Restaurants Pinky’s Space & Cosa Buona Improve Packaging and Hold Times to Win Delivery Dollars

Restaurants Pinky’s Space & Cosa Buona Improve Packaging and Hold Times to Win Delivery Dollars
  • These restaurants are upping the ante when it comes to food delivery.

  • Colorful to-go boxes and menus cultivated for transit are methods to stand out in the food delivery industry.

Diners these days are looking for ease and convenience. They want food right from the oven to their door. With apps like GrubHub, UberEATS and Seamless delivery options are easy to find.

According to a study, the number of deliveries has risen ten percent. As a result of consumers craving convenience eating at home offers over eating out, restaurants are changing the way it does business.

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Ford and Postmates Deliver with "Self-Driving" Delivery Vehicles in Miami

Ford and Postmates Deliver with "Self-Driving" Delivery Vehicles in Miami

Ford and Postmates have partnered up to create an on-demand delivery platform powered by a self-driving delivery service that is currently being tested in Miami.

In a self-penned article on Medium, Ford Autonomous Vehicle Business Team member, Alexandra Ford English says the on-demand delivery platform is currently being tested in Miami and Miami Beach with more than 70 businesses participating, including local favorite, Coyo Taco. For residents in the area, when you order through Postmates, you could be given the option to have your food delivered by a self-driving research vehicle.

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HelloFresh and Grubhub Snatch Up Restaurant Customers

HelloFresh and Grubhub Snatch Up Restaurant Customers

Consumers today are looking to save time, money, and calories. And in trying to do that, it has completely changed how and where they eat. According to data from the USDA, at least 50% of U.S. food expenditures in 2014 we’re allocated towards food away from home. That number has steadily increased since they began collecting the data in 1929.

Additional USDA data shows that 62 percent of millennials surveyed in December 2017 reported purchasing prepared deli food, carry-out, delivery, or fast food within the last seven days.

Mostly fueled by trends to eat healthier meals in shorter amounts of time, consumers are more than willing to fork over some extra cash for convenience and time efficiency.

According to business insider, there is a massive unfulfilled market opportunity here.

“As of 2015, about $210 billion worth of food is ordered for delivery or takeout on an annual basis in the U.S., according to Morgan Stanley research. But two of the industry leaders, GrubHub/Seamless and Eat24, generated a combined $2.6 billion in food sales last year. This means the market is underpenetrated but massive, which will incentivize continued competition and, potentially, an influx of new entrants.”

Meanwhile, the meal kit industry has seen exactly that sort of influx. The meal kit industry was dominated by Blue Apron just one year ago. Now, though Blue Apron has managed to hold on to its lead internationally, their market share has more dropped more than 17 percent and now Hello Fresh has surpassed them as the largest meal kit company in the US. And other competitors like Home Chef and Sunbasket are now gobbling up those extra dollars.

But the overall popularity of meal kits is dipping. The Wall Street Journal recently reported that investors have all but abandoned the meal kits space. And data from Foodable Labs shows that all the top meal kit brands are showing decreases in their consumer sentiment ratings.

Still, the meal kit industry is a 1.5 billion dollar industry, and certain segments of our industry are heavily impacted by consumer crossover with meal kits and groceraunts. For example, 34.7% of fast casual customers also use meal kits or groceraunts, making them a direct competitor. QSR’s, on the other hand, are safest with only 12.3% crossover.

Check out the episode above and let us know what other data you want to see!

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GrubHub Drivers Ruled Contractors in Landmark Gig-Economy Case

GrubHub Drivers Ruled Contractors in Landmark Gig-Economy Case

In a landmark ruling Thursday, U.S. Magistrate Judge Jacqueline Scott Corley in San Francisco concluded that a gig-economy driver does not qualify for the protection of employees under California law.

The decision is the first of its kind, setting a standard for arguments regarding “gig-economy” workers.

The gig-economy has gotten much press as of late. With a number of businesses like Grubhub and Uber working off the model of pairing customers with products and services through apps, many workers have found a new form of income allowing high flexibility in exchange for low skill, low wage, episodic jobs.

However, the case against GrubHub, brought on by Raef Lawson, claimed the company violated California labor laws by not reimbursing his expenses, paying him less than minimum wage and failing to pay overtime. His argument was based on the idea that Grubhub exerts a certain level of control over. The company expects drivers to be available to accept assignments during shifts they sign up for and to remain in designated geographical areas.

Lawson worked as a food-delivery driver with the company for less than six months while pursuing a career as an actor and writer.

At a hearing in October, Judge Corley expressed concern that Lawson’s resume filed with the lawsuit may have tainted the trial because the actor lied about completing a three-year program. The specifics of the program weren’t provided. However, Corley said Lawson was “dishonest” and that the resume “is really problematic to me.”

Charlotte Garden, an associate law professor at Seattle University, said to Bloomberg that Corley’s decision is a “doubly big” win for GrubHub since California’s relatively high standard for establishing workers as independent contractors will mean similar arguments in other states will most likely side with this ruling.

You can read more about this case at "Bloomberg."

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David Chang's Delivery-Only Restaurant "Ando" Acquired By UberEats

David Chang's Delivery-Only Restaurant "Ando" Acquired By UberEats

David Chang’s delivery-only restaurant, Ando, announced Monday that they have been acquired by UberEats.

It’s an interesting move for the delivery giant after Foodable reported on Uber’s jump into building virtual restaurants in established kitchens. It seems the next chapter for UberEats is producing their own food to deliver.

Uber is already on par to dominate the food delivery sector in 2018. “We’ll be the largest food delivery company in the world this year,” Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said Monday at DLD in Munich.

According to the notice on Ando’s homepage, the company is shutting down its service, effective immediately, as it begins to integrate with Uber Eats. Since launching in May 2016, the company had been working with Uber Eats as a delivery partner, alongside other delivery services and a few of its own people.

UberEverything, the portion of the business not focused on ride-hailing, is run by Jason Droege who said in a statement, “We are committed to investing in technology that helps consumers, delivery and restaurant partners alike. Ando’s insights will help our restaurant technology team as we work with our restaurant partners to grow their business.”

It sounds like Uber will be combining their proprietary technology, which has allowed the business to anticipate and fill gaps in food offerings, with Ando’s technology, though Ando has not specifically said what their role will be in the new partnership.

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