Will a Themed-Restaurant Drive-In Propel Tesla Forward?

Will a Themed-Restaurant Drive-In Propel Tesla Forward?

It looks like Elon Musk is actually following through with his “old school drive-in, roller skates & rock restaurant” idea that he had shared on Twitter earlier this year. (Still, no hints about what a rock restaurant is—perhaps he meant a rock ‘n’ roll-themed restaurant?)

Anyhow, according to “The Drive,” this new restaurant drive-in for Tesla drivers will be located on an old Volvo dealership in Santa Monica, Ca. since “a new application popped up on the City of Santa Monica’s ePermits site, specifically for a ‘Tesla restaurant and supercharger station.’”

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Beyond vs. Impossible: Which Meatless Burger Will Conquer the Industry?

It looks like those bleeding veggie burgers are becoming more accessible to the masses.

Earlier this year, Foodable reported on how companies like Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are disrupting the meat industry by offering alternative protein to consumers like never before— by catering to both carnivores and flexitarians.

This October, Fatburger, the California hamburger fast casual brand, announced it will begin serving the Impossible Burger in Southern California.

“Fatburger pioneered the development of the ‘better burger’ industry,” said Fatburger CEO Andrew Wiederhorn, in a press release. “Now we're pioneering menu development with the Impossible Burger, and are excited to offer it to our customers.”

Meanwhile, Beyond Burger recently made a deal with Sysco, the largest food distributor to thousands of restaurants, schools, hospitals and other outlets.

While Impossible Foods also aims to supply its scientifically-engineered, heme-bleeding, meat-tasting, plant-based burger to high-end restaurants around the country, Beyond Meat earned a spot on the menu of casual dining chain TGI Friday’s, not to mention it is selling its alternative burger directly to consumers through select grocery stores.

"Similar to how we've partnered with conventional grocery stores to bring The Beyond Burger to the meat aisle where everyday consumers shop for protein, we are thrilled to be a part of Sysco's Cutting Edge Solutions program to bring The Beyond Burger to menus alongside beef at thousands of mainstream restaurants nationwide" said Ethan Brown, Beyond Meat’s CEO in a press release.

While Beyond Meat gets a boost in distribution, Impossible Foods’ founder and CEO, Patrick Brown, reveals his hopes to replace other foods besides just beef.

“We want to completely replace animals as a food production technology by 2035,” said Patrick Brown, who is also a Stanford biochemist, at a press briefing. “We are working on producing all foods that we get from animals.”

Can you imagine plant-based bacon, fish, or eggs that taste close to the real deal?

The news comes after the Impossible Foods opened its large-scale production facility in Oakland, Calif. earlier this year.

It is appropriate to mention, Beyond Meat has partnered-up with BurgerFi, a gourmet burger joint, to bring its plant-based patty to burger lovers visiting the chain’s many stores. This makes BurgerFi the first national fast casual brand to offer The Beyond Burger.


Whether people are eating more plant-based foods for health or ethical reasons, the trend is growing steadily. Although a world without meat seems far, far away in the future, it looks like this is the beginning of a world with plenty of more choices.

How The Organic Coup is Cleaning Fast Food, One Chicken at a Time

While some consumers may believe fast food is a fast track to unhealthy eating, The Organic Coup hatched a new idea when it comes to chicken. This brand became the first USDA certified organic fast food restaurant, confirmed by their certifying agency, CCOF.

"We were shocked to find out we were first," founder Erica Welton said.

This concept was inspired by the team's years of working at Costco Wholesale, and the push for social change in foodservice became the foundation of the business. The name began as a typo for the word "coop," but "coup" was also fitting: coup is defined as a takeover, and that's exactly what this restaurant is doing — taking over the fast food industry with a new, organic attitude, proving that fast food has the potential to be good food.

"We want to serve the highest-quality product at a fair price," Welton said. "I'm also a mom of two young boys. [I'm] very passionate about what goes into my kids' food. Chemicals, pesticides, antibiotics, and as a food buyer for Costco, learning more and more about what is getting put into our food — it was scary."

The Menu

Organic efforts could become complex, but The Organic Coup's operation is simple.

"We are not going to be a restaurant that has 50 items on the menu," Welton said.

The Coup Signature Sandwich is made up of chicken sourced locally from Mary's Free Range Organic Air-Chilled Chicken. The breasts are soaked in buttermilk, hand-breaded, and fried in coconut oil — honestly, the most expensive oil they could choose, but it is low in cholesterol and high in vitamin A. The menu also consists of a wrap and a bowl, and all buns are toasted and wraps are steamed to order. 

The restaurant also offers unique sauces, from spicy BBQ ranch, sesame ginger, mustard Vinaigrette, and more. Guests with a sweet tooth can also nibble on their organic popcorn, drizzled in caramel and with either white or dark chocolate. 

The Philosophy

More than about making fast food good food, The Organic Coup is about being good to the environment, too. Their chicken is air-chilled, a tactic used in Europe and Canada. Unlike the water chlorine bath method used in the United States, air-chilled facilities save 30,000 gallons of water every day.

The tables at the restaurant also have a touch of sustainability, as they are made from reclaimed wood (and were even built by Welton's father. All the restaurant's cleaning supplies and pest control are also organic certified. And to continue the education of their staff, The Organic Coup has a wall dedicated to going back to the basics, emphasizing the importance of non-GMO and hormone use.

"You know, I think it's very difficult to cheat Mother Nature, and in the end, there is always a price to pay. To disrupt such an old mentality on the way food was being brought to people just seemed like a lot of fun," Welton said.

Power to the chicken! Want to learn more about how this restaurant is rewriting fast food? Watch the full episode now.