Trump Admin Pledges to Give $12 Billion in Additional Aid to Farmers

Trump Admin Pledges to Give $12 Billion in Additional Aid to Farmers

President Donald Trump has repeatedly promised to protect American farmers, but the recent "trade war" has made the farming industry nervous.

Tuesday, the Trump Administration announced that it is rolling out an additional $12 billion in aid for farmers to help keep them afloat during the trade negotiations. 

"The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Tuesday that it will utilize a Great Depression-era law to send payments to producers of dairy, hogs and certain crops. It will also purchase surpluses of commodities including fruits, nuts, rice, beef, pork and milk and distribute them to food banks and other nutrition programs. And the agency will work with the private sector to develop new export markets for farmers," writes "CNN." 

Several farm groups have applauded the decision, saying it's a step in the right direction. But they also warned that as the trade war progresses, the more of a negative impact it could have on the farming industry. 

China is the largest market for farmers in the U.S. and Canada and Mexico are also big importers from American farms. 

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Urban Agriculture Startup Gotham Greens Closes $29 Million Round of Funding

Urban Agriculture Startup Gotham Greens Closes $29 Million Round of Funding

Gotham Greens, a technologically advanced urban agriculture startup, has closed a $29 million Series C financing round, bringing its total equity funding to $45 million, according to Fortune.

The Brooklyn-based company says the same investors that have backed them from the beginning continue to invest. “They’re sticking with the company. They like the profitability and the returns,” says co-founder and CEO Viraj Puri.

But a new investor, global investment company Creadev, joined the club with a “significant” investment. Creadev is funded by the Mulliez family– one of the wealthiest families in France.

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Washington Report: The Stakes for American Agriculture as Trump Moves Toward Building the Wall

In his first 14 days in office, President Trump has signed seven executive orders, many of which have come under fire like the "7-Nation Ban." Despite the continued protests have continued, Trump seems to be following the platform he set during his campaign.

One of President Trump’s campaign promises was to build a border wall between the United States and Mexico. In line with that platform, he signed an executive order on January 25 that directed the immediate construction of a border wall using federal funds. Thus far, no construction has taken place.

Mexico-American relations have been strained since Trump first proposed the border wall idea. He insisted that Mexico would pay for the wall however, Mexican officials have repeatedly stated they would not.

What effect could this strained relationship with Mexico have on our agriculture industry and food costs?

Imports coming into the U.S. from Mexico have been a hot topic because of proposed methods of paying for the border wall. Mexico is the United States' second largest supplier of agricultural imports, with U.S. agricultural imports totalling $21 billion in 2015.

Not many people have considered America’s exports to Mexico and how they may be affected. Mexico is United States' third largest agricultural export market, with the U.S. sending $17.7 billion dollars of agricultural goods to Mexico in 2016. These goods include corn, soybeans, dairy, pork, and beef.

Keep up with On Foodable Weekly’s Washington Reports to stay informed on political happenings surrounding the restaurant industry.

What a Farmer Can Teach a Chef

What a Farmer Can Teach a Chef

The Conundrum

I was working at a large resort a few years ago, killing the prep list for our New Year’s celebration. Running up to the last several hours before execution, I found myself in front of a six-foot griddle getting ready to sear off two thousand U10 scallops. As I started popping the lids off of the containers, I was amazed at how beautifully uniform every single one was. I set myself to the task at hand as my mind began to wander, imagining what it must have taken to have harvested and sorted all of the scallops. Had it been a labor of love or just another shipment to get out?

Earlier in the morning, as I walked into the prep kitchen to rally the crew, I was taken aback at the pallets and hand trucks stacked with the product for the event. When one is prepping for a thousand people, it doesn’t leave much room for reflection, yet I wondered — more than once that day — where had all of this stuff come from? Had factory farms and ranches been involved or did some product represent smaller operations? How much had come from our partners in the adjacent valley or did it even matter? My thoughts at that moment were more practical than romantic; there were mouths to feed, after all, and purveyors to thank.

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