from pan and cut tart into long triangular slices.

Crust
1 cup hazelnuts
2 ½ tablespoons coconut sugar
¼ teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon cacao butter, melted
½ tablespoon coconut oil, melted

In a blender, pulse hazelnuts, ½ cup at a time, for 2-3 second increments until the hazelnuts turn to a fine flour-like consistency. Sift and return any large pieces of hazelnut to the blender and pulse again. Be careful not to over blend or the hazelnuts will turn into hazelnut butter rather than a meal. Mix the hazelnut meal and the remaining ingredients by hand. Press crust flat into a 1/6 pan lined with parchment. Smooth and level the top with an offset spatula.

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Hazelnut Milk
1 cup hazelnuts, soaked
3 cups water

Blend above ingredients until hazelnuts are well broken down. Separate the hazelnut pulp from the milk using a chinois or a nut milk bag. Dehydrate any remaining hazelnut pulp to use as hazelnut flour.

Chocolate Shard
½ cup cacao powder
½ cup cacao butter, melted
¼ cup agave
pinch salt

In a mixing bowl, whisk all ingredients until well combined. Pour chocolate onto a parchment-lined sheet pan. Let set in the freezer and once firm, break into pieces.  Store frozen.

Vanilla Panna Cotta with Raspberry sauce

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Panna Cotta
½ cup coconut meat
1 cup cashews, soaked
½ cup almond milk
¼ cup + 2 tablespoons raw agave or maple syrup
¼ cup Agar Agar solution with 1.0% Agar Agar*
½ tablespoon vanilla extract
½ vanilla pod, scraped
½ cup coconut oil

Blend all ingredients until smooth. Pour into semi-sphere silicone molds and place in the freezer for 30-60 minutes or until set.

Raspberry sauce
1 lb frozen raspberries
1 tablespoon agar-agar
½ cup agave

Blend all ingredients until smooth. Strain.

To make agar solution with 1.0% Agar Agar:

  1. Weigh your panna cotta mixture.

  2. Weigh 1 cup of water.

  3. Add the totals together to get the weight of your entire recipe.

  4. Multiply total by 0.01. This amount is what you need to weigh out in agar powder.

  5. Add the cup of water to a saucepan and heat. When it starts to simmer add the measured Agar Agar. Bring to a boil and stir for 3 - 4 minutes.

  6. Measure a ¼ cup of this solution and blend with rest of mixture. Pour into molds. Let set in refrigerator until ready to serve, then remove.

For example: Your mixture = 110g. Cup of water = 250g. Total = 360g.

360g x 0.01 = 3.6g

Therefore, you need to weigh 3.6g agar. Then add to 1 cup water and proceed as per the recipe.