Food Delivery Discount Service Increases Sales During Restaurant Off-Peak Hours

Food Delivery Discount Service Increases Sales During Restaurant Off-Peak Hours

hough delivery has proven to be a huge market with the likes of UberEats and Grubhub snatching up restaurant dollars, it has also proven to be extremely expensive for operators and, consequently, for consumers.

According to Forbes, Restaurants could pay anywhere between 11% and 45% commission on each order if they sign up for a delivery service. And while restaurants admit that adding these services improve order numbers and total revenue, these rates are huge. And the delivery fees on the consumer side aren’t tiny either.

Two entrepreneurial brothers based in NYC noticed this issue while scouring for promo codes and coupons to lower their delivery order prices. Wondering, ‘why isn’t there some sort of food delivery happy hour’ Mohamed and Sidi Ahmed Merzouk set out to create this type of app.

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FoodMaven Is Solving All of The Industry's Problems, Starting with Food Waste

FoodMaven Is Solving All of The Industry's Problems, Starting with Food Waste

On this episode of The Barron Report, we explore an issue that has been plaguing our industry for years. Patrick Bultema and FoodMaven have been working to completely optimize food distribution systems in Colorado to reduce food waste, and they’re getting really good at it. Hear how FoodMaven is a win-win for producers, restaurateurs, food manufacturers, food banks, and the environment, all in this Earth-saving episode.

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DoorDash is Using Its Technology to Give Back to the Needy

DoorDash is Using Its Technology to Give Back to the Needy

By law, restaurant owners cannot serve leftover food to guests the following day. So, what is a chef or restaurateur to do with all the extra food?

You could always have employees take some home, but what if you still have more after that?

According to “Fast Company,” “An average restaurant might waste 100,000 pounds of foods a year.”

Enter DoorDash. This food delivery company is using its algorithm to help restaurant owners with a surplus of food finding a person to deliver it to the nearest shelter caring for hungry homeless people, for example.

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Graffiti Earth: Reducing Food Waste One Dish at a Time

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In this episode of “Sustain,” we learn about the buy-ugly movement through the eyes of Chef Jehangir Mehta, a world-renowned chef who explores ways to reduce his food wastage footprint.

Born in Mumbai, Mehta was a runner-up on the Food Network’s "The Next Iron Chef." He attributes his innate ability to find the best ways to reduce waste to being from a third-world country, like India.

“It doesn’t matter if you came from a rich family or not, [waste] is just something you see on a day-to-day basis. It just becomes a part of your life.”

Mehta applies this conservationist philosophy to his Indian-inspired cuisine in his latest TriBeCa restaurant venture, Graffiti Earth, the new sibling to his popular East Village restaurant, Graffiti Food & Wine. There, he focuses more on a vegetable-forward menu (something he has always done, but never really emphasized on) along with integrating an environmentally-conscious approach to décor, with furniture made from renewable materials and even crockery.

“We don’t buy plate sets. They came from my family and friends. If you have unwanted sets, let me know.”

According to the Natural Resources Defense Council, 40 percent of food grown and produced in the United States never gets eaten. And an alarming 52 percent of fruits and vegetables that are being produced never make it to your fork. Mehta does not place the blame only on retailers, who have to deal with the pressures of having fully stocked displays and the expectations of cosmetic perfection, but he also accuses the consumer of exercising produce prejudice when they see a blemished fruit or vegetable and turn the other way.

“Are you going to buy a tomato, even if you know very clearly [you’re] going to make tomato sauce today, you could definitely buy a tomato which is a bit squished or [with] a dent, but will you do it?” asks Chef Jehangir Mehta rhetorically. “You are not doing it, so you can’t always blame the grocery store [for food waste] you have to blame the public, too!”

Generally, it’s hard to get produce scraps, however, Mehta has worked with many of the farmers he frequents in the market in other restaurant-unrelated projects and has had the chance to build positive relationships with them. These relationships mutually benefit each party, since farmers reduce food waste by giving away their blemished, twisted, deformed or “ugly” food, that they know consumers will not typically purchase, to a chef who would put the food to good use, and, in turn, Mehta receives the fruits and vegetables for free or at a discounted rate.

To learn more, watch the episode above!

The Food Waste Challenge: Donate Goods, Deduct Food, and Devote Time

The Food Waste Challenge: Donate Goods, Deduct Food, and Devote Time

By Jaclyn Morgan, FCSI, JM Foodservice Consulting, LLC

Let’s be honest, food waste happens at your restaurant. Some trimmings can be composted, some things recycled, but much more ends up in the trash. Unsightly produce, cans of food on the brink of expiration, and extra prepared dishes add up to money flushed down the toilet. Your last bulk order or a menu change may have you seeing red. Per the Green Restaurant Association, a single restaurant in the U.S. produces between 25,000 and 75,000 pounds of food waste in one year.

Now change your perspective. Last year, over 42 million Americans lived in poverty and in a food insecure household. Nonprofit food banks, food pantries, charitable meal programs, and soup kitchens rely on food donations to provide their communities with hunger relief.

Take another look. Nationwide, a staggering 40 percent of food goes uneaten, and most often than not, ends up in a landfill. The Environmental Protection Agency notes that food waste decomposing in landfills creates methane gas, a greenhouse gas more potent than carbon dioxide.

You don’t have to dump a bucket of ice over your head to be aware that your restaurant can be socially responsibility and sustainable. Food waste can become a charitable donation without liability, and your establishment can reap the rewards of tax deductions and community involvement.

So, take the Food Waste Challenge. Here’s how you can donate goods, deduct food, and devote time.

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