Urban Agriculture Startup Gotham Greens Closes $29 Million Round of Funding

Urban Agriculture Startup Gotham Greens Closes $29 Million Round of Funding

Gotham Greens, a technologically advanced urban agriculture startup, has closed a $29 million Series C financing round, bringing its total equity funding to $45 million, according to Fortune.

The Brooklyn-based company says the same investors that have backed them from the beginning continue to invest. “They’re sticking with the company. They like the profitability and the returns,” says co-founder and CEO Viraj Puri.

But a new investor, global investment company Creadev, joined the club with a “significant” investment. Creadev is funded by the Mulliez family– one of the wealthiest families in France.

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Andean Dream's Organic Quinoa Pasta Solves the Gluten-Free Texture Issue

Andean Dream's Organic Quinoa Pasta Solves the Gluten-Free Texture Issue
  • Andean Dream's Organic Quinoa Pasta Solves the Gluten-Free Texture Issue.

  • Andean Dream Supports Farmers from Bolivia with its Dairy free, Corn Free, Nut free, Soy free pasta.

Ingrid Hirstin-Lazcano founded Andean Dream in 2006 after her husband Fernando Lazcano-Dunn introduced her to the struggles of the indigenous quinoa farmers in Bolivia. Fernando was serving as the Consul General of Bolivia in Los Angeles and introduced Ingrid to the farmers who, at the time, were living well below the poverty line.

AIming to provide help to these families, she developed quinoa cookies in her kitchen, and in June 2006, traveled to Bolivia to connect with a quinoa supplier who had obtained organic certification for 280 indigenous farming families. These families became her dedicated supplier for this superfood.

Now, Andean Dream also produces a line of gluten-free, allergen-friendly pasta that is making a name for themselves. A great option for consumers with special dietary demands, all the pastas are free from gluten, dairy, eggs, soy, corn, and nuts. All products are also non-GMO and Fair trade.

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Serenbe: The Utopian Community Balancing Development with Green Space

Serenbe: The Utopian Community Balancing Development with Green Space
  • Serenbe creates Cluster Communities to maximize green space

  • Utopian community uses nature and art to focus their lifestyle.

On this episode of The Barron Report, brought to you by Off-Premise Insights, Paul talks to a different type of hospitality professional. Steve Nygren is the founder of Serenbe, a community that has been described as a “Utopian experiment.” Nygren comes from the restaurant and hospitality industry, boasting experience with Stouffers Hotels and later opening more than 30 restaurants under his own name.

The idea for Serenbe came after Nygren moved his family to a multi-acre farm. Fearing serious development by a neighbor, Nygren began buying up land around his plot to ensure his green space would remain. The idea evolved to create a development in which 70% of the space would be reserved for green space, rather than conforming to the current models of urban sprawl.

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A Chicago Entrepreneur is Changing Vertical Farming as We Know It

Foodable WebTV Network

Foodable WebTV Network

Over the past few years, as consumers have become more knowledgeable about food, the stress for more direct food supply has become apparent. Between the rise of farm-to-table restaurants, larger crowds at local farmers markets, and weaving food origin into menus all over the world, the industry has shifted. And we’re very happy about that.

For farmers and distributors, it’s not always an easy task to keep up with the demand. In major food cities, known for their decadent restaurant scenes, urban farming has become the solution. And the lack of city space has forced growers to invest in vertical farming. “Vertical farming is kind of a vision of factory farming of plants,” said Stan Cox of The Land Institute in Kansas. He tells Harvest Public Media, “Just like with animals, it requires much higher inputs of energy, much more stress on the plant, and generally is doing things the hard way.”

Well, one Chicago entrepreneur — John Edel — is about to change the game by installing a “giant anaerobic digester” that will convert food waste into heat and electricity. Read More