McCain Foodservice Has Added IPA Beer Battered Onion Rings to Its Portfolio

McCain Foodservice Has Added IPA Beer Battered Onion Rings to Its Portfolio

McCain® Foodservice is jumping on the craft beer bandwagon. The frozen food supplier has added onion rings battered in Brew City® IPA Beer to its expansive portfolio. 

McCain® is taking this beloved appetizer to the next level by incorporating the consumers' recent craft beer obsession. 

According to a recent press release by McCain, "craft beer has grown 16 percent compared to domestics and imports in the last four years."

The onion rings still offer that sweet onion flavor, but also has a hoppy flavor from the Brew City IPA beer. 

McCain® is anticipating that this appetizer will help to increase check averages and recommend that the rings are served with dipping sauces, like chipotle ranch and orange marmalade. 

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Sustainable Brew Practices: How the Industry is Raising the Bar

Sustainable Brew Practices: How the Industry is Raising the Bar

By Kerri Adams, Editor-at-Large

Terms like local, sustainable and organic­– are not just buzz words to appeal to today’s eco-friendly consumer. These are all part of green initiatives by the food and beverage industry as a whole.

With the growing popularity of both the craft beer and sustainable movement, brewers across the nation are doing their part to raise the bar with more eco-friendly practices. 

We sat down with Cheri Chastain, the sustainability manager at Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. and the co-chair of the sustainability committee of the Brewers Association to pick her brain about the latest eco-friendly brewing practices and how the industry is doing its best to lessen that carbon footprint on the environment. 

Foodable: What were some of the initial challenges for the breweries that started to adopt more sustainable practices?  

Chastain: Time, where to get started and funding are some of the biggest hurdles we hear of from breweries just getting started on their sustainability journey. The majority of craft brewers are focused on making great beer and getting it out the door while operating on shoestring budgets and limited staff, so sustainability often falls to the bottom of the list.  However, once a brewery realizes that if a little time is invested, utilities savings are pretty abundant which end up paying for the time invested pretty quickly.

Foodable: List three ways that breweries are incorporating more sustainable practices when brewing beer today.

Chastain: This is a doozie because there’s so much going on in the industry! I supposed I would have to list three bucket areas that are applicable to all breweries: energy, water/wastewater and solid waste. Within each of those buckets are some pretty amazing projects. There is also work happening in the transportation sector, in the supply chain (both agricultural supply chain and packaging supply chain), and community involvement. So I have a hard time narrowing this down!

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Spring Trends in the Craft Beer Market

Spring Trends in the Craft Beer Market

By Fred Crudder, Foodable Industry Expert

If you live in a northerly climate, you are undoubtedly ecstatic to see winter ebb away as the onset of warmer weather signals the arrival of spring. With the onset of spring, everything around us begins to change as the world comes back to life. Change is everywhere, especially in the constantly evolving world of beer.

The Return to Session-Style Beers

One of the recent movements in the beer world was the extreme beer movement that peaked a few years ago. Consumers seemed to have no restraint when it came to beers that were intensely flavored, high in alcohol, full of oddball ingredients, or just downright weird. Brewers were happy to oblige, putting out a litany of creative beers that would not only blow out your taste buds, but put you under the table. This trend has ebbed substantially, but it left in its wake some amazing beers that remain in the pantheon of legendary, highly sought-after “whales.” Make no mistake though, this period of reckless experimentation brought us some truly awful beers, and thankfully most of those are no longer with us.

The natural follow-up to the extreme beer movement was a reversal of sorts. Beer drinkers were fatigued by the massive flavors and alcohol contents of those extreme beers, and ready for some good old-fashioned beer drinking. Along came the session beers. The English refer to lower ABV (alcohol by volume) beers as being “sessionable.” You can enjoy quite a few during a lengthy session at the pub. American brewers decided that they too could make full-flavored beer without the hefty ABVs, and they did. Beer drinkers were, as they generally tend to be about anything new, ecstatic. Suddenly the same people who couldn’t get enough of being walloped over the head with flavor and strength were bragging about the latest, most delicious, low ABV beer they discovered.

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Tips for Hosting a Beer Event at Your Restaurant or Bar

Tips for Hosting a Beer Event at Your Restaurant or Bar

By Fred Crudder, Foodable Industry Expert

Beer is hot. But beer events? Meh. They could use a refresher. Some of the old classics have served us well in the on-premise world, but if you keep recycling the same old stuff, you just might watch the beer lovers drift away. So let’s retool beer events, shall we? 

Let’s Do The Numbers

In a recent nationwide survey of craft beer consumers by Ticketleap, they found that 94 percent of the people polled are interested in meeting other craft beer lovers. They also found that 89 percent are into trying new beers as often as they can. Good stuff, right?

That same survey determined that 91 percent of those polled want to learn more about craft beer and that 79 percent are comfortable spending $20 on a beer event. So they want to be grouped together, learning more or tasting something new, and that a $20 price tag is about right. Even better stuff.

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Place In A Pint: How Craft Breweries Are Bringing the Concept of Terroir Back to Beer

Place In A Pint: How Craft Breweries Are Bringing the Concept of Terroir Back to Beer

By Justin Dolezal, Foodable Contributor

Locavorism has become one of the dominant food trends of the past ten years, as millennial diners have become increasingly conscientious about the origin of the foods they eat. What started as a desire for general information on farms, producers and products has morphed into an intense general interest in local cuisine. While this might seem like a strictly millennial trend, it has its roots in the centuries old concept of terroir, or the idea that food and drink can paint a picture of the place from whence it came. 

Though the idea of terroir is most closely associated with wine (though many in the wine world cast doubt on the concept's validity), it is also common for producers working in fields such coffee, chocolate, cheese, tea and agave to invoke the term to describe the effect that a certain place can have on the agricultural products it produces. Knowing that a renewed interest in place and product authenticity can be a big selling point to millennial diners has brought the idea of terroir to the forefront of food and beverage movements where it might least have been expected, including terroir-driven wine's cool younger sibling: craft beer.

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