Adam Sachs No Longer With Saveur

Adam Sachs No Longer With Saveur

Saveur editor-in-chief Adam Sachs’s tenure at the food magazine is over. The magazine’s publisher, Bonnier Corporation, laid off 70 staff members at offices in California, New York, and Florida, Recode reported Wednesday.

Several worked at Saveur magazine including Saveur digital editor Dan Dao. After news of the layoffs broke, rumors quickly swirled that Sachs was no longer with the company. Sachs confirmed his departure to Grub Street over email but added that he could not comment beyond that.

According to the New York Times, Saveur is reducing its publication schedule to four issues a year. Its editorial department now consists of just six full-time employees.

The news was met with grim reactions, but on Twitter, editor Alex Testere reaffirmed that the magazine was not folding.

“The few of us left are obviously reeling a little bit from losing some of our closest friends and colleagues, but we still have faith that we’ll be able to make Saveur a beautiful quarterly magazine, and also keep up our original digital content,” Testere wrote to Grub Street the day after the news broke. “The layoffs are sad and unfortunate, but I’m personally looking forward to continuing to work with everyone in whatever capacity we can.”

Before taking the top position at Saveur after longtime editor James Oseland, Sachs had a long career as a writer covering food and other subjects. He wrote for publications including GQ, Bon Appétit, and Details, and has won several James Beard Foundation Awards. Sachs was brought on before Saveur’s digital relaunch in 2015.

“Saveur is special,” Sachs said to the New York Times. “I know there’s an audience for the kind of in-depth, smart reporting the magazine has always been known for. The challenge for anyone in this business now is, how do you package and sell the good stuff in a way that’s sustainable?”

Read more about Sachs’ career at Grub Street.

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Chipotle Initiates Search for New CEO as Steve Ells Steps Down 

Chipotle Initiates Search for New CEO as Steve Ells Steps Down 

Steve Ells, the founder and mastermind behind the fast casual that started it all, Chipotle, announced on Wednesday that he is stepping down as the CEO of the chain.

However, he will be stepping into the executive chairman role. 

This seems like the chain's latest move as part of its comeback strategy. 

Chipotle has been plagued with a series of PR nightmares following a few food safety scandals that were exposed starting back in November 2015. 

It's no secret, the brand has had difficulty recovering. 

The company reported a 29.7% decrease in same-store sales in the first quarter of 2016, following the media frenzy after the first food safety crisis.

Chipotle's shares were up but 4.4% early Wednesday, according to the "New York Post."

But with stock prices no where close to where they were before the crisis, the brand has launched multiple free giveaway campaigns in attempt to recreate the long lines of the past at Chipotle stores.

But, investors have demanded big changes and it looks like Ells has decided to bring in a new CEO to direct the brand's comeback efforts. 

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Millennials are Spending Less at Restaurants and More in Other Markets

Millennials are Spending Less at Restaurants and More in Other Markets

You are probably tired of seeing the term millennial in headlines. We don't blame ya! 

But as a marketer or operator, millennials are likely part of your target demographic. This segment of the population will soon have the greatest buying power, so its no wonder we are trying to predict their every move. 

According to a recent report from "CNBC," there has been a shift in where consumers are choosing to spend their money. 

"It stands out as a bit unusual how soft restaurant spending has been considering where we are in the business cycle," said Michelle Meyer, head of U.S. economics at BofA Merrill Lynch to "CNBC." "The consumer should be spending more on a broad range of items. But we've seen restaurants slowing more akin to a recessionary environment."

Part of the reason restaurant sales have been slowing down is because millennials are spending their money in other markets instead. 

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Why Seattle’s Restaurant Boom is Making Local Chefs Nervous

Why Seattle’s Restaurant Boom is Making Local Chefs Nervous

Seattle isn’t only the home of some of the best coffee shops in the country, but now more chefs are flocking to the city. 

In a month and a half in the summer, 40 new restaurants opened. In the first quarter of 2017, Seattle had 2,696 restaurants, which is a 25% increase from a decade ago, according to the Department of Revenue.

Not to mention, the majority of the restaurants stick it out their first year. 87% of restaurants survive in the city within the first year. 

But that doesn’t mean that even the most renowned chefs don’t struggle in the city and aren't nervous about what the future holds for Seattle's culinary landscape. 

James Beard Award-winning chef Maria Hines’ Ballard restaurant, Golden Beetle. It served all-organic, adventurous takes on Mediterranean food, but the neighborhood balked at paying more for a gyro. “My heart aches,” she said upon changing the place to a family-friendly, conceptually easy-to-swallow gastropub earlier this year. But she still couldn’t get out from under the debt. Hines closed Golden Beetle this spring to concentrate on her other two restaurants, Tilth and Agrodolce,” writes "The Seattle Times."

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DoorDash Offers Chefs “Virtual” Restaurant Space in Silicon Valley

DoorDash Offers Chefs “Virtual” Restaurant Space in Silicon Valley

DoorDash isn’t only making it easier for foodies to get food delivered directly to their door, the food delivery company is offering space for chefs and restaurateur looking to test delivery-only concepts.  

DoorDash has a 2,000 square foot-food commissary in Silicon Valley equipped with four kitchens that are being offered up as virtual restaurant space.

The company’s kitchens are perfect for restaurateurs looking to experiment with concepts that don’t have a traditional restaurant storefront and dining room. 

Virtual restaurants offer strictly online delivery. These concepts are on the rise as delivery becomes more popular with today’s consumer.

Kitava, formerly known as Mealmade is an on-demand virtual restaurant has gained traction in the San Francisco area. This virtual restaurant has made a name for itself by delivering healthy, made-to-order meals that are often are organic, paleo, and gluten-free. The meals are sold as at an affordable price point. 

Virtual restaurants are kind of like the modern-day food truck. They have less overhead due to the costs saved from not hiring as much staff and not having to pay as much for prime real estate. 

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