Food Delivery Discount Service Increases Sales During Restaurant Off-Peak Hours

Food Delivery Discount Service Increases Sales During Restaurant Off-Peak Hours

hough delivery has proven to be a huge market with the likes of UberEats and Grubhub snatching up restaurant dollars, it has also proven to be extremely expensive for operators and, consequently, for consumers.

According to Forbes, Restaurants could pay anywhere between 11% and 45% commission on each order if they sign up for a delivery service. And while restaurants admit that adding these services improve order numbers and total revenue, these rates are huge. And the delivery fees on the consumer side aren’t tiny either.

Two entrepreneurial brothers based in NYC noticed this issue while scouring for promo codes and coupons to lower their delivery order prices. Wondering, ‘why isn’t there some sort of food delivery happy hour’ Mohamed and Sidi Ahmed Merzouk set out to create this type of app.

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Top Bar and Restaurant Trends in 2018

Top Bar and Restaurant Trends in 2018

Year after year, consumers, and foodies alike obsess over a new trend that drives where they are going to eat. For bars and restaurants, these trends can be determined by the demographics of recurring visitors, national trends, or advances in technology. Almost halfway into 2018, Foodable has determined the top 2018 trends for bars and restaurants.

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The Facebook Data Debacle

The Facebook Data Debacle
  • 1:06 - The Story of Cambridge Analytica and Facebook

  • 4:44 - The First Violation

  • 5:52 - The Value Proposition of FB: You Cant Opt Out

  • 7:07 - The Rise of Social Media Data Gathering

  • 10:19 - The Impact on Restaurants

  • 11:25 - Foodable Labs Analyzes Facebook Engagement

  • 15:18 - Can Facebook bounce back?

  • 17:20 - Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos

  • 20:17 - Facebook Social Restaurant Visits DOWN 17%

  • 21:47 - Foodable Plus: 10 Tips for Preparing for the Mass Exodus of Facebook

Facebook has been dominating news headlines this week and for good reason. CEO Mark Zuckerberg has been testifying to Congress on the topics of data security and how the social media giant has been trying to improve.

There’s a lot to consider here: How did this impact the election? Is my data safe? Is it finally time to get off the grid?

But before we take drastic measures, take a minute to join Paul Barron for a thought-provoking discussion about what happened and how this scandal may be affecting your restaurant. Didn’t think about that? No worries, we’ll cover everything from how users are engaging with your FB content to how this data debacle is impacting your restaurant sales.

Cambridge Analytica

This is where our story begins. Cambridge Analytica hired a professor to create a Facebook app that collected user data. You’ve seen those fun but useless personality quiz apps on Facebook, right? Right. Users who authorized this app gave the app access to their data like their "Likes". But not just their own data, the data of their entire friend network. This feature was removed in 2014 but the damage was already done.

The important thing to note here is that, up to this point, Cambridge Analytica hadn’t done anything wrong. This was completely legal and in line with Facebook's guidelines in 2014. But when the professor sold the data to Cambridge Analytica, that’s when they violated the Facebook user agreement, which prohibited the sale of Facebook data to third party companies. Facebook removed the professor’s app and demanded that he and all third parties immediately destroy the data but up until now it is believed that Cambridge Analytica still has some or all of the data.

The Impact on Restaurants

Now people across the globe are understandably upset. There are a number of arguments to be made. But what does all this commotion mean for the restaurant industry? Well, as Paul explains, Facebook engagement is down meaning you’ll be having a harder time connecting with your audience using the platform. Social Restaurant Visits through FB are also down.

So, is it time to jump off the Facebook bandwagon? Listen in and find out!

And after you listen to this podcast, join us on Foodable Plus for 10 Tips to Prepare You for the Mass Exodus of Facebook.

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Restaurants Use Apps to Make Big Bucks Serving Nothing

Restaurants Use Apps to Make Big Bucks Serving Nothing

Restaurants have long suffered from slim margins and too-often empty dining rooms. So tech companies are stepping in to match those empty seats with needy customers looking for something other than a bite to eat. As the “New York Post” reports, people are now able to use phone apps to rent out restaurant dining rooms, coat-check areas, and even bathrooms, providing operators with some easy extra cash.

Apps like Luluapp, which will connect those in desperate need of a restroom with the nearest available restroom, for a fee. The app says it has already signed up more than 100 New York restaurants and bars ahead of its summer launch. Users can pay anywhere between 99 cents and $5 for a restroom and restaurants receive 65% of the fee.

Bagbnb is a Rome-based luggage storage startup that works with bars and restaurants across the globe to rent out coat checks so vistors can leave their bags behind while roaming the city.

The app splits its $6, per-bag fee with restaurants and has expanded by offering commissions to tour operators, Airbnb hosts and hotels for suggesting its services to their lodgers.

A Penn Station restaurant, Pennsylvania 6, pulls in about $2,000 a month from storing people’s bags for a few hours or for the day, according to manager Chelsea Feldcher. She adds that about 25 percent of those customers end up grabbing a drink or meal at the eatery before they catch their train.

And KettleSpace, a six-month-old startup, has inked about half a dozen deals with restaurants and bars to open their dining rooms to freelancers and entrepreneurs during the off hours. It charges its laptop-toting clientele from $25 for 10 hours to $99 a month for unlimited access to use the restaurant spaces, where free coffee, snacks, and meals are sometimes part of the deal. By comparison, WeWork’s least expensive plan in New York costs $220 a month. 

“It’s newfound money for us,” said nightclub owner Ravi Patel, whose Hotel Chantelle recently opened up its rooftop lounge — and its retractable roof — to KettleSpace workers.

“This has the potential to reach $3,000 to $5,000 a week for us, which could slash my rent by up to 30 percent,” Patel said.

Read more about how these apps are increasing restaurant revenue at “New York Post.”

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Yext is Driving Restaurant Discovery and Online Orders

Yext is Driving Restaurant Discovery and Online Orders

It’s no secret we live in a very competitive restaurant environment.

Not only do we have more cuisine options, but we have more brick-and-mortars that offer different atmospheres and experiences than ever before.

There’s also the increasing shift towards online ordering and food delivery by consumers with a fast-paced lifestyle who are looking for convenience and speed.

Needless to say, restaurant visits have been declining year over year and it’s more important than ever to capitalize on the few opportunities available to amp foot traffic to your restaurants.

So how can restaurants maximize visibility in such a saturated environment?

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