How to Leverage Third-Party Partnerships and Technology to Increase Off-Premise Profits

We are halfway through the first season of The Takeout Delivery and Catering Show and have covered the foundations for making sure your off-premise strategies are making you money. If you are struggling with the off-premise paradigm shift, if you feel like your catering and delivery channels are not working as effectively as they should, if you see the potential of off-premise but your bottom line is not reflecting the vision, then make sure to listen to the first half of the season to learn how to make your off-premise strategies smart, discoverable and profitable.

There are so many option and so many players, it's a challenge to figure out what is the right blueprint for off-premise success.  The fundamentals of your off-premise strategies are crucial to your future success. In today's episode, Valerie and Erle speak with Richard Hodges, Vice President of Operations Services at La Madeleine. La Madeleine has had 6 years of consecutive growth in the off-premise space. Richard Hodges shares their industry leading strategies like how to leverage third-party partnerships, using the technology to reach customers on multiple platforms, and streamlining the technology to maximize efficiency and profitability.   

Show Notes

14:46 - Free the data!
16:33 - Loyalty intergration.
21:07 - Negotiating with third-party service providers.
25:36 - Please send us your questions and comments at producer@foodabletv.com
 

01:54 - Meet Richard Hodges, Vice President of Operations Services at La Madeleine.
02:26 - Le Madeleine's history in the off-premise space.
04:35 - The importance of differentiating your off-premise channels.
06:58 - Using technology and partnerships to increase efficiency and profits. 

 

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GrubHub Drivers Ruled Contractors in Landmark Gig-Economy Case

GrubHub Drivers Ruled Contractors in Landmark Gig-Economy Case

In a landmark ruling Thursday, U.S. Magistrate Judge Jacqueline Scott Corley in San Francisco concluded that a gig-economy driver does not qualify for the protection of employees under California law.

The decision is the first of its kind, setting a standard for arguments regarding “gig-economy” workers.

The gig-economy has gotten much press as of late. With a number of businesses like Grubhub and Uber working off the model of pairing customers with products and services through apps, many workers have found a new form of income allowing high flexibility in exchange for low skill, low wage, episodic jobs.

However, the case against GrubHub, brought on by Raef Lawson, claimed the company violated California labor laws by not reimbursing his expenses, paying him less than minimum wage and failing to pay overtime. His argument was based on the idea that Grubhub exerts a certain level of control over. The company expects drivers to be available to accept assignments during shifts they sign up for and to remain in designated geographical areas.

Lawson worked as a food-delivery driver with the company for less than six months while pursuing a career as an actor and writer.

At a hearing in October, Judge Corley expressed concern that Lawson’s resume filed with the lawsuit may have tainted the trial because the actor lied about completing a three-year program. The specifics of the program weren’t provided. However, Corley said Lawson was “dishonest” and that the resume “is really problematic to me.”

Charlotte Garden, an associate law professor at Seattle University, said to Bloomberg that Corley’s decision is a “doubly big” win for GrubHub since California’s relatively high standard for establishing workers as independent contractors will mean similar arguments in other states will most likely side with this ruling.

You can read more about this case at "Bloomberg."

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DoorDash is Using Its Technology to Give Back to the Needy

DoorDash is Using Its Technology to Give Back to the Needy

By law, restaurant owners cannot serve leftover food to guests the following day. So, what is a chef or restaurateur to do with all the extra food?

You could always have employees take some home, but what if you still have more after that?

According to “Fast Company,” “An average restaurant might waste 100,000 pounds of foods a year.”

Enter DoorDash. This food delivery company is using its algorithm to help restaurant owners with a surplus of food finding a person to deliver it to the nearest shelter caring for hungry homeless people, for example.

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Chipotle Finally Gives Into Delivery

Chipotle Finally Gives Into Delivery

Chipotle. The name itself is enough to get burrito lovers salivating. But now, loyal Chipotle bingers have more reason for mind explosion: The fast casual brand is launching delivery. 

Chipotle recently announced a partnership with Postmates,* a third-party, on-demand delivery service that currently has presence in 67 markets. (So, if you’re not in one of these cities, this perk probably does not apply to you — but may the odds be ever in your favor.)

Despite the fact that guac is extra and that pork has become a limited menu item, Chipotle has never had a problem with championing fast casual Fresh Mex. And its recent earnings report has the numbers to back it up: Sales grew 10.4% in same-store sales for Q1 2015.

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Chili's Launches Nationwide Delivery Service

Foodable WebTV Network

Foodable WebTV Network

Thanks to concepts like Chipotle, consumers have become conditioned to quick, easy and transparent dining experiences. But in a beloved world of fast casuals, how does a casual chain step up to match speed of service?

Chili's, which made a mark in the industry by adopting tabletop tablets, is taking things a step further when it comes to consumer convenience: delivery service. Though this only works with orders of $125 or more, the new service will bring in a new source of revenue, should it prove to be successful. This also puts the brand in a good spot for lunch, especially office orders. Read More